Christian Right Laywer Tries to Buck Up the Troops

For the past year or so, I’ve been greatly amused watching the anti-gay bigots pretend that they’ve still got a legitimate chance of preventing gay people from getting married. Even if the Supreme Court rules against it, I think it’s still virtually inevitable, it would just be delayed. Mario Diaz, an attorney with Concerned Women for America, does his best to buck up the troops as they’re clearly losing the battle:

A recent AP-GfK Poll on same-sex marriage presents to us a very different picture of this issue in America than what the elites in the liberal media, academia, government and especially Hollywood would have us believe.

When asked which way the United States Supreme Court should rule on its upcoming same-sex marriage cases, the country seems to be evenly divided, 48 to 48.

Wait. I thought “everyone” supported same-sex marriage. Don’t “they” tell us that only a fringe group holds on to the old idea that marriage is between one man and one woman before God in a commitment for life?

That’s a lovely strawman being beaten up. No one says that everyone supports same-sex marriage, but this particular poll is an outlier. Most polls over the last year or two show support for marriage equality at around 55%, with about 40% opposed and the rest undecided. And the trend is clearly on the side of equality. A decade ago it was more like 75-25 opposed to marriage equality. The change of public opinion has been remarkably fast.

But even if that weren’t the case, so what? It’s the Supreme Court dealing with this now, not a legislature, and they don’t have to worry about being elected to office. They’re appointed for life and thus insulated from the influence of public opinion.

The same-sex marriage inevitability myth is just that, a fantasy. It is just a tool the elite use to try to discourage supporters of marriage and win the argument by default. Even when the question of support for same-sex marriage was asked apart from the Supreme Court case, not even half, only 44 percent, support it. Thirty nine opposed it, and 15 percent stayed neutral.

That is hardly an “inevitability” picture. It is certainly a very different picture than what they show us on television and the laws that liberal politicians continue to ram through our legislatures.

You just keep telling yourself that, Mario.

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  • http://denkeensechtna.blogspot.com Deen

    Also note that “which way the United States Supreme Court should rule on its upcoming same-sex marriage cases” is a different question than “do you support same-sex marriage”. You can support gay marriage without thinking that the constitution’s equal protection clause mandates it.

  • raven

    Don’t “they” tell us that only a fringe group holds on to the old idea that marriage is between one man and one woman before God in a commitment for life?

    Same old lies.

    1. That hasn’t ever been true and is definitely not true in modern US society. Atheists and nonxians have been getting married since before xianity was invented. Even Commies get married.

    Divorce is common in the USA at 50%. It’s notably higher among the fundie xians. It’s lower among…atheists.

    2. Biblical marriage is between one guy and as many wives as he can round up and as many sex slaves as he can afford. It’s not legal in the USA.

    The kook lawyer can pretend that marriage is a committment before his god forever. No problem. What he can’t do is make us pretend!!!

  • dugglebogey

    It not so much about inevitability as it is about if and when it finally does come to pass, do you want to go down in history as on the side of the people fighting for the oppressed, or do you want to be on the side of the people holding the fire hoses.

  • scienceavenger

    The same-sex marriage inevitability myth is just that, a fantasy. It is just a tool the elite use to try to discourage supporters of marriage and win the argument by default.

    Sounds an awful lot like “the science isn’t settled”. These guys are in serious need of a new playbook.

  • http://en.uncyclopedia.co/wiki/User:Modusoperandi Modusoperandi

    What, Concerned Women for America has no lesbians?

  • Sastra

    The same-sex marriage inevitability myth is just that, a fantasy. It is just a tool the elite use to try to discourage supporters of marriage and win the argument by default.

    Nice to see him admit that even the deeply religious believers are guided by a need to follow the majority. Without constant social consensus and reinforcement, beliefs based on “faith” don’t really stand much of a chance.

    They’re not just afraid of being marginalized in American culture. They’re afraid that their own fellow conservative Christians will start to creep over into acceptance of gay marriage. In which case they’re cooked. They’ll be re-framed as distorting God’s will instead of following it.

  • eric

    not even half, only 44 percent, support it. Thirty nine opposed it, and 15 percent stayed neutral.

    Wow even his own poll doesn’t support his argument.

    I think this is why the fundies keep hoping for the world to end. Reality keeps disappointing them, popping their bubble.

  • Sastra

    By the way, is “Laywer” in the title a typo or a neologism, one that denies the Christian Right the right to use the word “law?”

  • Trebuchet

    Did you use the wrong consonant on “buck up”?

  • abb3w

    In addition to the lovely strawman, this poll is asking a subtly different question from the others. The oldest poll on this is from the GSS, asking an agree/disagree spectrum on “Homosexual couples should have the right to marry one another”; others have asked questions like “Do you think it should be legal or not legal for same-sex couples to marry?” (There’s a summary of a whole bunch here.)

    This poll, however, is asking about whether the Supreme Court should rule that it must — which may well cost the support of (or at least prime to oppose) a few conservatives who are personally okay with Gay Marriage, but that adamantly object to anything smacking of “Judicial Activism”.

  • U Frood

    While marriage activists are quick to say that the majority of Americans support same sex marriage (and even with this poll, that’s not far off), the opponents constantly say that EVERYONE hates gays.

  • Sastra

    When asked which way the United States Supreme Court should rule on its upcoming same-sex marriage cases…

    My first thought on seeing this question was that some people might misinterpret it as asking which way they think the Supreme Court is going to rule. As in “the cold snap should be gone by this weekend.”

  • abb3w

    Checking the rest of the topline, GfK also ask something nearer the usual favor/oppose “a law allowing same-sex couples to be legally married” (though question wording may polarize via fewer modest support/oppose). On the one hand, it’s a lot closer to the other gay marriage poll results; on the other, the results seem surprisingly flat over the last two years — the shift may have reached the saturation portion of the logistic curve.

    It would really, really suck if this ends up staying as polarized for the next forty years as abortion has for the last forty.

  • dingojack

    The Concerned Woman of American stated:

    “Even when the question of support for same-sex marriage was asked apart from the Supreme Court case, not even half, only 44 percent, support it. Thirty nine opposed it, and 15 percent stayed neutral.”

    Citations required. (He asks hopefully).

    Dingo

  • abb3w

    @14, dingojack

    Citations required. (He asks hopefully).

    Ed gave the link to the AP-GfK Poll’s summary page, which in turn has a link to the topline results; see pages 2 and 3 of the PDF.