Huckabee’s Psychological Projection

Mike Huckabee appeared on televangelist James Robison’s TV show to promote his new book and his inevitable presidential run in 2016 and he did what so many other Christian conservatives do — accused his opponents of the things he is most guilty of himself.

During an appearance on the Christian Life Today program, Huckabee told televangelist James Robinson (sic) that he was considering a 2016 presidential bid because the country needed to become a “God-centered nation that understands that our laws do not come from man, they come from God.”

“It’s the natural law of God,” the former Arkansas governor said, adding that he was not calling for a theocracy.

“We have a theocracy right now,” Robinson (sic) interrupted. “It’s a secular theocracy.”

“That’s it,” Huckabee agreed. “It’s a humanistic, atheistic, even antagonistic toward Christian faith. And that’s what we need to understand. Our basic, fundamental rights are being robbed from us, taken from us piece by piece.”

This has become the go-to rhetorical trick of the right. Whatever you are accused of, you accuse your opponents of the same thing. If you protest their bullying of gay people, you’re bullying them. If you want to prevent them from discriminating, you’re discriminating against them. If you want to prevent them from persecuting others, you’re persecuting them. And if you want to prevent them from imposing a Christian theocracy, you’re imposing a “secular theocracy” on them.

This is how they attempt to distract attention from the obvious contradiction in their own position. You can’t claim that you want our laws based on God and the Bible and then also claim you’re not advocating theocracy. Yes you are, by definition. So they try to deflect attention with this absurd rhetorical trick.

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  • Michael Heath

    Ed concludes:

    So they try to deflect attention with this absurd rhetorical trick.

    And it works!

  • http://drx.typepad.com Dr X

    This has become the go-to rhetorical trick of the right. Whatever you are accused of, you accuse your opponents of the same thing.

    IIRC, Science Avenger offered this analysis in a recent thread about Huckabee.

    I also associate this tactic with dumb people. As a kid, I noticed it was generally the less intelligent who went down this road. They can get away with saying flatly insane things like “We have a theocracy right now… It’s a secular theocracy.” It’s a cousin to you’re a bigot because you don’t like bigots and bigotry. I wish the mind had some mechanism that would make a person people faint immediately when they uttered a statement like that. Drop to the floor and slowly revive and reconsider their assault on sanity before they utter any more similarly ridiculous things. If they’re to dumb to figure out what’s wrong with their words, they’d have to stay silent to stay conscious. eh… I can dream.

  • http://drx.typepad.com Dr X

    Dr X,

    Should proofread carefully when writing about dumb people.

  • caseloweraz

    “We have a theocracy right now,” Robinson (sic) interrupted. “It’s a secular theocracy.”

    Yeah, a secular theocracy — that’s it, that’s the ticket!

    A secular theocracy is ruling this country: forcing people to believe whatever they choose to believe; censoring them by allowing them to talk about their beliefs in public forums; persecuting them by making them obey the same laws everybody else has to obey.

    And worst of all, it tyrannically prevents one particular group from imposing their doctrines on the rest. What vile, despicable despotism!

  • comfychair

    For the longest time I couldn’t shake the feeling that there was something just not right about Huckabee… I only recently figured out what it was. He’s missing the little toothbrush moustache.

  • linnaeus

    “This has become the go-to rhetorical trick of the right. Whatever you are accused of, you accuse your opponents of the same thing.”

    I call this the Peewee Herman defense.

    “I know you are, but what am I?”

  • grumpyoldfart

    they try to deflect attention with this absurd rhetorical trick

    They not only try, when it comes to their target audience, they succeed.