Nones Less Likely to Prioritize Their Own Discrimation

A new Pew survey has some fascinating findings about how different demographic groups perceive who is and is not discriminated against in society. This is particularly true of white evangelical Christians, who think their own group is the second most likely to face discrimination (53% acknowledge anti-gay discrimination, 50% think white evangelicals face discrimination; no other group reaches 50%, including blacks at 36%).

The other fascinating thing about the survey is that the religiously unaffiliated appear to be more willing to acknowledge discrimination against other groups rather than themselves (or against atheists, at least, which is admittedly not the same as unaffiliated). The only two groups they don’t think face more discrimination than atheists are white evangelicals and Catholics. Here’s a chart showing the full results:

PewSurvey

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  • eric

    OT but since we’re discussing statistical surveys, Science has a new research article on morality, politics, and religion. The results won’t be suprising to most readers here in that they contradict what religious fundamentalists often claim: religious people are no more moral than nonreligious people. Other interesting findings:

    1. A sense of purpose is correlated with doing moral acts, but not with being religious.

    2. Happiness is correlated with having good moral deeds done to you (and unhappiness with having bad moral deeds done to you).

    3. People tend to report more good things done to them (vs. bad things), but they tend to gossip more about bad thnigs (vs. good things) done to other people.

    4. Political liberals remember and report more ‘fairness/unfairness’ acts and acts with similar moral ‘dimensions’. Political conservatives remember and reprt more ‘loyalty/disloyalty’ acts and acts with similar moral dimensions.

  • Pierce R. Butler

    They didn’t even ask who perceives discrimination against whites?!?

    Yet more proof of the rampant bigotry against Honko-Americans!

  • Chiroptera

    …50% think white evangelicals face discrimination….

    I’m surprised that this number is so low. Recall that this is a group whose spokespersons claim that merely being told that they are wrong is “persecution.”

    The other fascinating thing about the survey is that the religiously unaffiliated appear to be more willing to acknowledge discrimination against other groups rather than themselves (or against atheists, at least, which is admittedly not the same as unaffiliated).

    How many atheists or unaffiliated have personally experienced discrimination? I have been an atheist since high school, and I have never been discriminated against beyond about two individuals who had Barney Google eyes as their minds were boggled. (Oh, and one drunk who was so angry that I was wondering whether he was going to throw a punch; maybe that counts.)

    I would think that when one isn’t suffering oneself it would be easy to dismiss the cases in the news as exceptions rather than the worst of a common pattern.

  • eric

    The other fascinating thing about the survey is that the religiously unaffiliated appear to be more willing to acknowledge discrimination against other groups rather than themselves

    Its not that surprising to me, given that the majority of self-professed atheists are male. I believe self-professed atheists also tend to be more highly educated. So I think the co-founding factors explain the result pretty adequately.

  • lofgren

    I thnk it’s easy to overlook discrimination against atheists because atheism is really an undercover category compared to all of the others. Most atheists really have to go out of their way to tell others that they are atheists, and religion is a taboo subject in many places where atheists are likely to suffer discrimination. Meanwhile the othrr categories are easily detectable through physical or behavioral characteristics. Most atheists will never suffer discrimination simply because most people will never know that they are atheists, and atheists have the most control over who gets to know about their status.

  • doublereed

    More White Evangelicals believe there is a lot of discrimination against Evangelicals than White Evangelicals believe there is a lot of discrimination against blacks??? As in, there is at least 14% of White Evangelicals who say that White Evangelicals face a lot of discrimination but blacks do not.

    That’s really fucked up.

  • http://anexerciseinfutility.blogspot.com tommykey

    I really should prioritize my discrimation!

  • http://www.facebook.com/cosmicaug augustpamplona

    Chiroptera writes:

    …50% think white evangelicals face discrimination….

    I’m surprised that this number is so low. Recall that this is a group whose spokespersons claim that merely being told that they are wrong is “persecution.”

    To put in full context, the group most likely to believe that white evangelicals are strongly being discriminated against is white evangelicals and white evangelicals are, at the same time, the group least likely to believe that the other groups are not strongly discriminated against (they come dead last or next to dead last in all the other columns). As such, I think this table supports the hypothesis of a white Evangelical Christian persecution complex more than adequately.

    By the way, why is there no black evangelical category here? Are their numbers so small?

  • DonDueed

    Ed, there’s a third group that the Unaffiliateds think faces less discrimination than Atheists, namely Jews (30% vs. 36%). That puts Atheists more or less in the middle of the pack.

  • alanuk

    I totally agree, white evangelicals are discriminated against; but mostly by other white evangelicals.

    Think about it.

  • http://cheapsignals.blogspot.com Gretchen

    From the survey article:

    (The survey included too few interviews with Muslims, Jews and atheists to permit analysis of their responses to these questions, and it did not ask respondents whether they identify as gay or lesbian.)

  • khms

    So 33% Catholics see Catholics discriminated … but only 26% of white Catholics? Ah: 41% of Hispanic Catholics. Perhaps, given that a lot of Hispanics are discriminated against for their Hispanic-ness (71%), the two discriminations sort of bleed into each other for them?

    That hypothesis is strengthened at least a little by seeing that 41% Blacks (82%) see Atheists discriminated, though the situation there seems more complicated in that lots of Hispanics are themselves Catholics, whereas (AFAIU) few Blacks are Atheists, so seeing this from the outside.