Peterson Thinks All Discrimination Laws are Wrong

I‘m generally not a fan of calling black conservatives “Uncle Toms” but if ever that term applied, it surely applies to Jesse Lee Peterson. On his radio show recently, he said that it was wrong for black civil rights activists to hold sit-ins at white-owned businesses that didn’t want them there and wrong to force those businesses to serve them.

“It was wrong during the so-called Civil Rights Movement,” Peterson said, “when they forced private white businesses like cafes and restaurants and things like that, when they allowed black people to do sit-ins on private white businesses, those folks who did not want black people in there.”

Arguing that any business owner that wanted to refuse service to black customers had every right to do so, Peterson said that “it was wrong to let blacks do sit-ins on private businesses.”

“You can’t take away someone else’s freedom like that just to make someone else feel good,” he said.

Staggering.

httpv://youtu.be/2jb02XNjvcw

"We have a division of Waffen SS to keep you down......Would you believe a bunch ..."

Kilmeade: NFL Players Creating ‘Chaos’ by ..."
"This unvetted weirdo got even closer to a president:http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2013/12/11/250179179/fake-sign-language-interpreter-marred-mandela-memorial"

Trump Wars 4: A New Hope
"1)The egg does not get fertilized the night she has sex. 2) At that point ..."

The ‘We Should Just Ignore Them’ ..."
Follow Us!
POPULAR AT PATHEOS Nonreligious
What Are Your Thoughts?leave a comment
  • eric

    I find it somewhat curious and amazing that the emotional opposition to gay rights is so strong with some folks, that they would literally roll back 50 years of equal rights laws against much larger sections of the popultion just to prevent it.

    Cut off your nose to spite your face, indeed.

  • kantalope

    I think he just sees a publishing opportunity and wants to bring back: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Negro_Motorist_Green_Book

  • brucegee1962

    A black acquaintance of mine had the same belief, mainly influenced by extreme libertarianism. I suppose, if you’re both black and libertarian, you kind of have to believe this or else be a hypocrite. Personally, it makes me think that perhaps being a hypocrite is a lesser personality failing than being a libertarian.

  • http://en.uncyclopedia.co/wiki/User:Modusoperandi Modusoperandi

    Also, it was wrong for them to mooch on public services, like Occupy Bus Seat (not to mention them hogging all the police dogs and firehoses!). And sometimes they’d be truly lazy and just hang off trees by their necks!

  • dugglebogey

    It seems like he’s only against those things post facto in the context of denying homosexuals of their civil rights.

  • eric

    I suppose it could be seen as a wierd sign of success. Analogous to the anti-vaccine movement being possible due to everyone forgetting just how bad those diseases were, I think what we may be seeing here is libertarians forgetting just how bad pre-civil rights discrimination was.

  • busterggi

    That’s what happens when a generation comes along that didn’t have to fight for its rights – they don’t know what it was like to not have them. Probably believes the Civil War had nothing to do with slavery too.

  • http://Reallyawakeguy.blogspot.com somnus

    Yeah, it was all about making black folks “feel better,” and nothing to do with the fact that people were being denied economic opportunity and access to essential goods and services just because the people who controlled access were bigots.

  • Reginald Selkirk

    Off-topic: Say, Ed, what are you doing on November 1, 2014?

    Creationist conference at Michigan State University

  • Chiroptera

    …Peterson said that “it was wrong to let blacks do sit-ins on private businesses.”

    Well, if I recall correctly, no one let them do sit-ins. In most of the cases, they were arrested for “trespassing” and “disturbing the peace” and some such.

  • http://www.pandasthumb.org Area Man

    I think what we may be seeing here is libertarians forgetting just how bad pre-civil rights discrimination was.

    Much of libertarianism requires being oblivious the fact that we used to do things their way, and it didn’t work. They don’t need empiricism when they’ve got theory.

  • Doubting Thomas

    Goodness, who let this negro use our whites only airwaves?

  • https://www.facebook.com/dale.l.peebles Dale Peebles

    Scott Lemieux at Lawyers, Guns & Money notes that “requiring public accommodations to serve customers with the ability to pay on equal terms” has a long tradition in common law:

    [I]f an inn-keeper, or other victualler, hangs out a sign and opens his house for travelers, it is an implied engagement to entertain all persons who travel that way; and upon this universal assumpsit an action on the case will lie against him for damages, if he without good reason refuses to admit a traveler.

    –Sir William Blackstone, Commentaries on the Laws of England

  • scienceavenger

    Much of libertarianism requires being oblivious the fact that we used to do things their way, and it didn’t work. They don’t need empiricism when they’ve got theory.

    This.

    Also, Libertarians tend to restrict their analysis to the seller and the buyer, ignoring that said transactions will cause other people to alter their behavior in significant ways. Thus, libertarians think Klandude’s whites-only business will lose in the marketplace to Freedomdude’s come-one-come-all business because Freedomdude should have a larger customer base. They ignore that in many places there is a sizeable chunk of the populace that will avoid Freedomdude’s business and go to Klandude’s instead once they see all of “them” at Freedomdude’s place. The libertarians can’t (or won’t) grasp that the free market cannot fix a situation where the racists outnumber the oppressed race.

  • http://timgueguen.blogspot.com timgueguen

    Peterson was born in 1949. He’s more than old enough to remember what things were like in the ’50s and ’60s. I wonder what the Peterson of 1969 would think of the Peterson of 2014.

  • tbp1

    As a whiter than white dude myself, I don’t think I’ve ever used the phrase “Uncle Tom” in public (although I may have thought it a few times). It just doesn’t seem appropriate.

    However, I would be more than willing to make an exception for this guy.

  • http://Reallyawakeguy.blogspot.com somnus

    @14. “The libertarians can’t (or won’t) grasp that the free market cannot fix a situation where the racists outnumber the oppressed race.”

    Based on the arguments I’ve seen advanced by some Libertarians, some will go so far as to say that if the market doesn’t correct a problem, then it is by definition not a real problem. E.g., if the market allows bigotry to flourish, then bigotry must be good.

  • brucegee1962

    I dislike the term “Uncle Tom” because it does such an injustice to the work it was derived from.

    Stowe’s Uncle Tom literally chose violent martyrdom in order to protect a fugitive slave. That’s about as far from the popular usage of the term as it is possible to be.

    Though the work has its flaws, I think it deserves credit as perhaps the most successful work of political propaganda ever written. We could use more authors like her today.

  • Michael Heath

    Libertarianism properly applied doesn’t require you to side business owners at the expense of some consumer groups. Instead such arguments reveal the type of people that are attracted to libertarianism.

    It’s similar to the relationship conservative Christians have with the Beatitudes, though not that bad.

  • iangould

    But it was right for governments to force businesses to segregate and right for whites to enforce it through threats of boycotts and violence against business owners.

  • Akira MacKenzie

    Thus, libertarians think Klandude’s whites-only business will lose in the marketplace to Freedomdude’s come-one-come-all business because Freedomdude should have a larger customer base.

    And when it doesn’t, well, who is government to make people associate with people they don’t like? Freedom doesn’t mean everyone will be treated nicely or equally, it just means people will be free. (Sound familiar?) If racism is popular and profitable, then the people and the market have spoken!

  • Broken Things

    This past week the North Carolina Green Party had booth at the NC State Fair. We were collecting signatures for ballot access. Twice African Americans refused to sign because we supported equal marriage rights.

  • Alverant

    I wonder if he’d say the same thing if a business fired a christian pharmacist for not selling birth control pills. In my experience those who are against discrimination laws are willing to make an exception for their (and only their) religion.

  • colnago80

    Patterson is a self hating Afro-American in the tradition of self hating Jews like Max Blumenthal and Glenn Greenwald.

  • abb3w

    @11ses, Area Man:

    Much of libertarianism requires being oblivious the fact that we used to do things their way, and it didn’t work. They don’t need empiricism when they’ve got theory.

    Oh-so-much this. There also seems a particular level of confusion in their thinking, between saying things prescriptively-OUGHT to be done certain ways, and that things expectationally-OUGHT to result as consequences of doing this instead of that.

    @14ish, scienceavenger

    Also, Libertarians tend to restrict their analysis to the seller and the buyer

    …and neglect the existence of market entry/exit costs, information costs, and externalities. They also tend to want to forget the extent that certain economic concepts exist fundamentally as capricious social constructs, particularly for concepts they’re especially enamored of.

    @21ward, Akira MacKenzie

    And when it doesn’t, well, who is government to make people associate with people they don’t like?

    Nuh-uh, it’s freedom OF association, not freedom FROM association!

  • Nick Gotts

    #24: Trust colnago80 to drag his obsessive hatreds into a thread at every ghost of an opportunity.