Texas Wingnut Claims ‘Divine Appointment’

The Texas state legislature is chock full of Christian right extremists and Mark Keough, who is running unopposed for a state house seat, will be no exception. He’s the pastor of the The Woodlands Bible Church and says that he won the seat because of a “divine opponent.” And he sees his work as a legislator as an extension of his ministry.

Keough, 61, said that ultimately winning the House District 15 seat is the most exciting time of his life. He called it a “divine appointment,” and criticized local high-profile churches for being silent on important social and political issues.

“We do believe that, as an extension of The Woodlands Bible Church, that this is almost as if it was a ministry as well,” Keough said. “I approached it from that perspective. It sounds crazy, because you ask, ‘where is the separation of church and state?’ You tell me. Where is separation of church and state? It’s not there.

“Somebody is determining the values of this culture and they are determining the values of those who hold public office, that are determining the future of your children, grandchildren and you. If the people in this position, as pastors and as Christian leaders, refuse to say anything, who is going to determine the perspective by which everybody lives, breathes and acts? The secularists, the humanists, the socialists. These are not empty words. This is what’s taking place.”

One has to wonder what universe he lives in. In the one the rest of us live in, the notion that secularists, humanists and socialists have taken over the country, and especially the state of Texas, is utterly delusional.

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  • D. C. Sessions

    In the one the rest of us live in, the notion that secularists, humanists and socialists have taken over the country, and especially the state of Texas, is utterly delusional.

    Sorta depends on your definition of “secularist,” doesn’t it?

    His probably involves the germ theory of disease, letting women vote and own property, and not burning witches or heretics. Among many other modern lies and distortions.

  • eric

    If the people in this position, as pastors and as Christian leaders, refuse to say anything, who is going to determine the perspective by which everybody lives, breathes and acts?

    Listen, you f*cking autocrat, speaking as a secular non-believer I don’t want anyone to “determine the perspective by which everybody lives, breathes and acts.” I want individuals to decide on their own perspective without it being forced upon them. Be a creationist if you want. Be anti-gay if you want. Just obey the law and don’t force your views on others.

    Is that really so hard to fathom?

  • Chiroptera

    “Somebody is determining the values of this culture and they are determining the values of those who hold public office, that are determining the future of your children, grandchildren and you.”

    So the values one holds aren’t a matter of free-will? People burn in hell for eternity because other people determined their values? Is this what he’s saying?

  • John Pieret

    It sounds crazy

    Well, he’s right about that!

  • http://en.uncyclopedia.co/wiki/User:Modusoperandi Modusoperandi

    If the people in this position, as pastors and as Christian leaders, refuse to say anything, who is going to determine the perspective by which everybody lives, breathes and acts?

    BREATH PANELS!!! BREATH PANELS!!!

  • busterggi

    So he supports Obama, right? Because only god appoints elected officials.

  • John Pieret

    And he’s not alone:

    Lea Carawan, director of the Congressional Prayer Caucus Foundation:

    Carawan … told Arizona-based host Josh Bernstein this week that the American people and many churches have “bought into a very insidious lie, which is the misapplication, misinformation regarding that phrase, ‘the separation of church and state.’”

    “That is the death knell for our nation,” she said. “If the church of God, if the Christians do not engage in the public square and do not see that as their responsibility, their right and responsibility, then those that do not believe like us will absolutely fill the void. And what people don’t understand is that every nation will reflect somebody’s values. And up until now, it’s reflected Judeo-Christian values because the Christians have held to it and they’ve protected it every single generation. But if we do not protect it in our generation, if we buy this lie and we back out of the public square like we have for a decade or several decades now, we will find that we no longer have a free Republic. The threat is very real.”

    http://www.rightwingwatch.org/content/congressional-prayer-caucus-foundation-leader-church-state-separation-death-knell-our-nation#sthash.zaygsnix.dpuf

    Lordy! If the last several decades has been an example of what happens when the far Christian right backs out of the of the public square, we are in for a shitload of trouble.

  • NitricAcid

    So he has the right to be as theocratic as he wants, because it was clearly God’s will that he be appointed to the job? I hope he gets caught in some crime, so that it will also be God’s will that he be ejected from office.

  • D. C. Sessions

    HNO3, that only happens to Democrats. Theocrats are forgiven.

  • kantalope

    @7 I wonder how the Judeo’s felt about being protected by signs that said no Jews allowed?

  • Trebuchet

    He’s the pastor of the The Woodlands Bible Church and says that he won the seat because of a “divine opponent.”

    Sometimes Ed’s typos are awesome!

  • dingojack

    NitricAcid – No, no, not god. It’s a Divine* appointment!”

    Dingo

    ———

    * (run for office motherfucker, or I’ll shoot you where you stand!)

  • http://mostlyrational.net tacitus

    I have friends who lived a few miles from The Woodlands for a while, and as liberals and non-believers, they were a rare breed in that part of Texas. Every new introduction would include the query “What church do you go to?” with expressions of genuine surprise when they replied that they didn’t go to any. The folks were friendly enough if you avoided religion and politics, but I think they’re happy to be back in Austin all the same.

  • karmacat

    My brother lives in The Woodlands. There is a Unitarian church there. I wonder what Keogh thinks of it. My brother jokes that there are 2 parties in Texas, the right wing and the tea party right wing.