Duke Professor Pens Racist Rant in NY Times

An 80-year old Duke University professor is in hot water over a long online comment he left on the New York Times website in response to an article about racism and the Baltimore protests. For instance, he said that black people have weird names and that means they don’t assimilate in society. Here’s what he wrote:

This editorial is what is wrong. The Democrats are an alliance of Westchester and Harlem, of Montgomery County and intercity Baltimore. Westchester and Montgomery get a Citigroup asset stimulus policy that triples the market. The blacks get a decline in wages after inflation.

But the blacks get symbolic recognition in an utterly incompetent mayor who handled this so badly from beginning to end that her resignation would be demanded if she were white. The blacks get awful editorials like this that tell them to feel sorry for themselves.

In 1965 the Asians were discriminated against as least as badly as blacks. That was reflected in the word “colored.” The racism against what even Eleanor Roosevelt called the yellow races was at least as bad.

So where are the editorials that say racism doomed the Asian-Americans. They didn’t feel sorry for themselves, but worked doubly hard.

I am a professor at Duke University. Every Asian student has a very simple old American first name that symbolizes their desire for integration. Virtually every black has a strange new name that symbolizes their lack of desire for integration. The amount of Asian-white dating is enormous and so surely will be the intermarriage. Black-white dating is almost non-existent because of the ostracism by blacks of anyone who dates a white.

It was appropriate that a Chinese design won the competition for the Martin Luther King statue. King helped them overcome. The blacks followed Malcolm X.

But he’s totally not being racist, you guys, because he voted for Obama:

In an email, Hough said he was a disciple of Martin Luther King Jr. in the 1950s and voted for President Barack Obama. He pointed out that the first book he assigned to students in 1961 was “Black Like Me.” He further stated that one of the best students he ever taught was African American, and he had encouraged her to apply for a Rhodes Scholarship, but she pursued a career in athletics.

I bet he even let her use his bathroom.

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  • DaveL

    Virtually every black has a strange new name that symbolizes their lack of desire for integration

    Because when whites choose names consonant with their culture, that’s just normal, but when blacks do, it means they’re unwilling to integrate into society. And by ‘society’, we mean “a group made up of white people.”

  • http://www.pandasthumb.org Area Man

    Yeah, I’m sick of those weird black names like “Willard Mitt”, “Trig”, “Tagg”, “Bristol”, “Reince”, or “Piper”. I’m not sure how much more proof you need of their unwillingness to assimilate and be Real Americans.

  • colnago80

    Look the guy’s 80 years old. It would not be surprising if he were getting a little dingy in his declining years.

  • skylanetc

    In 1965 the Asians were discriminated against as least as badly as blacks.

    What absolute twaddle. I went to public schools with Asian kids in the Jim Crow Houston, TX of the ’50s and ’60s, but never with a single African American kid.

    .

    Hough is an ignorant fool.

  • smrnda

    I recall a number of Asian students who *used* an Anglophone first name, but this was frequently just a means of avoiding having to explain how to pronounce their names to everyone.

    His analysis of the perceived lack of Black/white dating is a bit overly simplistic as well, and kind of ignores the fact that it might be white ostracism, or something like residential segregation at work. Many young white people are cautioned against dating Black people for any number of reasons by their families; even some parents possibly feel they mean well telling their kids that if they have kids who are at all Black, their chance of being shot by cops for no good reason increases dramatically. A rather depressing thing to say, wonder what this prof has to say about that?

  • jonathangray

    He’s got a point

  • zenlike

    I see our resident bigot has found an incident of a black person doing something wrong. This of course proofs that racisms is totally valid, you guys!

    jonathangray, do fuck of, you bigoted piece of shit.

  • jonathangray

    I see our resident bigot has found an incident of a black person doing something wrong. This of course proofs that racisms is totally valid, you guys!

    No, no — I just thought “Shitavious” was funny.

  • sugarfrosted

    @4

    What absolute twaddle. I went to public schools with Asian kids in the Jim Crow Houston, TX of the ’50s and ’60s, but never with a single African American kid.

    Not entirely twaddle. For example the miscegenation laws in California weren’t there to prevent whites and blacks from marrying, but for whites and Asians. See also the Chinese exclusion act, yellow peril, Japanese internment.

    Just because they weren’t as oppressed in Texas as black people means nothing.

  • David Eriksen

    If Hough thinks that racism towards Asians is over he need only talk to a few of his colleagues.

    My first (short lived) job after finishing my BS was as a tech in a lab in Duke’s Biochemistry Department. The PI I worked for absolutely hated the lab down the hall that was run by Chinese researchers. At least once a week I’d hear about how they all smelled bad and didn’t know how to drive. Anything bad that happened in the department was clearly their fault. Her husband (also a Duke professor) was just as bad if not worse.

  • smrnda

    @sugarfrosted

    If I recall correctly, the first drug made illegal in the US was opium, because it was the drug used by the Chinese, and anti-Chinese racism was quite a thing at the time.

    And if we think of the size of the continent of Asia and the people included, quite a lot of Asian people are racially profiled today as suspect terrorists.

  • http://aceofsevens.wordpress.com Ace of Sevens

    @sugarfrosted, yes, but that was way before 1965. Anti-Asian racism of that sort died out quickly after world War 2 (and only applied to the Japanese during World War 2).

  • sugarfrosted

    @12 To be fair the oppression olympics are a dumb competition and past oppression doesn’t reflect modern oppression.

  • http://drx.typepad.com Dr X

    No, no — I just thought “Shitavious” was funny.

    Like Shulem Lipschitz or Kosuke Fukudome?

    I’m sure Jonathan Gray would also get a kick out of the real names of my parents and many of my relatives.

    Just a question for other readers: Has it been established that Mr. Gray isn’t a 13-year-old child?

  • skylanetc

    @sugarfrosted

    Hough claimed that “In 1965 the Asians were discriminated against at least as badly as blacks. “

    .

    That is nonsense. Schools were not segregated by law against Asians in many American states, nor were Asians prohibited from “white” parts of movie theaters, as they were in my home town, nor restricted to restrooms and drinking fountains labled for their use.

    .

    I would never argue that Asians were not subject to racism in America in 1965, but saying it was “at least” the equivalent of racial oppression suffered by African Americans in those days is demonstrably wrong.

  • KRS

    Hough sounds like a nice English last name. Given that Hough’s English ancestors didn’t assimilate into the Native American cultures of the New World when they came over, and in fact physically decimated their tribes and virtually destroyed their cultures, I don’t think he really has any business lecturing other people about assimilation.

  • Vicki, duly vaccinated tool of the feminist conspiracy

    “Mike” is a nice, short, English given name. It didn’t save Mike Brown from a Ferguson police bullet.

  • StevoR

    @ 8. jonathangray : “No, no — I just thought “Shitavious” was funny.”

    As funny as Mike Crapo? : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mike_Crapo

    Oh, hey look, he did something wrong and criminal once too!

  • =8)-DX

    @Dr. X #14

    Like Shulem Lipschitz or Kosuke Fukudome?

    Well, to be honest I’d say all cultures and languages have names that sound funny/rude in other languages. Plus of course the names that sound like a joke in one’s own language (Mrs. Dead and Mr. Ballsack are real names in mine). Funny names are funny, I don’t get why people also have to follow them up with horrible racism.

  • StevoR

    @17. Vicki, duly vaccinated tool of the feminist conspiracy : Yep. Walter Scott are another two first names – in this case a “Christian”name and surname that are very english and assimilated and yet failed to save an unarmed fleeing man from being shot in the back eight times and then framed by his killer. See :

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-04-08/white-south-carolina-policeman-charged-with-murdering-black-man/6377482

    Trigger warning : Real life death and murder. Confronting footage included there.

  • Anri

    This professor took way too many words to say “If only they were smart enough to act whiter, I’d like them better!”

  • http://www.ranum.com Marcus Ranum

    Anyone with a name like Jerry Hough probably shouldn’t be pointing and giggling at anyone else’s name.

  • eric

    In 1965 the Asians were discriminated against as least as badly as blacks. That was reflected in the word “colored.”

    Um, no. The term was in use as far back as the mid-1800s. I can remember my grandparents using it (and only to refer to African Americans), and they grew up in the ’30s and ’40s.

    smrnda @11:

    If I recall correctly, the first drug made illegal in the US was opium, because it was the drug used by the Chinese, and anti-Chinese racism was quite a thing at the time.

    Ironically because the Brits in the 1800s forced the Chinese at gunpoint to legalize it. The British East India Company had this huge opium production going in India and needed buyers, so the crown literally fought two wars with China to force them to accept (greater, legal) opium import.

  • Holms

    When I have a son, I will give him a good and white (but I repeat myself) name… like Newt.

  • StevoR

    @ ^ Holms : What if you have a daughter?

  • eric

    @24: might I suggest a strong anglo-saxon/Germanic name, such as Englebert?

  • Donnie

    StevoR says

    May 19, 2015 at 8:51 am

    @ ^ Holms : What if you have a daughter?

    Thank you.

  • greg1466

    I was thinking basically the same thing as smrnda (#5). I’ve known quite a few people of Asian and Indian heritage who used Anglican names, mostly because it’s easier than teaching ignorant Americans how to pronounce their actual names.

  • bryanfeir

    Heck, doesn’t even need to be Asian or Indian heritage. I know a fellow who works in the U.S. these days, but enjoys coming back to Canada just because people in Canada would usually know how to pronounce his name correctly.

    His name? Jean-Paul. As pronounced in French, sort of dzha(n)-pol. (The existence of the ‘n’ depends on whether or not you can get the French nasal vowels correct, and most English-speaking people need a good bit of practice, because it is not a native sound in English.)