Texas Rep. Wants 10 Commandments in Public Schools

Rep. Dan Flynn in Texas has submitted a bill to allow the posting of the Ten Commandments in public schools in that state. HB 38 says:

POSTING OF TEN COMMANDMENTS. The board of trustees of an independent school district may not prohibit the posting of a copy of the Ten Commandments in a prominent location in a district classroom.

They just can’t stop trying to piss on their territory, can they?

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  • http://howlandbolton.com richardelguru

    I don’t see why they shouldn’t be posted, as long as they are in Hebrew (or the original Klingon).

  • John Pieret

    Um … Rep. Numbnutz … Texas has yet to (successfully) secede from the US. Passing that bill won’t make the posting of the 10 Commandments in public schools any less unconstitutional or insulate those school districts for being liable for the legal costs of the plaintiffs.

    Of course, he may not expect it to pass and may just be setting it up so he can tell his idiot constituents (as shown by the fact they elected him) that he tried.

  • Alverant

    And when he doesn’t get it, he’ll run to his supporters whining about some mythical oppression.

    Shouldn’t there be a law against this kind of blatant pandering?

  • http://en.uncyclopedia.co/wiki/User:Modusoperandi Modusoperandi

    On a related note, I’m going down to his church right now to put an Origin of Species monument in front it.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=701394965 patrickashton

    The proposed law only prevents the board of trustees from keeping the 10 Commandments out of classrooms. Why are they picking on the middleman? I thought it was the Constitution and those pesky judges who were forcing God out of our schools.

  • D. C. Sessions

    Of course, he may not expect it to pass and may just be setting it up so he can tell his idiot constituents (as shown by the fact they elected him) that he tried.

    Or better yet, it passes and then hundreds of schools get notified by their legal counsel (or insurers, or both) that this law isn’t worth the toilet paper it was drafted on. And a large number of those will go ahead anyway and get a series of summary judgments, with expenses awarded, against them. Whereupon politicans all over Texas will run against “unelected activist tyrants in black robes.” Mostly if not 100% successfully.

  • eric

    @2 (and @6):

    Passing that bill won’t make the posting of the 10 Commandments in public schools any less unconstitutional or insulate those school districts for being liable for the legal costs of the plaintiffs.

    Its possible to set up such a display and yet pass the Lemon test. The teacher could put it up as part of a many-beliefs historical display or just create an open forum wallspace in which it appears. So technically there may be a way or two to thread the needle and obey both this proposed state law and federal law. But we all know that’s not what Flynn intends.

  • John Pieret

    eric:

    Sure … but did the law say school districts had to allow displays of the 5 Pillars of Islam or readings from the Bagavit Ghita?

    But it would be fun to watch the exploding heads.

  • Sastra

    Just out of curiosity, I wonder how a bill demanding that public schools not be prohibited from placing a copy of the 10 Commandments in a hidden, secret location not to be disclosed or mentioned to students or staff would fare.

    It might be more likely to pass Constitutional muster, and it might even appeal to the magical thinking of Christian fundamentalists — who often seem to be thinking of Biblical relics as possessing mysterious, magical occult powers of protection. No more school shootings — Satan cannot enter!

    Hey, it’s no dumber than ceremoniously anointing student desks with holy oil after hours, which they have done. And lots of non-fundies will laugh at them, which feeds their special sense of persecution complex.

  • http://en.uncyclopedia.co/wiki/User:Modusoperandi Modusoperandi

    Sastra “Hey, it’s no dumber than ceremoniously anointing student desks with holy oil after hours…”

    Holy Oil After Hours, late night on Vatican TV…

  • John Pieret

    Modus:

    The Vatican already owns Holy Oil After Hours? Too bad … it would make a great Glam Rock band name.

  • http://en.uncyclopedia.co/wiki/User:Modusoperandi Modusoperandi

    John Pieret, too late. That was the name of the Pope’s house band. Also, House Band was one of the better albums by The Popes.

  • Kevin Kehres

    Catholic 10 Cs or Protestant 10Cs?

    It all depends. It’s OK if it’s Catholic 10Cs…because that’s historical stuff…and the founding fathers were all Catholics…at least that’s what the nuns told me…

    Those Protestant 10Cs are lies straight from the devil’s mouth.

  • jnorris

    I’m ok with the Texas law as long as Rep. Dan Flynn has to pay for the school districts lawyers and all fines with his own money.

  • http://drx.typepad.com Dr X

    Well if they create an open forum, I’ll erect my golden calf alongside the commandments.

  • marcus

    Dr X @15 You’ll have to leave room for my golden lingam. (The statue I mean.)

  • dingojack

    John Pieret (#8) – forget the Bagavit Ghita, how about readings from the Karma Sutra? (which segues nicely into:)

    Marcus is — GOLD MEMBER!!

    :) Dingo

  • John Pieret

    Dingo:

    Forget readings … pictures!

  • dingojack

    Pictures, surrounded by Roman winged Phalli (optima fellici!)

    Dingo

  • johnhodges

    The first seven of the ten C’s all carry the death penalty, and arguably the ninth as well. If the ten C’s are posted in any “open forum” I think the full text and the penalties should be posted as well. See

    http://www.atheistnexus.org/profiles/blogs/the-uncensored-ten

  • eric

    @8

    Sure … but did the law say school districts had to allow displays of the 5 Pillars of Islam or readings from the Bagavit Ghita?

    You’re saying the law wouldn’t pass the purpose prong. You are probably right. I can imagine some circumstance where it might, but I very much doubt such a circumstance is the case here.

  • abb3w

    Hm. Under this bill, would a district be able to require that any employee posting of a copy of the Ten Commandments anywhere in a district classroom assume (by notifying the board of the exact placement) full responsibility for ensuring that the display is in compliance with all applicable federal and state law, with “full responsibility” including full financial liability for any court judgement?

    Because I think we could work with that.

  • Georgia Sam

    @ Kevin K. 13: That gives me an idea. There are probably enough Hispanic Catholics in some Texas school districts to mount a strong movement in favor of posting the Catholic 10Cs rather than the Protestant version. That should get the right-wing theocrats’ knickers all twisted up.