The Orwellian World of Joseph Farah

Worldnetdaily owner Joseph Farah lives in some sort of alternate bizzaro world, an Orwellian place where up is down, black is white and forcing school children to recite government-composed prayers is an important part of “America’s Christian heritage of liberty.”

America began a marked departure from the ways of God during the 1960s.

Perhaps the most remarkable government decision came in two Supreme Court rulings that took prayer out of public schools. They weren’t decisions based on popular outcries. They were very much rulings based on the opinions of elite jurists out of touch with both America’s Christian heritage of liberty and its role in self-government and the popular will of the country.

Let’s review. The two cases he’s talking about were Engle v Vitale and Abington Township v Schempp. One involved the government requiring school children to recite the Lord’s Prayer every morning. The other involved forcing school children to recite a prayer that was composed by the government. Exactly how can any rational person argue that forcing school children to recite prayers is about protecting liberty? The answer is obvious: We are not dealing here with a rational person, we are dealing with a theocrat. When he refers to the “Christian heritage of liberty” he means our heritage of allowing Christians to destroy the liberty of others. Mr. Orwell, it turns out, was a bit of an optimist.

Instead of turning back, America is turning away from God – at hyper-speed.

The consequences are ominous.

Too many Americans have become convinced that we can, as a nation, have it both ways – denying God and still somehow hanging on to our liberty, prosperity and security. It just doesn’t work that way.

A quote from James Madison is very relevant here: “We have staked the whole future of the American civilization, not upon the power of government, far from it. We have staked the future … upon the capacity of each and all of us to govern ourselves, to control ourselves, to sustain ourselves according to the Ten Commandments of God.”

He chose his words carefully, and they were accurate and to the point.

Oh yes, Madison did choose his words carefully. But not these words because he never said them, or anything remotely like them. This is yet another one of those quotes made popular by David Barton that is completely fake. Not that Farah cares, of course. Acknowledging and correcting that would require an honesty that I don’t believe he possesses. But to test it, I left a comment pointing out that it is fake and saying that will eagerly await his correction. Since I left that comment, six new comments have been released from moderation; mine has disappeared. What a surprise.

Update: I left a second comment on Monday morning and it was allowed out of moderation, but to this point there has been no change to the article. The fake quote is still there and there is no hint of even an acknowledgment of it, much less a correction. And since they moderate the comments, you know that at least someone at WND knows about it. Speaks volumes about their total lack of integrity and honesty. And it’s not the first time. I caught Ellis Washington doing that a couple times in his WND columns a couple years ago and notified him by email. He responded to my email, but did not care that his quotes were fake and did not issue a correction.

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  • http://twitter.com/#!/TabbyLavalamp Tabby Lavalamp

    You see, Madison may not have said it but it’s something he could have said if he agreed entirely with Farah and Barton!

  • dingojack

    Ed – you mean that WND are Liars for Jesus?!?

    Say it ain’t so Ed, say it ain’t so!!

    @@

    Dingo

  • Synfandel

    Farah says:

    A quote from James Madison is very relevant here: “We have staked the whole future of the American civilization, not upon the power of government, far from it. We have staked the future … upon the capacity of each and all of us to govern ourselves, to control ourselves, to sustain ourselves according to the Ten Commandments of God.”

    Snopes says:

    Actually, this statement appears nowhere in the writings or recorded utterances of James Madison and is completely contradictory to his character as a strong proponent of the separation of church and state.

  • http://en.uncyclopedia.co/wiki/User:Modusoperandi Modusoperandi

    The Orwellian World of Joseph Farah

    Dibs on kid’s show title!

  • Synfandel

    For the theme music, might I suggest a selection from The Cheerful Insanity of Giles, Giles and Fripp?

  • thebookofdave

    The ignorance is strong in this one.

  • flyv65

    I read through some of the comments looking for Ed’s and became nauseous. Here’s a ProTip: never read the comments at the WingNutDaily…

  • grumpyoldfart

    If Christians can believe the nonsense in the bible they will have no trouble believing the lies told by Barton. They’d be pissed off if he stopped telling lies.

  • http://timgueguen.blogspot.com timgueguen

    Synfandel, King Crimson’s “The Great Deceiver” would be a better choice for Farrah and WND.

  • carpenterman

    Farah and his followers live in their own version of history, where America and the Church (or more specifically, *their* church) were always one and the same, and the Past was a shining, golden age, until us liberal hippies/ atheists/ communists/ blacks/ homosexuals/ uppity women wiped our filthy hands all over it. The America that they claim is being ruined never existed. It’s a myth, no more actual history than a Washington Irving poem.

  • Dave Maier

    Now [9:30 Eastern] it says “A quote that has been attributed to James Madison but not confirmed as such is relevant nevertheless”.

  • peterh

    @#9:

    Now you’ve done it! I’ve gotta go listen to “In the Court of the Crimson King!”

    @#11:

    Something Madison most likely never said is still relevant to Farah’s fantasies? Shows what uncontrolled breeding can lead to.

  • marcus

    timgueguen @ 9 I nominate the Dead’s Estimated Profit

    My time coming, any day, don’t worry about me, no

    It’s gonna be just like they say, them voices tell me so

    Seems so long I felt this way and time sure passin’ slow

    Still I know I lead the way, they tell me where I go.

  • John Pieret

    I think I see what happened … you folks think Farah was quoting James Madison, Jr., fourth president of the US, generally known as ‘the Father of the Constitution.’ He was actually quoting James (“Bubba”) Madison, a used car dealer in Macon, Georgia who said it in 1938 in response to proposed consumer regulations that would take the place, in consumer’s minds, of the trust he engendered by his frequent professions of his belief in the 10 Commandments.

    Bubba particularly hoped such legislation would not be necessary after he completed his 3 year sentence.

  • Synfandel

    Now you’ve done it! I’ve gotta go listen to “In the Court of the Crimson King!”

    I can think of worse things to do.

  • Dave Maier

    “The Great Deceiver” isn’t on “In the Court of the Crimson King”, it’s on “Starless and Bible Black”.