Corrupt Cop Won’t Be Charged. Film at 11.

If there are a million stories in the naked city, it seems like this story is about 900,000 of them. A police officer in California has been seized marijuana by the pound and then not filing reports on it, taking it home rather than turning it in as evidence. Local prosecutors are not going to charge him because, of course they’re not.

A Richmond police officer found with marijuana in his home earlier this year likely won’t be charged with a crime, authorities said, but his future on the police force is undetermined.

Veteran K-9 officer Joe Avila has been on paid administrative leave since September, pending an internal investigation, officials in the Richmond Police Department said.

The Contra Costa County District Attorney’s Office has been investigating since the case came to its attention earlier this year but is not inclined to file charges, said Robin Lipetzky, the county’s chief public defender. According to Lipetzky, the decision likely stems from evidence not strong enough to produce a conviction.

A search warrant affidavit obtained by this newspaper shows that Avila picked up a box containing about 4 to 5 pounds of marijuana from a UPS store on Nov. 25, 2013. Avila then radioed a dispatcher to say that he would file an incident report.

Avila never did so, according to the search warrant. Instead, in what several police sources have said is a violation of Richmond police policy, the marijuana ended up in his Oakley home instead of being placed into a department evidence locker…

During their search, police found marijuana in the home.

Don’t for a moment think this is unusual. In the famous Kathryn Johnson case in Atlanta, where police killed an 81-year old woman after coercing an informant into lying on an affidavit so they could get a no-knock warrant to bust into her house, the two officers who testified against the other cops said that they all carried drugs in the trunks of their squad cars. They used it to blackmail informants and suspects. Just another example of how the drug was has resulted in massive corruption in our law enforcement agencies.

And once again, the cop gets away with it. No charges even though they found large amounts of marijuana in his home, they have him on tape telling a dispatcher that he’ll file a report on it and the department says he didn’t do so then or in dozens of other cases. But he won’t be charged with the felonies he just committed. I doubt he’ll be fired either. Because cops are, for all practical purposes, usually above the law they are empowered to enforce.

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  • grumpyoldfart

    Joe Avila has been on paid administrative leave since September

    He must be heartbroken.

  • dingojack

    On the bright side — nobody died.

    Dingo

  • John Pieret

    the decision likely stems from evidence not strong enough to produce a conviction

    Whut? You mean if you find 4-5 lbs of marijuana that was not legally obtained in my house as a result of a legal search, you won’t charge me? Not even with possession of an illegal substance? That’s not evidence strong enough to produce a conviction?

    Wait! What am I thinking? I’m not a cop!

  • D. C. Sessions

    I, for one, welcome our new blue-clad overlords.

  • http://www.thelosersleague.com theschwa

    I love how police departments across the country are scratching their heads asking “Why don’t people trust us? Why are people afraid of us?”

  • Artor

    Schwa, not quite. It’s “How DARE they not trust us?!”

  • D. C. Sessions

    I love how police departments across the country are scratching their heads asking “Why don’t people trust us? Why are people afraid of us?”

    … as ordinary citizens raise their hands when they see them and slowly back away.

  • http://en.uncyclopedia.co/wiki/User:Modusoperandi Modusoperandi

    Oh, please! It’s just a few bad apples. Protected by the rest. And the System around them. But other than that, it’s all fine.

  • gog

    It takes me nigh a week to smoke a gram. What the fuck was he doing with five pounds?

  • http://en.uncyclopedia.co/wiki/User:Modusoperandi Modusoperandi

    gog “What the fuck was he doing with five pounds?”

    Keeping it off the street.

  • gog

    @Modusoperandi

    And a fine job he’s done.

  • Pianoman, Church of the Golden Retriever

    there’s nothing suspicious about a cop with 5 pounds of weed in his house not being prosecuted and sent to jail for 30 years just because, you know, everyone else in that situation would be.

  • raven

    Typical.

    We had a drug task force with no oversight.

    They seized a lot of drugs, money, and guns. No one knows what happened to them!!!

    Well, they do. The cops just took them and resold the guns and drugs and spent the money.

    They’ve been disbanded. And amazingly enough, one went to prison. He was proven to be planting evidence on innocent people and got caught when he planted it on someone in power’s buddy. Not smart. They had to let all of his cases out of prison after that

  • ShowMetheData

    Whut? You mean if you find 4-5 lbs of marijuana that was not legally obtained in my house as a result of a legal search, you won’t charge me? Not even with possession of an illegal substance? That’s not evidence strong enough to produce a conviction?

    No, it has to be a few indecipherably small seeds that mysteriously only appear in black people’s cars. Then the cop can trigger his dog when he wants to trigger an unnecessary search.

    Duh! Learn how the police really work.

  • had3

    I wonder how much weed one has to possess in California to be prosecuted for possession with intent to distribute? In Virginia, anything over a 1/2 oz is a felony punishable by up to 5 years, and more than 5lbs gets you up to 40.

  • smrnda

    It seems that cops get lighter penalties and less scrutiny than most. A wish would be that cops would be subject to an entirely different legal system, all spelled out. Harsher penalties than ordinary citizens, lower bar for evidence against them, fewer protections.

  • Pieter B, FCD

    his future on the police force is undetermined

    What

    The

    Actual

    Fuck?