Mississippi Group Proposes ‘Christian State’ Amendment

A group in Mississippi has had ballot language approved for a referendum to add language to their state constitution declaring their reliance upon God and the Bible and many other controversial statements. They now need to get enough petition signatures to get it on the ballot.

Initiative 46 is backed by the Magnolia State Heritage Campaign and was approved by secretary of state Delbert Hosemann this month. The Magnolia State Heritage Campaign, led by Arthur Randallson, fought years ago in 2011 for similar changes but failed to get enough signatures to have the measure on the ballot…

This year, the group needs 107,216 Mississippians to sign the petition to have Initiative 46 added to the 2016 ballot between now and October 2015. Some of the most controversial elements of the initiative include: recognizing April as Confederate History Month, adding the Confederate battle flag to fly at the capitol in Jackson and all public buildings, making English the state’s official language, confirming Dixie as the state song and acknowledging Christianity as the state’s principal religion.

Frankly, I’m surprised this kind of language wasn’t already in the Mississippi constitution. Many state constitutions include such religious language. Once again, some Christians feel the need to piss on their territory to declare it their own and let non-Christians know that they only exist there due to the overwhelming magnanimity of the Christian majority.

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  • Kevin Kehres

    Gee, wouldn’t that contradict the Treaty of Tripoli? Which would make it unConstitutional, since treaties are Supreme Law Of The Land?

    Here’s hoping that the Islamic community in Mississippi (5,000 out of the state’s 3 million population) gets together and draft a counter proposal.

  • dingojack

    They should voluntarily form part of the Confederated micro-States of (St.) Reagan?

    That would keep ’em happy!

    @@

    Dingo

  • davefitz

    Sounds like a perfectly good waste of time and tax payer money.

    “Once again, some Christians feel the need to piss on their territory to declare it their own and let non-Christians know that they only exist there due to the overwhelming magnanimity of the Christian majority.”

    I think this is more in response to the fear of their (so slowly) shrinking majority. Lower church attendance, Muslims everywhere, gay marriage? They’re just trying to maintain their hegemony.

  • http://en.uncyclopedia.co/wiki/User:Modusoperandi Modusoperandi

    I don’t see what’s so bad about it. They just want to celebrate and enshrine Southern History. Is that so wrong?

  • Artor

    Gosh, Mississippi is full of Xians and rednecks? I’m glad someone put together this petition to let everyone know. That might have remained a secret otherwise.

  • dingojack

    MO – Laugh it up chuckles, we know which side history is on.

    >8( Dingo

  • http://festeringscabofrealityblogspot.com fifthdentist

    You guys have already been there, done that.

    “We, the people of the Confederate States, each State acting in its sovereign and independent character, in order to form a permanent federal government, establish justice, insure domestic tranquility, and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity invoking the favor and guidance of Almighty God do ordain and establish this Constitution for the Confederate States of America.”

  • Dave Maier

    Let’s make a deal: you guys get to have April be Confederate History Month, and we get a real historian to decide what we teach the kiddies about it.

  • Pierce R. Butler

    … acknowledging Christianity as the state’s principal religion.

    Not mandating it as the state’s only religion?!?

    The Magnolia State Heritage Campaign has been infiltrated by damn yankee heathen librulz!

  • matty1

    Gee, wouldn’t that contradict the Treaty of Tripoli? Which would make it unConstitutional, since treaties are Supreme Law Of The Land?

    Genuine question here. Is a treaty still legally binding if one of the parties no longer exists? Or is the current Lybian government considered successor to the Bey if Tripoli?

  • fleetfootphilo

    They now need to get enough petition signatures to get it on the ballot.

    Something tells me that’s going to be too tough in Mississippi

  • fleetfootphilo

    That is, it’s NOT going to be too tough in Mississippi

  • busterggi

    “Frankly, I’m surprised this kind of language wasn’t already in the Mississippi constitution. ”

    First there had to be enough Mississipians to be literate.

  • http://www.facebook.com/den.wilson d.c.wilson

    It’s rather fitting that, as we approach the end of daylight savings time, Mississippi wants to set their clocks back to 1860.

  • markr1957

    The question is – can they find 107,216 people in Mississippi who can read the petition to know they want to sign it?

  • whheydt

    Re: matty1 @ #10…

    Probably depends…if there’s money from–or even just a lack of war with–the US involved, then they’d probably agree to be a successor government. If they have to pay us for violating the treaty, then they probably aren’t going to admit to being a successor government.

    As a matter of law, it would probably depend on how the intervening changes of government were structured. For instance, when the current US constitution was written, it was explicitly stated that the new government would be responsible for debts incurred by the previous (Articles of Confederation) one.

  • whheydt

    Re: markr1957 @ #15….

    Evidence from the sorts of things that get on the ballot would suggest that there are plenty of people who will sign a petition without having the slightest idea what is contained in it, let alone actually *reading* the proposed measure. (And don’t for a minute suppose that most of that small number who read it understand it…let alone the ramifications of it.)

  • http://festeringscabofrealityblogspot.com fifthdentist

    @ 15,

    They can just tell them to sign it if you love Jesus and everybody will make their “X” on the dotted line.

  • eamick

    To their (slight) credit, the initiative also includes a provision that prevents the state’s historically black colleges from being forced to merge or consolidate. Then again, they proclaim, complete with tedious descriptions, that all of the state-run colleges’ current mascots and related symbols shall be left as is; the goal is obviously to keep the Confederacy-oriented symbols of Ole Miss.

  • http://www.gregory-gadow.net Gregory in Seattle

    This stuff makes me so very glad that the Washington State constitution cannot be amended by initiative.

  • Pierce R. Butler

    Normally I’m the first to pile on when my native state commits yet another embarrassment, but would y’all please RTFP:

    in 2011 … failed to get enough signatures

    Not having lived there in a long time, I can only guess that the combination of Yankee immigration, consistent failure of Republicans at multiple levels of government, organizing by the black community and/or the Democratic Party, the internet and other modernizing influences has finally begun making a difference in the land of magnolias, moonshine, and madness.

    Or the petition-pushers just screwed dat pooch, what with Benghazi comin’ up and gays gettin’ hitched somewhars.

  • John Pieret

    It’s kinda strange but this part of the initiative is likely to run afoul of the Voting Rights Act:

    English shall be the official language of the State of Mississippi. All governmental or public non-emergency or non-judicial services, functions, or communications in Mississippi shall be rendered in the English language only, except for specific foreign language instruction in public schools, and except for the option of Latin or French for jurisprudence, medicine, heraldry, and other traditional uses.

    It seems 10 counties in the state are required to publish voting materials in Choctaw.

  • howardhershey

    They now need to get enough petition signatures to get it on the ballot.

    Something tells me that’s going to be too tough in Mississippi.

    How do you tell one X used as a signature from another?

  • whheydt

    Re: John Pieret @ #22…

    Wonder how many heads will explode when these guys are told about how much of the English language is borrowed from other languages…and how many other languages are involved…

  • http://www.ranum.com Marcus Ranum

    Haven’t they figured out that god let them lose the civil war for a reason?

  • http://festeringscabofrealityblogspot.com fifthdentist

    @ Marcus,

    Probably not, as they haven’t yet figured out that the CSA actually lost that war.