Janet Bloomfield is a Horrible Human Being

You may know Janet Bloomfield, aka JudgyBitch, as the social media director for the MRA website A Voice for Men. After reading this article from her about the Bill Cosby rape allegations, I say without hesitation that she is an absolutely horrible human being. I’ve never liked terms like “sister punisher,” but it surely applies to her. I rarely get shocked these days by how vile someone can be, but this one left my jaw agape in disbelief, especially because it’s written by a woman.

Let me just state up front that I am not claiming innocence for Bill Cosby. Did he drug and rape a bunch of women? I don’t know, and neither does anybody else except for Bill himself. What I want to do today is talk about a few facts that should give everybody pause when it comes to judging him.

According to celebritynetworth.com, Bill Cosby is worth $400 million, and yes, it’s pertinent. That’s four hundred million incentives right there.

And yet only a couple of the (now) 20 women who have accused him of sexual assault have sued him. And this just proves my point when I wrote about Cosby’s attorney’s statement last week. Cosby’s attorney says that the fact that these women haven’t sued him is evidence that their allegations are false; now Bloomfield says (and the attorney would no doubt say as well) that the fact that Cosby is rich and could be sued is evidence that their allegations are false. Heads Cosby wins, tails his accusers lose.

Women who claim they were raped by Cosby also openly admit they were whoring for fame, trying to ride the man’s coattails into a star-studded future. Does that give Cosby the right to rape them? Of course not, but it sure as hell casts a suspicious light on the innocent maidens’ motives to make their claims.

Well yes, of course. Any young actress who auditioned or even met with Cosby to discuss possible projects was obviously just “whoring for fame.” And I’m sure that goes for any young male actor who ever auditioned? Oh right, this only applies to women. Every young woman who tries to get a part in any movie or TV show is a fame whore; young men who do the same are obviously not, amirite? And if a young man accused a powerful person in the entertainment industry of exploiting or victimizing them, they’d surely be described as “whoring for fame” and that fact would be used to undermine their credibility. Right? Right? Yeah, I didn’t think so.

The current witch-hunt in the media is a stark reminder that no matter how rich, how powerful, how well connected, or how critically acclaimed a man might be, even an accusation of rape can tear his life apart and destroy him. Proof? What proof? The word of a woman can destroy a man’s life with no evidence of any kind required. Rape shield laws should apply to the accused, not the accuser. The accuser will go on to garner sympathy, appropriate pharmaceuticals, and a speaking engagement where she can discuss her terrible trauma, and the accused will be left with a shattered life even if all the allegations are proven to be outright lies…

Here is what needs to change: since allegations of sexual assault and rape carry such devastating penalties for the men accused of those crimes, it should be a crime to name a man period. Victims should file criminal charges and the accused should be granted anonymity until convicted. We need court-ordered and enforced anonymity for men accused of rape. For women accused of rape too. Without a conviction, without evidence, without proof, no one gets to call anyone else a rapist.

The feminist media has made it absolutely clear that they will override any considerations of due process or justice when it comes to slandering and libelling men accused of rape. They will abuse the power they have and that is unacceptable. If these individuals refuse to show restraint and chose their words carefully?

I say, gag the bitches.

Yes, rape victims are “bitches” who need to be “gagged.” I hope you’ll all join me in shouting a big “fuck you” to Janet Bloomfield. She’s right, of course, that false rape allegations really can ruin someone’s life. But it’s also true that false rape allegations are pretty damn rare and this is largely because virtually every woman who accuses someone of rape get metaphorically raped again by a criminal justice system that doesn’t take them seriously, by defense attorneys who claim that she couldn’t have been raped because she had a couple drinks earlier, by troglodytes who wonder what she was wearing as if that is in any way relevant. This is doubly true of a woman who accuses a rich and powerful man of raping her. Life is far more hellish for the millions of women who have actually been raped than it is for the relatively small number of men who have been falsely accused of it.

Seriously, I don’t know how this woman lives with herself. Is the admiration of misogynist assholes like Paul Elam really worth it?

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  • colnago80

    “But it’s also true that false rape allegations are pretty damn rare”

    They’re quite possibly not quite as rare as Brayton claims. They may, in fact, amount to 8% of the complaints that are filed.

    http://goo.gl/tMz1gF

  • matty1

    And if a young man accused a powerful person in the entertainment industry of exploiting or victimizing them, they’d surely be described as “whoring for fame” and that fact would be used to undermine their credibility. Right? Right? Yeah, I didn’t think so.

    It’s kind of the inverse but I was reading recently about a case where a (male actor) revealed he had been raped and his credibility was attacked. http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/dec/01/after-shia-lebeoufs-art-gallery-trauma-we-should-affirm-that-all-rapes-are-real-and-all-are-breaches-of-trust

    Not that this in any way makes Bloomfield’s comments any more acceptable or denies that women are much more likely to be rape victims buts please lets make sure we don’t accidentally demean any victim.

  • eric

    We need court-ordered and enforced anonymity for men accused of rape. For women accused of rape too. Without a conviction, without evidence, without proof, no one gets to call anyone else a rapist.

    Given that we already do this for kids accused of rape and it hasn’t negatively affected our justice system, I might be okay with it. JD accuses BC of rape for now, and you’ll get to know who JD and BC are after the case is over.

    Two problems with that idea spring to mind. The first is merely practical: this would offer zero actual protection for people like Bill Cosby, since the paparazzi are going to quickly figure it out. He’s still going to have to show up in court, and then the jig is up. The reason anonymity works for kids is because they are generally cases of only local interest anyway, not because anonymity makes it impossible (or even difficult) to figure out the accused and accusers.

    Second problem: there may be some unintended consequences, such as plea bargaining basically allowing rich people to escape justice (well, even more than they already can). Imagine how much worse the system would be if rich people could use monetary plea deals to buy media silence on whether there was even an allegation.

  • Donnie

    @3 Eric says:

    “Second problem: there may be some unintended consequences, such as plea bargaining basically allowing rich people to escape justice (well, even more than they already can). Imagine how much worse the system would be if rich people could use monetary plea deals to buy media silence on whether there was even an allegation.”

    JudgyBitch, Bill Crosby, He Who May not be named while wearing bicycle shorts, and others would consider that an important feature, not a critical bug in the system of indulgences.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=701394965 patrickashton

    Did he drug and rape a bunch of women? I don’t know, and neither does anybody else except for Bill himself.

    The women he supposedly raped might have something to say about that.

    Seriously, I don’t know how this woman lives with herself. Is the admiration of misogynist assholes like Paul Elam really worth it?

    Could this be a version of the Stockholm Syndrome, where a lifetime of living with misogynist men has made her admire them?

  • colnago80

    Re matty1 @ #2

    Unfortunately, in the case of LaBeouf, given his rather checkered career, a little skepticism is not unwarranted. He has been involved in a number of questionable incidents, including DUIs, barroom brawls, and public intoxication events, none of which enhance his credibility.

  • http://freethoughtblogs.com/amilliongods/ Avicenna

    Janet Bloomfield long ago passed the moral event horizon when she blamed the victims of the Jimmy Saville abuse. Her defence was “sometimes 13 year old girls look a lot more mature”. My defence?

    I agreed with her. Yes, some 13 year old girls look mature. I speak as someone best friend once dated a girl who was a minor. She lied about her age to him and me and I only found out her age when she accidentally let slip she was born 3 years before me. I was 18. They broke up that night and he went around to her house to tell her parents what had happened.

    But this is a young teenager with a rebellious streak and a fake ID getting into a place where she shouldn’t have with a young crowd of 18 to 25 year olds.

    We can call this an accident. Bad thinking on the part of the teenager but really teenagers are filled with bad plans and stupidity. The trick is to learn to stop doing those things.

    JImmy Saville molested children in hospitals in Paediatric wards. Where there are ONLY children. Judgy BItch is willing to throw these victims of a child molester under a bus to defend him simply because some teenagers go out and drink in bars underaged instead of drinking in parks like I did.

  • Michael Heath

    JanetBloomfield writes:

    Let me just state up front that I am not claiming innocence for Bill Cosby. Did he drug and rape a bunch of women? I don’t know, and neither does anybody else except for Bill himself.

    She’s de-humanized Mr. Cosby’s female accusers to the point their knowledge of what happened either doesn’t exist or it doesn’t count for anything. Wow, just wow.

  • http://dontlinkmebro F [i’m not here, i’m gone]

    Feminist media? LOLWTF.

    And women’s live have never been thrown into chaos because a man said something about them. No. Never. Not even over stuff that isn’t even a crime.

  • leftwingfox

    Colago80: So, 92% of women reporting rapes are telling the truth. Out of the twenty women who have accused Cosby, statistically we can expect maybe 2 of them to by lying.

    I’m also kind of curious how they define false reports. Do they mean malicious accusations only, or are they including faulty eyewitness identifications in cases of stranger rape? Unfortunately that article doesn’t define false report, and the paper is behind a paywall.

    According to RAINN.ORG only 10% of rapes reported to the police result in a conviction. For those falsely accused, the odds are strongly in their favour.

  • http://composer99.blogspot.ca composer99

    I don’t know, and neither does anybody else except for Bill himself.

    The amount of thoughtless misogyny packed in just that sentence is astonishing. The only way I can see how even JudgyBitch could have written it is by simply not thinking about what she was writing at all. (But maybe I’m overestimating her. It could be deliberate.)

  • karmacat

    colnago80 @ 1,

    Those false rape statistics can include people who have recanted because they don’t want to deal with the hostility towards victims. Sometimes police will put it in the false rape statistics if they don’t find enough evidence. http://freethoughtblogs.com/entequilaesverdad/2013/08/25/one-reason-why-false-rape-allegation-statistics-are-so-high/e

  • http://motherwell.livejournal.com/ Raging Bee

    Did he drug and rape a bunch of women? I don’t know, and neither does anybody else except for Bill himself.

    Yeah, rape victims NEVER know what happened to them. Only their male assailant(s) can explain it to them.

    …Bill Cosby is worth $400 million, and yes, it’s pertinent. That’s four hundred million incentives right there.

    And there you have the perfect, one-size-fits-all rationale to immunize ALL rich people from ANY criminal charges. I’m sure there’s lots of rich people who would gladly reward SleazyBitch for that defense. (And the “four hundred million incentives” bit sounds really stupid to boot: is she actually saying each dollar, in itself, is an incentive to make up a false rape charge?)

    Without a conviction, without evidence, without proof, no one gets to call anyone else a rapist.

    Funny how we don’t say that about any other crime. This is just another transparent pretext for preventing women from talking about their own experiences. Which is, I suspect, exactly what a lot of MRAs really do want — they absolutely loathe and despise the idea that women might be talking about them, so they’ll take any excuse they can to restrict and regulate such talk. Coming soon: new proposed laws to classify talking about a man’s penis size or sexual performance as “invasion of privacy.”

  • http://motherwell.livejournal.com/ Raging Bee

    Could this be a version of the Stockholm Syndrome, where a lifetime of living with misogynist men has made her admire them?

    That’s very possible. I think a lot of women simply live most or all of their lives in situations where it is quite simply easier, and less dangerous, to attack and blame women than to attack or blame men, regardless of any specific facts or evidence.

  • http://motherwell.livejournal.com/ Raging Bee

    Those false rape statistics can include people who have recanted because they don’t want to deal with the hostility towards victims. Sometimes police will put it in the false rape statistics if they don’t find enough evidence.

    Especially if the perp threatens legal actin against the victim unless his/her recantation includes words like “I lied.”

  • http://timgueguen.blogspot.com timgueguen

    If Cosby’s accusers were men the MRAs wouldn’t be defending him. They’d still find a way to blame women of course, if only by claiming that Cosby would have been stopped years ago if not for those horrible feminists ignoring crimes against men.

  • http://twitter.com/#!/TabbyLavalamp Tabby Lavalamp

    I don’t like “sister punisher” either. Most people don’t, which is why it never gained any traction (I’ve seen Slymers use it more than anyone when they want ways to denounce those mean “FTBullies”).

    I do, however, like to refer to anti-feminist (noting the “anti” isn’t a “non”) women as “schlaflies”.

  • dugglebogey

    Women are discouraged from being truthful about being raped for many reasons, such as fuckwads like Don Lemon who try to convince them they got raped because they didn’t fight back hard enough.

  • smrnda

    So, it’s totally plausible to her that someone might accuse a rich famous person of rape because of the $, but impossible that a famous and rich person might use their power and influence to rape women?

  • Rowan vet-tech

    @2-

    I really don’t know how to feel about that story (which worries me a little) in part because while he was doing a performance piece, NOTHING was stopping him from saying “no, I don’t consent to this”, or leaving. He wasn’t drugged, he wasn’t pressured, he wasn’t coerced, he wasn’t forced. He was doing a performance art where people were allowed to hurt him (there were whips in there), and he chose to continue his non-reaction when the sexual assault occurred.

    While it was definitely rape because he did not consent, his ‘staying in character’ just fucking boggles my mind.

  • Sastra

    I hope you’ll all join me in shouting a big “fuck you” to Janet Bloomfield.

    Especially if Tim Minchin has put it to music.

  • freemage

    I followed Colagno88’s link to the Slate article. Then I followed their link to the study that supposedly gives the 8% figure. Then I found the actual study with a fast Google, because the Slate link was borked. Then I discovered that the study in question used an odd term: “Unfounded” in giving that 8% rate. I was curious what, precisely, that means. Here’s the quote from Wikipedia:

    Bruce Gross of the Forensic Examiner says that:

    This statistic is almost meaningless, as many of the jurisdictions from which the FBI collects data on crime use different definitions of, or criteria for, “unfounded.” That is, a report of rape might be classified as unfounded (rather than as forcible rape) if the alleged victim did not try to fight off the suspect, if the alleged perpetrator did not use physical force or a weapon of some sort, if the alleged victim did not sustain any physical injuries, or if the alleged victim and the accused had a prior sexual relationship. Similarly, a report might be deemed unfounded if there is no physical evidence or too many inconsistencies between the accuser’s statement and what evidence does exist. As such, although some unfounded cases of rape may be false or fabricated, not all unfounded cases are false.[3]

    So the 8% figure comes from cases that were refused, not for being proven false, but for being unprosecutable. It also includes assaults that didn’t meet the ‘forcible rape’ definition. In short, colagno88 is not only a rape apologist piece of shit, he’s also a disingenuous fuckhead who tries to bury his ‘sources’ in order to keep anyone from finding out that he’s full of it. “8% unfounded” doesn’t mean what he wants you to think it means, and it may not mean anything at all.

  • http://www.pandasthumb.org Area Man

    I don’t really know what happened, and no one else does either, so I say we suspend judgement. And in the spirit of doing that, I will come up with many reasons why Bill Cosby is probably innocent, and why regardless of his guilt or innocence, he is clearly the real victim in all of this. And even better, because of my dedication to justice, I say we hold secret trials for people accused of rape and implement gag orders against members of the public who think they have a right to free speech. I’m a big fan of the rights of the accused, although not for crimes other than rape.

  • colnago80

    Re freemage @ #22

    Actually, the 8% figure comes from a rough average over a number of studies. However, suppose the number is much lower then that, say 2%. The problem is that even a few cases, especially high profile cases, can have a devastating affect on the credibility of cases that are not false. How many cases of actual rape were either not reported, or were kissed off by the authorities because there was nothing but he said/she said evidence, because of the Duke 4 case and the misconduct of the prosecutor, Mike Nifong? We need not go into the ins and outs of the William Kennedy Smith case or the Kobe Bryant case, the results of which certainly caused a number of victims to say, “what’s the use, the bum will get off”.

    Incidentally, the charge that defense attorneys slime the accuser is a lot less true then it used to be before rape shield laws went into effect. As it stands, in many states, the defense is not allowed to bring in allegations of prior sexual behavior of the accuser, which used to be something of a get out of jail free card for the accused.

  • Rowan vet-tech

    …. AHAHAHAHAHA. You honestly think that the Duke 4 case caused rapes to be not reported or brushed off by authorities, as if that never happened prior?

    AHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA*gasp*AHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA*wheeeze*HAHAHAHAHA….

    When I was 17, I was stalked by the guy who registered me to vote. He tried to break into my house; if he’d succeeded he’d most likely have raped and murdered me (because I knew exactly who he was, and the gov’t could find him easily). The only reason he didn’t succeed was because he was intimidated away by the two very large and very angry dogs that were *inside* the house with me. I was so abjectly terrified that I hid in a closet for 3 hours before I got up the courage to come out and call the police.

    The officer who responded told me that they would not be doing any follow up or investigating of the incident, because I had waited so long. “After all, after so much time how do I know you just didn’t simply have an argument with your boyfriend?”

    Your 8% is a piece of shit because it does include cases where the women decide to, or are pressured into, dropping charges. Or where the cops act like that asshole above.

    So, let’s split the difference: 5% of rapes reported are false. That means 95% are true. Whining about the 5% in the face of the fact that 95% of reported rapes are true, but of those only a miniscule percent make it to an arrest and trial, and only a tiny percent of THOSE cases result in a conviction just makes you a raging asshole so large that you probably have a galaxy orbiting around you.

  • mildlymagnificent

    I’m also kind of curious how they define false reports. Do they mean malicious accusations only, or are they including faulty eyewitness identifications in cases of stranger rape? Unfortunately that article doesn’t define false report, and the paper is behind a paywall.

    There are also problems with cases that aren’t prosecuted because they are “false accounts” rather than false reports. One kind of false account would be that the woman originally claimed to have had a couple of drinks, when further questioning reveals that she’d had a lot more than that. Rather than using that information to bolster the case that a rapist targeted a more vulnerable woman, it’s used to discount her story as unreliable. These cases, and others like them, can finish up in the false or unfounded statistics rather than in the more appropriate did-not-prosecute or case discontinued statistics.

  • rilian

    @rowan #20

    “He was doing a performance art where people were allowed to hurt him (there were whips in there), and he chose to continue his non-reaction when the sexual assault occurred.”

    Did he say people were allowed to hurt him? No, even if he did, it doesn’t count. Because has to be ongoing. When each person went in to see him, they didn’t know what he was thinking. Him just sitting there is not consent. Even if they were “allowed” to hurt him, it is immoral for them to do so without him saying “yes, do it, hit me” or w/e. Even if he did say right that second, “yes, hit me”, it still questionable. He might be in character? He might be acting? Then it wouldn’t be real consent. Besides which, he might out of his mind for some reason, like so upset that he’s not thinking straight, or on drugs or something, so I am not going to risk it. I am not going to hit someone just because they tell me to. They have the right to do that, to be hit, but they don’t have the right to make ME be the one hitting them.

  • Rowan vet-tech

    He said people were allowed to do whatever they wanted to him, and provided whips in the room he was sitting in. He was in an empty room (with a couple minders in a corner) and a table and the bench he was on and the people were told they could do whatever they wanted. He sat there with a bag over his head, completely non-reactive as a piece of performance art. He *provided* whips.

    For the non-sexual encounters, at any point he wasn’t okay with something, he could have told people to stop, or gotten up and walked away. He did not, because method or something. The same with his sexual assault. I do not deny, at all, that it was rape. He didn’t want it.

    What I don’t understand is why he DIDN”T BREAK CHARACTER? The potential reasons you list are valid, but I would really like the answer because his reaction in that setting doesn’t make sense to me.

    Of course, sitting in a room with a bag over my head and making a point of not reacting to people hitting me with provided whips also doesn’t make sense to me.

  • rilian

    @rowan #28

    “the people were told they could do whatever they wanted”

    I read otherwise.

    http://dlisted.com/2014/11/30/shia-labeoufs-performance-art-collaborators-speak-out-about-rape-allegations/

    ““A couple of important clarifications about our #IAMSORRY project earlier this year: Nowhere did we state that people could do whatever they wanted to Shia during #IAMSORRY. As soon as we were aware of the incident starting to occur, we put a stop to it and ensured that the woman left.””

  • Artor

    Why am I not surprised the Colnago80 is a rape apologist piece of shit? It must be Schickelgruber’s fault.

  • Rowan vet-tech

    Rilian, thank you for that bit of clarification on the situation. While I still don’t understand the refusal to break out of character (unless that too had been misreported), I’m glad to havea more accurate picture.

  • shay

    “They’re quite possibly not quite as rare as Brayton claims. They may, in fact, amount to 8% of the complaints that are filed.”

    How many of those are false reports rather than false accusations?