Steve King: No Gay People in Heaven

Rep. Steve King, one of the dullest men ever to serve in Congress, gave an interview to the Jefferson Herald newspaper in Iowa in which he criticized the Catholic Church for moving even a tiny bit toward treating gay people as human beings and said he didn’t expect to see any gay people in heaven.

Those assessments from the conservative western Iowa congressman came during his forceful takes on a preliminary document released by a collection of Catholic bishops that calls for broader acceptance of homosexuals and people who are divorced or living together without being married.

“I would say that what was a sin 2,000 years ago is a sin today, and we need to stick to that principle,” King said in an interview with The Jefferson Herald.

The report from the bishops — which at the time of the interview King said he had “picked up little pieces in the news” about — is not a final guiding document, and is expected to generate animated debate in the church worldwide.

“I owe it to Pope Francis to read it carefully and read it with precision before I pass judgment on it,” King said. “I would just say that in fact to pass judgment on his document seems a bit presumptuous as I hear myself say that.”

Among other things, the synod document says “homosexuals have gifts and qualities to offer to the Christian community,” and “with homosexual unions, there are instances where mutual assistance to the point of sacrifice is a valuable support in the life of these persons.” For the divorced, the report calls for “great respect.” And with regard to cohabitation, the working language includes the following thinking, “Such unions can display authentic family values or at least an inherent desire for them.”

King declined to say whether he thought divorce or cohabitation are sins.

“I think that I’ll not comment on that part,” King said. “I’ll just say that what was a sin 2,000 years ago is a sin today, and people that were condemned to hell 2,000 years ago, I don’t expect to meet them should I make it to heaven. So let’s stick with that principle.”

Gay people are relieved that they won’t have to deal with this bigoted prick after they die. Dealing with him on this planet is more than enough.

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  • roggg

    Might be the first thing King and I actually have in common. I also dont expect to meet any gay people in heaven.

  • raven

    …and said he didn’t expect to see any gay people in heaven.

    LOL.

    I don’t expect to see Steve King in heaven. Or Republicans. Or fundie xians.

    Then again, AFAWK, heaven doesn’t even exist. But if it did, I still wouldn’t expect to see those groups there.

    Steve King should be a bit worried though. If Brahma exists, his next life is going to be even more boring. As a tapeworm in a cow or bark beetle or something.

  • John Pieret

    By definition, if I find myself cooped up in some place with Steve King, that place is hell.

  • D. C. Sessions

    In the face of a cowardly Republican Party that is starting to backpedal on the subject of civil rights, it’s good to see some Republicans (Rep. King notably) keeping the Party’s hatred of minorities on the front burner.

  • matty1

    From a seance described in Life on the Mississippi by Mark Twain

    Q. Do all the good people go to your place?

    A. Yes.

    Q. You know my present way of life. Can you suggest any additions to it, in the way of crime, that will reasonably insure my going to some other place.

  • sugarfrosted

    In all likelihood, in the vacuous sense, there are no gays in heaven, since it doesn’t exist. Also, fuck you Steve King.

  • dingojack

    You know the old joke —

    A guy dies and goes to heaven, at the gates he meets St Peter, and latter says:

    “Listen my shift’s ending would you like me to show you around?” The guy says “sure why not?”

    First Peter shows him a gently sloping grassed field full of oiled naked guys exercising.

    “These are the Elysian Fields for those you call the Ancient Greeks”.

    Then he shows him a thatched mead hall on the edge of a spectacular crystal-clear fjord.

    “And this is Valhalla for Vikings”.

    Then he shows him a multi-tiered Pagoda in a beautifully manicured forest of bonsai pines.

    ” Here is the place of meditation for Japanese Buddhists between reincarnations”.

    And then a oasis garden of scented jasmine, oranges and olives.

    “This is paradise for the Muslims”.

    Suddenly the guy notices a huge stone wall — hundreds of feet high — enclosing an area of heaven.

    “What in there?” he asks.

    “Oh they’re the Catholics — they like to think they’re the only ones who get in”.

    Dingo

  • scienceavenger

    “I would say that what was a sin 2,000 years ago is a sin today, and we need to stick to that principle,” King said in an interview with The Jefferson Herald.

    I await King’s stoning of people working on the Sabbath post haste.

  • dugglebogey

    How many bigots would you expect to see in heaven? Because every one of them thinks they are going.

  • caseloweraz

    @Matty1:

    In addition, there is the old Twilight Zone episode in which a gangster is killed. He finds himself in a place where he can have all the women he wants. When he drinks, he never has a hangover. When he gambles, he always wins. Pretty soon, he’s going crazy with boredom. He informs the attendant, who appears when called, that he’s tired of Heaven and wants to go to “the other place.”

    Laughing gleefully, the attendant tells him, “This is the other place.”

  • Doubting Thomas

    I think that even before I realized I was an Atheist, I knew that all the people I liked or thought I’d want to hang around with were not going to be in heaven. The idea of spending eternity with a bunch of bible thumpers… Gaaah!

  • busterggi

    I don’t believe in Heaven but I’ve read what the bible says about it – it has gates made of pearl, gold streets, walls encrusted with all sorts of gems, gardens, fountains and lots of singing – the ultimate drag queen stag.

  • vereverum

    “I’ll just say that what was a sin 2,000 years ago is a sin today

    Eatin’ bacon.

  • Crimson Clupeidae

    Hah. Who does he think decorated the place?

  • sailor1031

    And with regard to cohabitation, the working language includes the following thinking, “Such unions can display authentic family values or at least an inherent desire for them.”

    RCC Inc needs to remember that until the 1300s they didn’t require couples to get formally married – unless they were of the ‘nobility'(i.e they had stolen everybody elses’s property more than a hundred years previously (google ‘common land’ and ‘enclosures’). A quick semiformal BS at the Lychgate and the ‘marriage’ was accomplished. There’s nothing new here!!

  • http://www.facebook.com/eo.raptor.3 eoraptor

    Twain also said that one should go to heaven for the climate, but to hell for the company.