Fischer Explains Why Muslim God is Not the Christian God

Let’s face it, Bryan Fischer just isn’t that bright. And he’s so tribalistic and ideologically rigid that he’s completely incapable of recognizing the inconsistencies in his own claim (like claiming that the 1st Amendment only applies to Congress, then saying that the city of Houston is destroying that amendment). Here’s another perfect example:

By “God,” of course, the Muslims refer to Allah, the god of Islam. Now make no mistake: Allah is not the God of Christianity, for our God has a Son while their god does not. Muslims regard the claim that Allah has a Son as rank heresy and blasphemy. In many Muslim countries, they will cut your head off for even believing it.

On top of that, Christians worship Christ himself as God. Muslims do not. So it is plainly self-evident that we do not worship the same God our Muslim enemies do.

Hey, you know who else doesn’t believe that God has a son and doesn’t worship Christ? The Jews. Which means all your endless blather about “Judeo-Christianity” has just been proven to be bullshit by your own reasoning. Not that you’ll recognize that, of course, because you are completely oblivious to your own contradictions. That’s why I’ve named an award after you honoring that very trait.

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  • busterggi

    Technically ancient Hebrews did believe that their chief god El had many sons including Yahweh. They prefer to pretend their book doesn’t say that.

  • Chiroptera

    Now make no mistake: Allah is not the God of Christianity….

    This is incorrect: there is only one empty set.

    Ha ha ha ha. Math joke.

  • birgerjohansson

    Actually, both Allah and Yaweh are minions/facets of that old trickster, N´yarl-ath Hotep.

  • raven

    Let’s face it, Bryan Fischer just isn’t that bright.

    That is a feature not a bug.

    How else could you drone on day after day with simple minded nonsense while contradicting yourself, without getting bored or laughing a lot?

    Oddly enough, I agree with him though. They really are pretty different. About all they have in common is that they are, AFAWK, both imaginary. Then again, the xian god seems to have enough different versions that you could say there are lots of them running around.

  • colnago80

    By “God,” of course, the Muslims refer to Allah, the god of Islam. Now make no mistake: Allah is not the God of Christianity, for our God has a Son while their god does not.

    Well, the blogs resident physics professor and former math department chairman says the same thing.

  • dingojack

    Who knew Cronus* was a god Christians revered?

    @@

    Dingo

    ——–

    * Or Osiris, or many others.

  • John Pieret

    From the article:

    The October 28 New York Times features a story about how our Muslim enemies in Iraq and Syria have acquired sophisticated surface-to-air missiles, some of Chinese manufacture and others made by Russia.

    The real takeaway, though, from the article is the following pull quote. Referring to written instructions regarding the use of these missiles, we are told, “The authors urged ‘strong confidence in God and composure,’ and certainty ‘that this operation will cause a disaster to the foes and destroy their arrogance.’” (Emphasis mine [Fischer’s].)

    Well, thank goodness! Since they are trusting in the “wrong” god, all those missiles will miss, right, Bryan?

  • He Who Shall Not Be Blamed

    @ Chiroptera #2:

    This is incorrect: there is only one empty set.

    THERE ARE NO LIGHTS!!!

  • Pierce R. Butler

    “Allah” is the Arabic term for God (more precisely, “Al-Lah” = “the god”).

    Arabic-speaking Christians pray to “Allah”, just as, e.g., Spanish-speaking Christians do to “El Dios”.

    Historically, the Jews worshipped “Yahveh”, “Elohim”, “Adonai”, etc – possibly one reason the pre-Jesus Big Cheeses decided the actual Name was too holy to speak and resorted to euphemisms such as “The Lord” (aka Ba’al, a title also claimed by other local divinities).

    If you can’t take the confusion, get out of the temple!

  • John Pieret

    Which means all your endless blather about “Judeo-Christianity” has just been proven to be bullshit by your own reasoning.

    Not that it has to do with reasoning but later in the article he just abducts Yahweh into Christianity:

    Another commander-in-chief of long ago, who was virtually undefeated in battle, wrote, “Some trust in chariots and some in horses, but we trust in the name of the Lord (lit. ‘Yahweh’) our God” (Psalm 20:7).

    See? Even if they didn’t know it, Jews were worshiping Jesus all along … though why the Muslims don’t get included is rather obscure …

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100002686842900 ChristineRose

    There’s a theory that Islam arose out of an Arabic-speaking Christian community which was turned off by growing trend of deifying Jesus. These people wouldn’t have had much access to the growing body of Christian literature, so they wrote their own, and they made a point of not being Catholics. Nobody really has much clue what the historic Jesus taught, but there’s a respectable chance he would have been happier with Islam than with Christianity had he lived to see what happened.

  • Nick Gotts

    the blogs resident physics professor and former math department chairman – colnago80

    Maybe it’s different in the USA, but in the UK almost all university department heads are delighted when their term ends: heading the department means spending most of your time in committee meetings and administrative chores.

  • dukeofomnium

    I actually think Fischer’s right. Christiangod has a son (and is a son); Allah “begetteth not.” This means that the two gods have different, mutually exclusive attributes.

    The two gods do have a common root myth, of course, but because they have mutually exclusive attributes, they’re not actually the same.

    Note that this position implies that both gods do have the attributes that their followers impute to them. Gods, as imaginary beings, cannot get attributes in any other way.

  • some bastard on the internet

    John Pieret’s quote @10

    Another commander-in-chief of long ago, who was virtually undefeated in battle, wrote, “Some trust in chariots and some in horses, but we trust in the name of the Lord (lit. ‘Yahweh’) our God” (Psalm 20:7).

    After that, of course, they spent the next few hours grumbling to themselves, “Shoulda picked the chariots, we shoulda picked the damn chariots…”

  • Nick Gotts

    ChristineRose@11,

    Tom Holland, in The Shadow of the Sword argues that both Christianity and Judaism as we know them today were still in the process of formation around the time Islam came on the scene – and Manichaeism was also still a living religion. Ideas and stories were swapped between all of these, and indeed with Mazdaism, the revived and reformulated Zoroastrianism of Sassanid Persia. A lot of his claims are controversial, but certainly there was a lot of variety in the Christianity of the time, particularly with regard to the nature of Jesus.

  • Sastra

    ChristineRose #11 wrote:

    Nobody really has much clue what the historic Jesus taught, but there’s a respectable chance he would have been happier with Islam than with Christianity had he lived to see what happened.

    Fortunately, there have been breaking developments on this question, and the truth is in.

  • colnago80

    Re Nick Gotts @ #12

    It ain’t much different over here on the other side of the pond. However, in my experience, most of the faculty in university math departments wouldn’t be thrilled with a physicist being appointed department chair (and to be fair, vice versa).

  • dhall

    #16 – Sastra – Nice; thanks for the link. Reading it might irritate a whole lot of people, Christians and Muslims–and Jews-For-Jesus . . . Highlights the all around idiocy of religion too.

  • matty1

    It’s always struck me as something of a non-question given we are dealing with fictional characters. If I write a story about a wizard called Harry Potter is my Potter the same person as Rowling’s? What if I turn him into an alien or rename him Gary Potter – how different does the new story need to be to say that character is different?

  • Al Dente

    The October 28 New York Times features a story about how our Muslim enemies in Iraq and Syria have acquired sophisticated surface-to-air missiles, some of Chinese manufacture and others made by Russia.

    Fischer has probably forgotten that St. Ronnie Reagan sold Hawk SAMs and TOW anti-tank missiles to Iran.

  • sigurd jorsalfar

    I’m glad that that’s finally been straightened out.

  • Nick Gotts

    Sastra@18,

    LOL. I particularly liked the last line:

    Neither the Father nor the Holy Ghost could be reached for comment.

  • http://heb712.blogspot.com heddle

    NG,

    Maybe it’s different in the USA, but in the UK almost all university department heads are delighted when their term ends: heading the department means spending most of your time in committee meetings and administrative chores.

    That is mostly true. I was delighted to get back to my own department and to my research. However, some people, oddly enough, like the job. Not me. I’ve always been a follower, not a leader.

    colnago80,

    However, in my experience, most of the faculty in university math departments wouldn’t be thrilled with a physicist being appointed department chair (and to be fair, vice versa).

    All things being equal of course both the department and the administration would prefer a mathematician to be the math chair. There were special circumstances in this case. So I was asked and agreed to chair the department for two years. I like to think I left the department in at least a little better shape–shepherding through a new major in computational and applied math and conducting successful searches for new faculty. I also think my relations with the math department were and are quite good. But I guess you’d have to ask them.

    As for the post, I think the question of whether the Muslim god is the Hebrew god is the Christian gos has two answers. You can make the case that they are anthropologically. Theologically they are not. If we all saw Jesus a Muslim would say: there is a prophet. A Jew would say something like: there is a misguided rabbi. A Christian would say: there is god. Not the same. Not to mention that to many Muslims and Jews Christianity is polytheistic.

  • birgerjohansson

    I prefer Tak, the god of the dwarwes.

    Tak does not require that you think of him, but Tak require that you think.

  • iangould

    Mormons have downplayed or actually rejected much of the teachings of Joseph Smith and Brigham Young so I’m unsure if this is still the case but at least at one point they denied the divinity of Christ.

    I wonder what Fischer thinks about that?

  • iangould

    “Arianism is the nontrinitarian, theological teaching attributed to Arius (c. AD 250–336), a Christian presbyter in Alexandria, Egypt, concerning the relationship of God the Father to the Son of God, Jesus Christ. Arius asserted that the Son of God was a subordinate entity to God the Father.”

    “Modern Christian groups which may be seen as espousing some of the principles of Arianism include Unitarians, Oneness Pentecostals, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Jehovah’s Witnesses, Iglesia ni Cristo and Branhamism, though the origins of their beliefs are not necessarily attributed to the teachings of Arius.[4] “Arianism” is also often used to refer to other nontrinitarian theological systems of the 4th century, which regarded Jesus Christ—the Son of God, the Logos—as either a created being (as in Arianism proper and Anomoeanism), or as neither uncreated nor created in the sense other beings are created (as in Semi-Arianism).”

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arianism