Dumbass Confederate Wannabes Defend KKK Leaders

One of the things that was supposed to happen during the commemoration of the Selma march was a peaceful protest at a cemetery where Edmund Pettis, a KKK leaders, is buried and where a monument to Nathan Bedford Forrest, the founder of the KKK, can be found. But a bunch of neo-confederate assholes showed up to “defend” the monument against a peaceful protest, so it was canceled. And these people were everything you would imagine them to be.

There has been a growing campaign to rename Selma’s bridge given its association with the Confederate south, and dozens of students had planned a peaceful march to the cemetery. They quickly changed plans after discovering the neo-Confederates were waiting for them.

“‘March’ is a military term,” explained Todd Kiscaden, 64, who had traveled to Selma from his home in Tennessee to defend the memorial site. “In any military context, if you’re going to march on my castle, I’m going to man my barricades.”

Yes, you fucking idiot. And the next time you see a marching band, be sure to open fire on them over your inane semantic confusion.

Sunday’s aborted march to the cemetery was organised by Students Unite, the Selma-based youth group behind a viral online campaign to rename the Edmund Pettus bridge. They planned to march peacefully and respectfully to the graveyard, to draw protest against the Pettus bridge name and the existence of a monument to a white supremacist.

“We’re a non-violent group,” explained John Gainey, 25, executive director of Students Unite. “We didn’t want a confrontation.”

Pat Godwin, from the Selma chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy –which owns the confederate memorial site – conceded that the marchers had said they would be peaceful. “But on their website it said they were going to be protesting,” she added.

And therefore….what?

Kiscaden, who owns a coal mine in Kentucky, had an equally peculiar interpretation of history. He disputed that Forrest was a a founding member of the Klan, which he said played a positive role in bringing about law and order in the south when it was first conceived in the 1860s. (He distinguished the original Klan from the hate group of the same name that, he conceded, orchestrated lynchings.)

“The people in the south – the white people, who were being abused – organised a neighbourhood watch to try to re-establish some order,” he said of the nascent Klan. Slavery in the south was “a bad institution”, he said, but possibly “the mildest, most humane form of slavery ever practiced”.

“If you look at the wealth created by the slaves, in food, clothing, shelter, medical care, care before you’re old enough to work, care until you died, they got 90% of the wealth that they generated,” he said. “I don’t get that. The damn government takes my money to the tune of 50%.”

Kiscaden and Godwin insisted they were not racist. But they made plain that they hankered for a revival of some of the ideals most Americans believe were defeated in 1865.

“The Confederate government never surrendered,” Kiscaden said. “So are we still in operation? Maybe we’ll find out. I happen to think that our history from 150 years ago is about to catch us.”

No, we’re not racist, we just think slavery was a benign and “mild” institution and want to return the country to the 1850s. Nope, not racist at all.

POPULAR AT PATHEOS Nonreligious
What Are Your Thoughts?leave a comment
  • http://www.holytape.etsy.com holytape

    I thought that it was standard procedure to arrest terrorist sympathizers and make them disappear?

  • http://kamakanui.zenfolio.com Kamaka

    Kiscaden: “the mildest, most humane form of slavery ever practiced”

    Really? Come clean my house for free. Scrub the toilet first.

    Oh, wait, no. I would have to put up with your sorry ass. Bad idea.

  • Sastra

    No, we’re not racist, we just think slavery was a benign and “mild” institution and want to return the country to the 1850s. Nope, not racist at all.

    Look, he didn’t say the slaves had to be black — or even minorities. The new set of slaves could be white people on welfare who aren’t related to him in any way. Those people all have good reasons.

  • John Pieret

    There just aren’t enough desks to head.

  • http://en.uncyclopedia.co/wiki/User:Modusoperandi Modusoperandi

    If you look at the wealth created by the slaves, in food, clothing, shelter, medical care, care before you’re old enough to work, care until you died, they got 90% of the wealth that they generated,” he said. “I don’t get that. The damn government takes my money to the tune of 50%.

    From this I can only conclude that he’d be first in line to switch places.

  • theguy

    “If you look at the wealth created by the slaves”

    The vast majority of it was seized by their cracker owners, you degenerate piece of shit

    “in food, clothing, shelter”

    Substandard, you forgot to mention substandard

    “medical care”

    Substandard and I’m guessing barbaric

    “care before you’re old enough to work”

    Raised by other slaves, for no pay

    “care until you died”

    Also done by slaves, for no pay, unless I’m supposed to believe that the slavers personally changed bedpans.

    “they got 90% of the wealth that they generated”

    Then volunteer for it, dipshit

    “I don’t get that. The damn government takes my money to the tune of 50%.”

    So slavery is great but taxes are EEEEEVILL. Who’s paying 50% anyway, except the ridiculously wealthy?

  • Jeremy Shaffer

    Kiscaden, who owns a coal mine in Kentucky, had an equally peculiar interpretation of history. He disputed that Forrest was a a founding member of the Klan, which he said played a positive role in bringing about law and order in the south when it was first conceived in the 1860s. (He distinguished the original Klan from the hate group of the same name that, he conceded, orchestrated lynchings.)

    So it was all about ethics in post-war Reconstruction?

    “The people in the south – the white people, who were being abused – organised a neighbourhood watch to try to re-establish some order,” he said of the nascent Klan. Slavery in the south was “a bad institution”, he said, but possibly “the mildest, most humane form of slavery ever practiced”.

    It was the Dove Soap of slavery!

    Kiscaden and Godwin insisted they were not racist.

    Fine, have it your way. “Racist” is short and sweet in addition to being accurate but I guess ignorant, hateful, disingenuous asshole works just as well. Some people just gotta make everything difficult.

  • cptdoom

    “care before you’re old enough to work”

    As I understand it, there was no increase in rations for a slave family when a new baby entered the world – not until that kid was old enough to work, which was like 6, when they could truck water back and forth to the fields. Such an idyllic time…

  • Sastra

    Kiscaden, who owns a coal mine in Kentucky, had an equally peculiar interpretation of history. He disputed that Forrest was a a founding member of the Klan, which he said played a positive role in bringing about law and order in the south when it was first conceived in the 1860s. (He distinguished the original Klan from the hate group of the same name that, he conceded, orchestrated lynchings.) “The people in the south – the white people, who were being abused – organised a neighbourhood watch to try to re-establish some order,” he said of the nascent Klan. Slavery in the south was “a bad institution”, he said, but possibly “the mildest, most humane form of slavery ever practiced”.

    Hey, I saw that movie! Gone With the Wind.

    He’s right. The Klan was started by Ashley Wilkes when Scarlett foolishly went looking for trouble driving by Shanty Town and Mammy was beloved by all and ruled the O’Hara’s with just a frown and emphatic shake of her kerchief. MM hm.

  • slavdude

    The damn government takes my money to the tune of 50%.

    He must make an awful lot for the total value of the taxes from the marginal tax rates to equal 50% of his income. Like way more than Bill Gates.

    Marginal tax rates, how do they work?

  • seball

    Any idiot paying 50% of his income in taxes in this country needs to hire a better tax attorney!

  • matty1

    No, no he means there is a piece of music called “50%” and the tax collectors play it as a brass band when they call round. Then thing sing “Give us far less than half your income” to the tune of 50%.

  • Pierce R. Butler

    In any military context, Kiscaden must not have much of a castle if he needs barricades to defend it.

  • Pierce R. Butler

    “The Confederate government never surrendered,” Kiscaden said.

    Jefferson “Rambo” Davis and his cabinet just had to catch the last train out of Richmond after they were stabbed-in-the-back by that damned liberal Robert E. Lee!

  • caseloweraz

    Kiscaden, who owns a coal mine in Kentucky, had an equally peculiar interpretation of history…

    Unfortunately, his interpretation of mine safety regulations seems to be all too common.

    By the way: The Guardian has an article with a picture of the bearded bigot. Or you could go here and scroll down to picture #6.

  • pacal

    This dipshit obviously has only been reading stuff that excuses slavery and shines up that particular pestilent corpse. I also detect the pernicious influence of certain book from the mid 1970’s called Time on the Cross. The book spent its time breaking apart strawmen and advancing some very dubious conclusions based on a rather absurd way of looking at the evidence.

    It has been known for quite sometime that American slavery was different from that in the Caribbean and Brazil. There the physically destructive to workers, sugar cane growing and processing along with climate and the vicious brutality of the system produced a situation in which the death rate exceeded the birthrate in most places among the slaves. The result was the continued need to “import” new slaves to replace the ones that died.

    In the American South slaves worked at cotton, tobacco and rice generally and those crops and their processing was a lot less physically destructive to workers. The result was that the slave population of the American South was able to grow spectacularily, especially compared to the slave populations in other parts of the Americas.

    As for food and shelter under slavery – well the evidence we have to go anything it does appear that shelter was distinctly substandard and in fact comparable for most to a city slum. For food well the “standard” slave ration” for an adult field hand gave c. 5,000 calories a day. Since fat slaves seem to have been rare this would not indicate how nice the conditions for slaves were but how hard they were expected to work. Burning 5,000 calories a day is pretty heavy labour. There is also considerable evidence that the typical slave diet was commonly nutritionally deficient.

    As for medical care that is a dicey issue. The fact is medical care, has in modern medicine was not something that was available to most people at the time and further much of it was completely useless and of little benefit to people. For in fact modern scientific medicine had basically just recently started. It does appear that slave owners may in fact have had modern doctors look after their human “assets” more often than the typical “white” Southerner would have gone to a modern Doctor at the time. After all slaves were “human capital” and a dead slave was “worth” nothing to the slave owner. However it is doubtful if this greater access, relatively speaking, to then modern medicine benefited slaves much if at all.

    However what really captures the reality of living the life of a slave in the American South are two key indicators of quality of life. Life expectancy, and infant mortality. What we have been able to find would seems to indicate that compared to life expectancy of c. 45 years among “white” Southerners, the life expectancy of slaves was as little has 1/2 that and almost certainly under 30 and further infant mortality rates were up to 50% higher. Thus it appears that the physical conditions of slavery were typically those of a bad urban city slum at the time in America.

    I note that our hero does not mention the routine break-up of families and marriages by sale or upon the death of the slave owner. The fact that slave “marriages” were not recognized by the state in any capacity. That slave children were bastardized. (At the time a very significant social and legal stigma.) That it was unpleasantly common for the slave holder fathers of slave children to not just let their children remain slaves but to sell them. No doubt the “return” on their “investment” pleased them. Further this “human capital” was mortgaged, used as collateral on loans, speculated in etc., like these people were things not human beings. Finally the bottom line is that slavery in a species of totalitarian domination by some humans over other humans and has such repulsive in the extreme.

  • http://festeringscabofrealityblogspot.com fifthdentist

    Matty, # 12,

    Maybe he meant to the tune of 50 Cent. I could see an old Southern dude getting pissed off by those damn rap musics. Especially if he had to pay his taxes while listening to it.

  • llewelly

    ah yes, Nathan Bedford Forrest, who built a signifcant fraction of his fortune and reputation by invading northern states, capturing whatever black people he could find, many of whom had been freed legally or who had never been slaves, and selling them down south as “recaptured” slaves, after a certain period largely aided and abetted by the fugitive slave act of 1850 … a law reminding us that “states rights” folks are in fact quite eager to support federalism whenever it supports slavery.