Billy Graham Lies About History

Billy Graham is about a million years old and has been in ill health for years, but he (or someone ghostwriting for him) has an article on his website completely distorting history and making absurd claims about the importance of prayer and religion for a nation to be successful.

Our nation was founded by men who believed in prayer. When our government was being formed, Benjamin Franklin addressed the chairman of the Constitutional Convention meeting at Philadelphia in 1787, saying, “I have lived, sir, a long time, and the longer I live the more convincing proofs I see of this truth: that God governs in the affairs of men. And if a sparrow cannot fall to the ground without His notice, it is probable that an empire cannot rise without His aid.”…

If this nation was born in a meeting based on prayer—some of its most important decisions being made only after careful prayer to God—how can we go on unless there is a renewed emphasis on prayer today?

He leaves out just one tiny little fact: Franklin’s motion for prayer was ignored by the other attendees at the Constitutional Convention and that prayer he proposed, to bring together the two fractious sides, never took place. So his claim that this convention was “based on prayer” is absurd. Indeed, one could just as easily argue that it was based on drunkenness, given that they threw a party near the end of the convention at which they drank “54 bottles of Madeira, 60 bottles of claret, eight of whiskey, 22 of porter, eight of hard cider, 12 of beer, and seven bowls of alcoholic punch.” There were 55 of them.

Christ instructed His followers to pray, both by teaching and by example. So fervent and so direct were His prayers that one time when He had finished praying, His followers turned to Him and said, “Lord, teach us to pray” (Luke 11:1). They knew that Jesus had been in touch with God, and they wanted to have such an experience.

And part of that instruction was to pray privately, not publicly, which you have flouted your entire life and demand that others do so as well.

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What Are Your Thoughts?leave a comment
  • matty1

    You’d think a man of his age would remember this personally, maybe his memory is going.

  • eric

    how can we go on unless there is a renewed emphasis on prayer today?

    Emphasize prayer all you want. Double how much prayer Christians perform. Triple it. We don’t care. What we care about is when you try and make government establish your prayers.

    Right now, I’m trying to renew my kid’s emphasis on music. There’s nothing wrong with that. The difference between you and me is, I have no plans to force you to participate or listen to my family’s renewed emphasis.

  • matty1

    “54 bottles of Madeira, 60 bottles of claret, eight of whiskey, 22 of porter, eight of hard cider, 12 of beer, and seven bowls of alcoholic punch.” There were 55 of them.

    So what did the other 54 drink?

  • otrame

    It was Franklin, his kid, that wrote that. I doubt Billy ever even saw it, much less approved it.

  • blf

    Billy Graham Lies About History

    Omit needless words!

  • colnago80

    Re otrame @ #4

    It is my information that Graham is senile and, in all probability you are correct that it was written by Franklin, who is a two fisted theocrat and teabagger.

  • Artor

    The headline, of course, is two words too long.

  • http://en.uncyclopedia.co/wiki/User:Modusoperandi Modusoperandi

    He leaves out just one tiny little fact: Franklin’s motion for prayer was ignored by the other attendees at the Constitutional Convention and that prayer he proposed, to bring together the two fractious sides, never took place.

    And that failure to pray lead to Obamacare. Checkmate, Causality!

  • otrame

    It is so much easier to trade on the fame of your Daddy if he is incapacitated and unable to defend himself. My own father is seriously demented, so Franklin’s abuse of his father seems particularly odious to me. Odious, but not in the least surprising.

  • observer

    Jesus’s instruction to not pray like the hypocrites is clearly not an injunction against *all* public prayer. After all, he does teach the same crowd how to pray what we now call The Lord’s Prayer. The concern is to not use prayer as a demonstration of public piety.

  • observer

    There’s some discussion of Benjamin Franklin’s call for prayer in the new book, Nature’s God. According to its author, there’s reason to think Franklin’s suggestion had a bit of ironic humor intended.

  • anubisprime

    “Breaking news…geriatric evangelist lies about reality…read all about it!”

  • matty1

    @10

    The concern is to not use prayer as a demonstration of public piety.

    You mean by, for example, writing articles about how ‘leaders of nations’ ought to pray in public?

  • matty1

    Wait, I just spotted something at the end of the article ©1962

    That’s 1962 – presumably back when Billy was able to write his own words.

  • guychapman

    Would it be cruel, do you think, to point out to him that the founding fathers included atheists and deists as well as Christians, and that one of the foundational principles of the United States was that citizens be free to enjoy any religion, or none, not least because many of them were themselves fleeing from the intolerance of sectarian Christianity?

  • matty1

    @15 Are you sure about your timescales here? Some of the Colonies were indeed founded by people fleeing the imposition of other people’s religion but by 1776 the 13 colonies were well established and it seems unlikely their leaders were recent refugees.

  • abb3w

    As a quibble, it wasn’t quite ignored — the motion was seconded by Roger Sherman, with a modified form suggested by Edmund Randolph and seconded by Franklin. And then both motions were tabled by adjournment and ignored.

    @11, observer

    There’s some discussion of Benjamin Franklin’s call for prayer in the new book, Nature’s God. According to its author, there’s reason to think Franklin’s suggestion had a bit of ironic humor intended.

    A multi-century old example of Poe’s Law?

    The treatment reminds me of the reaction at the convention to another of Ben’s proposals: “It was treated with great respect, but rather for the author of it, than from any apparent conviction of its expediency or practicability.” As such, my impression is more that it was genuine… and largely taken as a sign of his failing wits.

    Still, this attempt by Graham seems a lot better than most efforts at social validation via quote mining — rather than being fabricated outright, the quote appears to match the text from Madison’s notes, and even matches the sentiment of Franklin… if not the majority of the other delegates.

  • http://www.clanfield.net janiceintoronto

    Isn’t the old fraud dead yet? Is he actually an animatronic character run by some really flawed software?

    Robertson, hmmm sorta sounds like Robot, don’t it? Fetch the tinfoil, I feel a spell coming on again…

  • dan4

    @10 “The concern is not to use prayer as a demonstration of public piety.” Huh? Praying publicly IS, by very definition of those two words, a “demonstration of public piety.”