Arpaio Admits to Ignoring Court Orders

Ladies and gentlemen, we have an historic first. Fascist Maricopa County, Arizona Sheriff Joe Arpaio has actually admitted to doing something wrong. Well, I’m sure he doesn’t think it was wrong. But he admitted in a court filing that he has ignored previous court orders and promised to stop doing so.

Controversial Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio and his chief deputy Gerald Sheridan accepted civil sanctions for contempt of court on Tuesday…

Arpaio needed to comply with changes to his agency set by Judge Snow after losing a 2007 class action racial profiling lawsuit. Evidence shows that Arpaio failed to comply with the orders in recent months, leading Snow to call next month’s four-day hearing starting April 21.

Arpaio and Deputy Sheridan admitted to violating Snow’s orders three times, including ignoring a 2011 court order telling Maricopa police to stop detaining immigrants solely on racial profiling.

“There is nothing Defendants can do to change what has already been done,” a joint motion by Arpaio and Sheridan states. “But through the entry of an order finding them in civil contempt and by implementing remedies discussed herein, Defendants can express sincere remorse to the Court and to Plaintiffs, begin to make amends to those who have been injured and take affirmative steps to ensure nothing like this occurs in the future.”

I don’t suggest holding one’s breath in anticipation of him actually doing so, of course.

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What Are Your Thoughts?leave a comment
  • Sastra

    … Defendants can express sincere remorse to the Court and to Plaintiffs

    “I’m sorry you didn’t like what I felt morally obligated and justified in doing….”

  • John Pieret

    The judge is still holding out the possibility of referring the matter to the US Attorney for a criminal contempt prosecution. This sounds like they are agreeing to a civil contempt citation as a way to avoid any criminal charges.

  • http://en.uncyclopedia.co/wiki/User:Modusoperandi Modusoperandi

    Arpaio and Deputy Sheridan admitted to violating Snow’s orders three times, including ignoring a 2011 court order telling Maricopa police to stop detaining immigrants solely on racial profiling.

    It wasn’t “solely on racial profiling”. They also looked suspicious.*

     

    * Suspiciously Mexican.

  • rabbitscribe

    Judge “Lightning” Snow is willing to put up with Arpaio’s defiance for eight years, and not a second longer…

  • http://mostlyrational.net tacitus

    The judge is still holding out the possibility of referring the matter to the US Attorney for a criminal contempt prosecution.

    And if they don’t, will Kent Hovind’s crew complain about Sheriff Joe getting special treatment while he gets charged and convicted for what is a far less serious case of contempt?

    I doubt it, somehow.

  • abb3w

    @19, John Pieret

    The judge is still holding out the possibility of referring the matter to the US Attorney for a criminal contempt prosecution. This sounds like they are agreeing to a civil contempt citation as a way to avoid any criminal charges.

    I’m academically curious how this filing — and its stipulation of most of the facts necessary to support a criminal contempt charge — would impact such prosecution; IE, would it be admissible toward such proceedings, if the judge is feeling pissy enough to refer such over to the US Attorney’s office anyway?

  • moarscienceplz

    I don’t approve of the death penalty, but in this case (because he has committed murder in this exact same way) throw that shitstain in an unshaded cage in the Phoenix summer sun until he dies of exposure!

  • John Pieret

    I’m academically curious how this filing — and its stipulation of most of the facts necessary to support a criminal contempt charge — would impact such prosecution; IE, would it be admissible toward such proceedings, if the judge is feeling pissy enough to refer such over to the US Attorney’s office anyway?

    It depends (typical lawyer’s answer!). First of all, Arpaio’s lawyers may have an understanding with the judge that if they do this and spare the court 4 days of trial, he won’t refer it to the US Attorney. If so, and the judge changes his mind, he would probably allow them to withdraw the stipulation. If they weren’t allowed to withdraw it, they could defend it as an attempt to settle the matter without undue legal costs and I would not be surprised if the stipulation (without having read it) contains a disclaimer that their violations of the orders were inadvertent and merely negligent, not criminal.

    If his lawyers are worth spit, the reason they are willing to admit the orders were violated is because it is easy to demonstrate and their defense to a criminal contempt charge would always have been based on whether or not they had criminal intent.