Breaking News: Florida Republican Is an Idiot

We interrupt your regularly scheduled programming to bring you breaking news. A Republican state representative in Florida, Rep. John Wood, revealed himself to be a total moron when trying to argue against the reality of global warming. This is a repeat from every state legislature, every day.

Along with blasting the cost associated with the EPA plan, Wood said he does not think that carbon dioxide emissions, also known as CO2, was causing air pollution.

“If you consider CO2 to be a pollutant, than everybody zip up their mouths and don’t exhale for the rest of the meeting because you are polluting the air,” he said.

He said that. Out loud. In public.

“CO2 in my opinion is not a pollutant,” Wood said. “God gave us C02 to grow plants, for us to exhale, everything else.”

That too.

Wood said he thought Florida’s compliance with the federal plan to curb carbon dioxide emissions would place “draconian costs” on the state and not produce much of an impact on the climate or rising sea levels.

“The impact on the level of the sea…is equivalent to the difference in this piece of paper,” he said, holding up a single sheet of paper. “For me, that is not good science. That is not a good reason to implement this provision on the people of Florida.”

Yeah, it’s either the thickness of a piece of paper or several feet that will bury Florida’s coastal cities. It’s one of those two. But this guy has an opinion, which is obviously just as good as actual scientific research.

Please stop electing stupid people.

"Yep. Principally raking in a nice fat paycheck for hauling the party line."

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  • robertfaber

    The reason we exhale CO2 when we breathe is because its a deadly toxin to humans.

  • http://www.facebook.com/den.wilson d.c.wilson

    Water is essential for life. Therefore, according to Rep. Wood’s logic, it’s impossible for water to ever be harmful t life. To that end, I encourage Rep. Wood to stick his head in a big bucket of water and never take it out.

  • John Pieret

    Please stop electing stupid people.

    Unfortunately, that would take keeping stupid people from voting, which kinda goes contrary to the idea of a democracy.

  • Pierce R. Butler

    Florida Republicans not so hot at real estate deals, either:

    Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL) and former Rep. David Rivera (R-FL) have put the troubled Florida house they co-own on the market for less than they originally paid for it, according to a Politico report.

  • http://kamakanui.zenfolio.com Kamaka

    “draconian costs”?

    Just ask the president of Vanuatu, he can tell you about costs.

  • http://drx.typepad.com Dr X

    Well then just exhale into a plastic bag and breath nothing but that. Or try nitrogen. Breath nothing but nitrogen because it helps plants grow.

  • raven

    Some days I just have to shrug.

    1. Florida and Miami in particular are one of the most at risk places for global warming and sea level rise. So is most of the southeast Atlantic and gulf coasts, the fundie/GOP heartland.

    Miami is already having problems with sea level rise causing flooding and is spending lots of money dealing with it.

    2. If they don’t care about it, why should I? I don’t live there.

    3. Sea level rise is and will happen no matter what Florida’s elected leadership says. Reality doesn’t care what they believe.

  • http://www.gregory-gadow.net Gregory in Seattle

    An idiot Republican? In Florida? Well, clutch my pearls!

  • raven

    AFAICT, the plan to deal with sea level rise from Virginia south through Louisiana, is to just keep building on the coast until something happens. Parts of these areas i.e. Norfolk, Virginia, Miami, and Louisiana are already having big problems from sea level rise.

    1. Many of these people know full well that global warming and sea level rises are happening.

    2. Their argument is so what? It will take decades for something drastic to happen. So they get the use of their property until a hurricane and a storm surge destroy it. That could happen in 2050.

    By then, they will be dead. And the developers will long ago have gotten paid and moved on.

    3. Not sure how much economic sense this strategy makes. But I wouldn’t put any more money in coastal property than I can afford to lose in one (stormy) day.

    I don’t know if insurance companies are writing policies for these areas, but sooner or later they aren’t going to any more.

  • scienceavenger

    Unfortunately, [stopping electing stupid people] would take keeping stupid people from voting, which kinda goes contrary to the idea of a democracy.

    IMO, it’s tribalism, combined with a good dose of gerrymandering, not stupidity, that is causing this. I know plenty of intelligent Republicans who would eagerly vote for an idiot R over a genius D.

  • footface

    God gave us carbon dioxide… to exhale? God makes it and sticks it in our blood so we can exhale it?

    Thanks, I guess.

  • John Pieret

    scienceavenger:

    it’s tribalism, combined with a good dose of gerrymandering, not stupidity, that is causing this. I know plenty of intelligent Republicans who would eagerly vote for an idiot R

    I understand what you’re getting at but I’m not sure there can be tribalism that drives you to vote against your own best interests that doesn’t also fall under the rubric of “stupidity.”

  • brucegee1962

    In some ways, this is very good news. If Florida was a deep blue, doing everything in its power to fight climate change, then I personally would feel terrible about their inevitable submergence. But as it is, I know that in the future as I watch it go under, I’ll feel a grim sense of satisfaction.

    Wait — the problem with that plan is that in 2050, Fox News will be telling its viewers that the Republican Party has always been the one that opposed global warming, just like they were always the party in favor of civil rights. And their viewers will believe them. Drat, so much for my plan.

  • http://www.facebook.com/bev.stapleton.3 bevstapleton

    I swear, I didn’t vote for him.

  • http://en.uncyclopedia.co/wiki/User:Modusoperandi Modusoperandi

    They are not voting against their own self interest. Republicans are merpeople. Why else would they constantly be pushing statehood for Atlantis?

  • colnago80

    I’m sure that the blogs former resident climate change denier, Sir Lancelot, thinks he’s the cat’s meow.

  • eric

    Raven @9:

    3. Not sure how much economic sense this strategy makes

    It makes great economic sense if you are a developer: profit now while shifting all the costs/risks onto the future public. It also makes perfect sense if you are a politician relying on campaign contributions from developers.

    After all, as you point out, both of these types will have gotten their profit and moved on when the economic costs of the strategy have to be paid.

  • Michael Heath

    Ed Brayton states:

    Please stop electing stupid people.

    John Pieret writes:

    Unfortunately, that would take keeping stupid people from voting, which kinda goes contrary to the idea of a democracy.

    Last evening I was watching a Daniel Dennett TED talk from several years ago. He was arguing that we should frequently teach the facts about religion as an ongoing stand-alone required course just like we do math or history. His point was that democracy doesn’t work well if we lack informed citizens. I think Dr. Dennett has a point.

    This was the speech where Dennett critiqued Rick Warren’s book, Purpose Driven Life. One of the quotes Dennett referenced from Warren’s book was the assertion that earth didn’t have any rain until Noah’s flood. Where the hell did that come from? And Mr. Warren is a hero to evangelicals.

  • jufulu

    Raven @9 and eric says @17

    When I first started reading the post and comments, I was going to make some sarky comments about not letting the Feds provide money to states that refuse money that help mitigate GW effects to states the don’t recognize it. Obviously that would never happen. And then I came to your comments and flashed back to when I used provide info on FEMA flood insurance maps (something I recommend when ever you consider purchasing property). People are going to pay more money for this and other insurance and get surprised when that bill comes in. You can’t argue with properly done actuarial tables.

  • John Pieret

    Michael Heath @ 18:

    democracy doesn’t work well if we lack informed citizens

    I agree. Unfortunately, there is a built-in Catch 22 at work here. The very people who would have to implement a course on religion or science are voted onto local school boards by uniformed citizens who want no part of having their children educated beyond their own understanding of the world.

    earth didn’t have any rain until Noah’s flood

    It is one reading of Genesis 2:5–6, which states that “the LORD God had not caused it to rain upon the earth, and there was not a man to till the ground. But there went up a mist from the earth, and watered the whole face of the ground.” Coupled with the idea of a “water canopy” that supplied much of the flood water, and the idea that God first put a rainbow in the sky after the flood, some YECs argue there was no rain before the flood. Answers in Genesis, by the way, disagrees with that interpretation.

    https://answersingenesis.org/bible-questions/did-it-rain-before-the-flood/

  • D. C. Sessions

    Not sure how much economic sense this strategy makes. But I wouldn’t put any more money in coastal property than I can afford to lose in one (stormy) day.

    I don’t know if insurance companies are writing policies for these areas, but sooner or later they aren’t going to any more.

    That’s what Federal disaster relief is for. There’s really no need to waste money on private insurance when the Feds will pay after every hurricane.

  • Erp

    The insurance companies are well aware of what is coming such as a Lloyd’s report, “Against a background of more frequent severe weather events, such as floods and windstorms, a new report from Lloyd’s highlights the importance of insurers ensuring that their catastrophe modelling tools keep pace with the effects of climate change”. No debate here on climate change just what the insurers should do about it. Insurance companies (at least those wanting to be around for the long term) have a great stake in accurate modeling since it will mean the difference between profit or loss. Lloyd’s has its own concerns since it is based in a part of London that can be flooded (though there is the Thames barrier).

    btw in contrast to Florida, New York’s government on climate change. I wonder how much having vulnerable Manhattan with all the insurance companies based there affects how the NY government reacts.

  • llewelly

    raven:

    2. If they don’t care about it, why should I? I don’t live there.

    Most trade is global these days. That means ocean ports are a necessity. Those ports will all have to be moved eventually, and if we can’t make policymakers face the fact that oceans are rising, those ports won’t be moved in time, and we’ll all be in deep garbage.

    Furthermore there is tons of other essential infrastructure, such as roads and factories and chemical refineries and lots of agriculture that are at very low elevations, but are nonetheless critical to society.

    Even more, there are lots of people who live in Florida who really do care about the problem, and are engaging in activism to try to convince policy makers to do something about the problems.

    Why should you ignore the plight of those people, just because short-sighted profiteers happen to be in positions of power?

    Finally as oceans do rise, people will move inland. Don’t want to do something about this oncoming refugee problem?

  • suttkus

    By his logic, excrement is great! God gave it to us (well, it’s as true for excrement as it is for CO2). We produce it. It makes plants grow. How awesome is that! We should spread it around everywhere and not ever be concerned about how much of it is sitting on our front lawns!

  • Al Dente

    Raven @7

    Reality doesn’t care what they believe.

    “Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn’t go away.” -Philip K. Dick

  • llewelly

    Michael Heath:

    I was watching a Daniel Dennett TED talk from several years ago. He was arguing that we should frequently teach the facts about religion as an ongoing stand-alone required course just like we do math or history.

    Truth is, as wonderful as it might be to get Dennett’s analogy between religion and a brain worm taught in schools, I am afraid that if we try to get that done, we’ll have both parties jump on our heads and wipe out our whole movement.

    And that’s not the only problem. Religions contain tons of conflicts in the doctrines, they make many false claims, they teach horrifically bad morals, and some of them were clearly founded by con artists.

    These truths are very important, and slowly more people are becoming open to them, but they are still so unpopular that it’s likely to be a great many years before it’s safe to suggest introducing them into schools.

    Now of course it’s worth saying that Dennett is actually in favor of introducing the gentle and less threatening truths first; he doesn’t want to leap directly to the “brain worm” analogy.

    But the point is that we have a long, long road ahead of us.

  • grumpyoldfart

    Please stop electing stupid people.

    Update your education system.

    – Teach the basic steps of the scientific method.

    – Highlight the most commonly used logical fallacies.

    – Provide an introduction to probability and statistics.

    Don’t just teach these subjects – make sure the students actually understand them.

  • scienceavenger

    @ 12 I understand what you’re getting at but I’m not sure there can be tribalism that drives you to vote against your own best interests that doesn’t also fall under the rubric of “stupidity.”

    Well, expansive definitions of “stupidity” notwithstanding, think of Heaven’s Gate, many clearly very intelligent people driven to do ridiculous things all due to their tribalism. Our modern political system is producing a similar tribe, except it is segregated from the rest of us by media selections, the epistemelogical bubble. When you only trust news sources like Drudge, the Wall Street Journal, and Fox news (because everyone else is a biased lying leftie), then it appears to be in your interests to vote Republican, no matter who they are. ,

  • lorn

    As part of my job I go into a lot of houses in Florida. Lots of older folks, but with thirty years to go, live with FOX news on the TV pretty much 24/7 and they are very sure it is the “liberal media”, non-FOX sources, that are lying to them.

  • http://kamakanui.zenfolio.com Kamaka

    grumpyoldfart @ 27

    Well, aren’t you the starry-eyed idealist today?

  • http://kamakanui.zenfolio.com Kamaka

    @ lorn

    NPR is my background noise. No doubt it has influence on my thinking.

  • lorn

    Kamaka @ 31.

    For me it is Morning Edition at 0600 , All things Considered at 1600 (main show at 1700), The News Hour on TV at 1900 and, lacking anything else on, most nights, the same show art 2200. I’m pretty sure I’m being brain washed, but in a good way. Studies show that while while FOX viewers are quite unaware and poorly informed NPR and PBS listeners are, on average, well informed.

    ie: When the news about Vanuatu broke I actually knew that Vanuatu was in the SW Pacific. The two neighbors who I know are regular FOX viewers had no idea. One thought the place was entirely made up. Irony is one keeps telling me ‘When you want to try the red pill come talk to me’. LOL.

  • http://kamakanui.zenfolio.com Kamaka

    “One thought the place was entirely made up.”

    Vanuatu denial? How convenient. Let’s pretend the first Pacific Islander evacuation and relocation due to global warming is just, I dunno, a lefty lie. That’s it! They’re making it up!