How To Deal With Unwanted Hotel Bibles? Don’t Read Them

Someone named Steve Lowe has a guest post at Hemant’s blog, which also appears in the most recent issue of American Atheists magazine, entitled “How to Deal with Unwanted Hotel Bibles.” The answer seems obvious to me: Don’t read them. Or do, if you like. Apparently that isn’t good enough for Lowe, who goes through an elaborate ritual instead:

Are you tired of always finding a Bible in your hotel room bedside drawer?

No, actually. I’ve spent hundreds and hundreds of nights of my life in hotel rooms (9 years of traveling to debate tournaments every weekend, almost 5 years of being a road comic and countless weekends at conferences add up quickly), and I can probably count on one hand the number of times I’ve even opened the bedside drawer for any reason, much less to see if there’s a Bible there.

When I come across a Bible — or any religious book — in a hotel room, I personally take it to the front desk. I smile, shake the hand of the person behind the counter, and compliment them on something (the nice room, the helpful staff, etc.). If it’s the case, I mention that I’m a member of their loyalty program. I then ask to speak to the manager on duty. I do all of this in a friendly way, which establishes a cordial setting for what I do next, which is to ask, “Is this a hotel only for Christians?” or “Do you have a preference for Christians at this hotel?” or “Do you presume that I am a Christian?” The typical reply is, “No, why do you ask?”

“Well,” I say, placing the Bible on the counter, “I found this in my room.” The usual reply is, “Yes, we put those in all of our rooms as a matter of company policy.”

My response, always delivered politely, is to ask, “Why is there only a Christian religious book in the room? Does this hotel presume that all guests are Christian? Why not a Koran, and a Torah, and the Book of Mormon, and a book on Buddhism?”

At this point, they often apologize on behalf of the hotel and offer to take it off my hands. I give it to them and thank them, but I continue with the following points:

“The policy of placing only a Christian book in the rooms gives the impression that this hotel assumes that all guests are Christian, or worse, that it prefers Christian guests, or, even worse, that it thinks all guests should become Christians…

In closing, I state exactly what actions I want them to take: “Thank you for listening to my feedback (keep smiling). I would like you to convey to your upper management my complaint and ask that they consider changing their policy and put no religious materials in the rooms. A Bible is not necessary, it’s off-putting to many guests, and even offensive to some. If this hotel wants to respond to the “needs” of some guests, I suggest having copies of several religious texts at the front desk, available upon request.” I leave on a cordial note by shaking their hand and thanking them for their time.

If, after my stay, I receive a standard email requesting feedback about my stay, I make these points again in writing. If I’m not asked for feedback, I go to their website and send the feedback myself, making sure to include any reference or confirmation number along with the dates and location of my stay. If there is no electronic option to do this, I mail a letter to the company headquarters.

Congratulations. You’ve managed to annoy the crap out of a front desk clerk who couldn’t possibly care any less, who will be sure to raise your complaint with the board of directors at the next shareholder’s conference. I do the same thing with my coffee maker. You see, I don’t drink coffee and it angers me that the hotel so presumptuously thinks that everyone who stays there drinks coffee — or worse yet, that they think only coffee drinkers should stay at their hotels. I’m very polite about it, of course, and that magically makes up for the fact that I’m wasting both my time and theirs.

Yes, yes, I know. Religion is bad and we must strike a blow for rationality, no matter how small it may be, because…..*snore*. Seriously, people. It’s a fucking book, sitting in a drawer where chances are very slim that you’ll ever even notice it if you don’t go looking for it. It doesn’t give off cooties. And taking this Brave Stand for Reason will do nothing at all to make religion any less bad or reduce its influence. And you’re not being an edgy activist by behaving this way, you’re just being childish.

What is it we like to tell Christian conservatives who object to gay characters on TV and other things they disapprove of? Don’t watch the shows. Watch what you like. The same principle works here. It really isn’t worth any more effort than that.

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  • Trebuchet

    My great-grandfather was a founding member of The Gideons. According to his obituary, it was he who introduced the motion at one of their early meetings that they take on distributing Bibles to hotel rooms as their mission. That probably isn’t true, but I always look for Great-Granddaddy’s bible anyhow.

    In Utah, of course, you also get a Book of Mormon, or, as I like to call it, a BM.

  • LightningRose

    If I’m really bored, I’ll highlight my favorite passages and mark them with small post-its. FTB doesn’t like posts with multiple links so I’ll just include my personal favorite:

    https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Deuteronomy+23%3A12-14&version=KJV

  • Synfandel

    And as Mr. Lowe walks back to his room, the duty manager mutters, “Asshole”.

  • Synfandel

    @2 LightningRose,

    Précis: “Bury your shit.”

  • daved

    I’ve seen the Book of Mormon in other western states besides Utah. I’ll know things are really getting interesting when I get a hotel room that has a copy of the Tao Te Ching, or maybe a Bhagavad Gita.

  • eric

    (9 years of traveling to debate tournaments every weekend, almost 5 years of being a road comic and countless weekends at conferences add up quickly), and I can probably count on one hand the number of times I’ve even opened the bedside drawer for any reason, much less to see if there’s a Bible there.

    Yeah, my thought exactly. I can’t remember the last time I even opened the bedside drawer in a hotel. If I did (open it and want to use the drawer), I’d probably feel towards the bible the same way I feel towards mini-bars – a waste of otherwise useful space, but not much more.

  • Kevin Kehres

    That’s an example of the type of interaction I call “arguing with the parking lot attendant”. That’s a person who didn’t make the rules, has zero authority to change the rules or even to bend them to the slightest degree without getting fired — but you’re going to argue your case as if the opposite were true.

    Waste of breath.

  • Synfandel

    I found an illustrated copy of the Kama Sutra, but it’s probably just the kind of hotel I stay in.

  • http://en.uncyclopedia.co/wiki/User:Modusoperandi Modusoperandi

    Worse, when you Liberals get Bibles removed from hotel rooms, you force your Bible on us hotel-staying Christians. That’s right: nothing!

  • http://en.uncyclopedia.co/wiki/User:Modusoperandi Modusoperandi

    Synfandel “I found an illustrated copy of the Kama Sutra, but it’s probably just the kind of hotel I stay in.”

    Those are the fire exit instructions.

  • cptdoom

    I travel a lot for my job (just figured out this morning that not only have I been to every state, but there are only 7 states I haven’t visited at least twice) and I am with Ed. I notice the bible (or the bible and the Book of Mormon, if it’s a Marriott property) only because I am a bit ADD about checking every drawer before I check out, even if I know I didn’t put anything in there. I agree it’s presumptuous to assume all your guests even want a bible, but I certainly don’t feel personally offended. I don’t tend to read the Where tourist guides either, or use all the towels, and I figure the rooms are set up to meet the needs of all kinds of guests, not just me.

  • Saad

    Modusoperandi, #10

    LOL!

  • scott

    I stayed at a place called “The Zen Hotel” in Palo Alto and alongside the ubiquitous Gideon bible there was a book on Zen placed by some Buddhist society. I considered taking it out of curiosity but I wasn’t sure if that was expected or not so I left it.

  • Trebuchet

    I’ve actually been slightly shy about checking drawers in hotels since one of my co-workers did that and found a vibrator and a large pair of panties.

  • http://twitter.com/magicthighs magicthighs

    I had the exact same reaction to that post as you did, Ed.

  • rietpluim

    I do not agree. The manager on duty is there to handle any question, complaint or issue guests may have. Speaking to him is speaking to the hotel as an organization. It the duty manager’s responsibility to forward your remarks to whoever is responsible for the contents of the drawer. And if he can’t, he should direct you to the right person. Also note how Lowe insists on being friendly. He is not annoying the duty manager. He is delivering the message. Why should this be different than any other complaint?

  • Zmidponk

    You know, Mr Lowe’s underlying point is actually valid – it is actually somewhat annoying that many hotels try to meet the religious needs of their guests, but do so by assuming that all of them are Christians. However, in trying to do something about it, most of what Mr Lowe does is a complete and utter waste of time and effort of both him and the hotel employees. The only thing that complaining about the Bible to the person at the front desk and/or the manager might do, no matter how polite and courteous or impolite and angry you are, is make you the subject of discussion in the staffroom as ‘the weirdo complaining about the Bibles’, or the subject of a little story appearing on sites like notalwaysright.com. The correct thing to do, if you feel you have to do anything at all, is actually complain to the people who might be able to do something about it, which is what Mr Lowe is doing in the last paragraph quoted in the OP.

  • Numenaster

    @Trebuchet #14, sorry about that. I’ve been wondering where I left those.

  • DrewN

    I’m guessing Mr. Lowe also spends his entire December chastising cashiers for wishing him a merry xmas.

  • eric

    Why should this be different than any other complaint?

    It isn’t; if you complain to the hotel management about trivial non-bible things and flounce about how they are going to lose a repeat customer over (examples) the color of the drapes or how the water pressure is 42 psi when you expect at least 45, you are also being an asshole.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100002686842900 ChristineRose

    Last hotel I stayed in had a K-cup coffee maker and tea bags in the room. There is no way to coax hot water out of one of those coffee makers. I didn’t complain because it would have been lousy tea anyhow and there is an awesome coffee shop with great tea just down the street.

  • Al Dente

    I’ve worked as a shift manager in a hotel. During my time I discovered there were two types of customer complaints, serious and minor. A serious complaint would be no hot water in the shower or “I broke a glass in the bathroom, could someone sweep it up?” Minor complaints are (these are actual examples) “the clock in the room is four minutes fast” or “the painting on the wall is ugly, please replace it with something more pretty.” A serious complaint would be dealt with as expeditiously as possible. A minor complaint would be passed to the hotel manager but normally no other action would be taken. If someone complained about the presence of the Gideon Bible, then I’d tell the manager “you won’t believe the silly thing some guest whined about last night.”

  • cswella

    It’s these kinds of atheists that are justifying the stereotype of the pedantic and pissant atheists. There are enough things to actually complain about (and most of those things don’t make us look like assholes) where we don’t need to make a huge fucking deal about minor things.

  • Sastra

    It’s a fucking book, sitting in a drawer where chances are very slim that you’ll ever even notice it if you don’t go looking for it. It doesn’t give off cooties. And taking this Brave Stand for Reason will do nothing at all to make religion any less bad or reduce its influence. And you’re not being an edgy activist by behaving this way, you’re just being childish.

    So the Christian privilege is so ingrained into the dull and ordinary course of things that it’s childish to protest? I don’t agree. While this isn’t a battle I personally fight, small issues can add up. Lowe seems to be going out of his way to be polite and reasonable about protesting something that a lot of people have gone out of their way to ensure has become an accepted part of the secular culture. He seems to have found his passion: I wish him well.

    Every time an issue looks a bit petty to me, I try to remember that the same complaint is routinely made for “under God” in the Pledge of Allegiance, “In God We Trust” as the national motto, and virtually every other pro-faith wedge in public life — from “Jesus is the Reason for the Season” to “everything happens for a reason” to “Let us pray.” Being too worried about looking like an asshole will keep you from looking like an asshole even when that bar has been artificially lowered practically to the ground. I don’t know. I just don’t think this particular matter is obviously too trivial.

    What does bother me though is atheists who rip up the hotel Bibles and stuff them in the toilet or whatever. Someone attending an atheist convention once told a bunch of us he did that. I told him he shouldn’t. Lowe’s article would have made a useful redirection of effort in a more positive direction.

  • timmmmm

    If you take the bible down to the front desk, what will you do if you run out of rolling papers?

  • erichoug

    Wow, I can add this to my top ten list of things not to do when you are a non-believer. Maybe you could then run down to a church youth league baseball game and burn the Bible at home plate while shouting “THERE IS NO GOD YOU FUCKING MORONS!”

    yeah creating an awkward and uncomfortable situation for a person who is following the directives of their superiors is really going to win you a lot of friends. Just like that religious nut who used to come to my work and preach to me the whole time his wife and daughter were in the ladies department shopping, What i really wanted to tell him was “Fuck off!” but as I’m at work, I just have to sit there and listed to you be a lunatic at me.

  • cswella

    @Sastra:

    Every time an issue looks a bit petty to me, I try to remember that the same complaint is routinely made for “under God” in the Pledge of Allegiance, “In God We Trust” as the national motto, and virtually every other pro-faith wedge in public life — from “Jesus is the Reason for the Season” to “everything happens for a reason” to “Let us pray.” Being too worried about looking like an asshole will keep you from looking like an asshole even when that bar has been artificially lowered practically to the ground. I don’t know. I just don’t think this particular matter is obviously too trivial.

    I can see your point, and would agree, but I think Lowe’s approach towards the desk clerk/manager on duty feels insincere. If they were placing the bible on the bed or had religious paraphernalia on the walls, then I’d support him. But considering that the bibles are in a closed drawer, and that without opening that drawer, you’d never know it was there, it’s a bit of a strong protest. Go ahead and use the online surveys provided. But protesting in person to the manager feels like your goal is to waste their time preaching to them.

    Be an asshole when it calls for it, but I don’t think this issue calls for it.

  • freemage

    Since the hotels aren’t buying the Bibles with my money (it’s the Gideons donating them), I don’t see how it’s any business of mine. It’s actually more innocuous than the coffeemaker, which presumably is bought and paid for with the money I give to the hotel, despite the fact that I never touch the stuff.

    Now, it would be interesting to see how a chain (not Mormon-affiliated) responded to a sincere effort to donate reading material by members of another faith, or of a secular organization.

    rietpluim says

    July 13, 2015 at 3:19 pm

    I do not agree. The manager on duty is there to handle any question, complaint or issue guests may have. Speaking to him is speaking to the hotel as an organization. It the duty manager’s responsibility to forward your remarks to whoever is responsible for the contents of the drawer. And if he can’t, he should direct you to the right person. Also note how Lowe insists on being friendly. He is not annoying the duty manager. He is delivering the message. Why should this be different than any other complaint?

    Actually, the duty manager is there to deal with complaints that he can actually help with. For instance, if your non-smoking room smells of cigarette smoke, or there was an error in your booking, or housekeeping just stormed in ignoring the Do Not Disturb sign. Corporate policy, on the other hand, is dealt with at levels far above, and most such complaints will not be passed along as you suggest. Instead, the proper thing to do if you really want to score the point is simply to ask the desk manager to give you the contact information for the corporate office. It’ll still be Quixotic, but at least you’ll be wasting the right person’s time.

    ******

    My favorite hotel Bible story, courtesy of Neil Gaiman, while on his book tour for American Gods:

    He was in the final writing stages–re-writes, small tweaks, and, significantly, chapter-quotes, those little bits at the beginning of each chapter that set the tone. He was in Vegas, while working on the Vegas chapter. He was staying in a hotel that was slated for demolition; he gave an amusing description of staying at an ever-more-empty hotel, as fewer and fewer guests were present in the halls and lobby.

    He decided he wanted to use the bit about the Queen of Sheba from the Book of Solomon as the chapter-quote for Vegas. So, he went to the table to get the ever-reliable Gideon. Unfortunately, it was one of those more modern translations, with contemporary language instead of the florid King James Version–which, of course, was what he wanted.

    So, he phoned down to the desk and asked the night clerk if he could have a King James Bible, instead. (He failed to explain why.) There was a pause, and then the clerk requested confirmation that he wanted a different Bible. He confirmed it, and the clerk agreed to have one come up.

    A few minutes later, there was a knock at the door, and Gaiman opened it to find three men–I believe it was the clerk, the bellhop and the night manager, but I’m not one hundred percent certain of my memory, here–standing, like the three wise men, the KJV Bible in hand, held out to him in a kind of awe. One of them said it was the first time anyone had ever actually requested a Bible.

    Gaiman thanked them, took the KJV and gave them the contemporary language one in exchange. He then went back to writing, only to discover that this particular copy had a badly mangled printing, causing the specific page he needed to be rendered illegible.

    He closed the tale by saying he just hadn’t had the heart to call down to the desk again and explain what happened.

  • http://home.comcast.net/~eoraptor/Home.html Mickey Mortimer

    rietpluim- You obviously have no idea how businesses work. As a general rule, no one you’ll ever see at a business has any control over the policies of that company. Your thought that the manager of any business has the ability to forward complaints to anyone with the power to change company policy, and that the latter would actually listen to the opinion of someone who works in the hotel, is amusingly naive though.

  • pixiedust

    @28

    That’s hilarious! Thanks.

  • sigurd jorsalfar

    I’m sure Mr. Lowe will be thrilled when the hotel announces its new policy — a Koran, Talmud, Book of Mormon, Rig Veda, Dyanetics and Bible in every room. Sure the room will feel smaller and cramped with all those books, but that way everyone, not just that one hotel desk clerk, can experience how much of an asshole Steve Lowe is.

  • captain_spleen

    When I find a phone book in my hotel room, I take it to the front desk, and ask, “Is this hotel only for people who don’t know how to use Google?”

  • captain_spleen

    #17 “it is actually somewhat annoying that many hotels try to meet the religious needs of their guests, but do so by assuming that all of them are Christians.”

    The hotels aren’t buying them, they’re donated by the Gideons. The extent of the hotel’s involvement is a) not throwing them out, and perhaps b) taking part in whatever process exists for the Gideons to replace Bibles that have been taken by a hotel guest. (I would guess the Gideons just provide more Bibles than there are rooms, and the hotel just replaces them from that supply.)

    This guy would be more effectual if he obtained a supply of some atheist book, glued in some bookplates saying “free for you to keep, provided by Whatever Atheist Organization”, and left one next to the Bible in each hotel he stays at.

    (Things being as they are, I wouldn’t bet on such a book lasting very long, as it would probably be trashed by a hotel guest or the cleaning staff.)

  • http://www.gregory-gadow.net Gregory in Seattle

    If I’m in an annoyed mood, I’ll throw the Bible away in the dumpster out back (and not in the room trash, where it will only be replaced by housekeeping): it is technically abandoned property, having been left behind by the Gideon’s, and thus belongs to neither the hotel or a recently departed guest. Problem solved.

  • photon

    Mr Lowe seems to be unaware that there is an established protocol for dealing with unwanted hotel bibles.

    (1) Do not remove or damage the bible: it’s not yours, it’s Gideon’s, and one day he might want it back.

    (2) Place the bible in a safe, well concealed place.

    (3) If there in already a bible in your chosen hiding place you must find an alternative hiding place.

    (4) For extra credit, hide it in plain sight, ie. put it somewhere it can be easily seen (without having to move furniture, etc) by anyone who is really paying attention to their surroundings, but will be missed by most people.

    Remember kids: Behind the TV is obvious & boring! Try to be inventive!

    Even the Christians want to get in on the fun!

  • call me mark

    I have to confess that I sometimes sign a dedication in the Bible in a hotel:

    “To my good friend Gideon, have a great summer, God”

  • Synfandel

    Gideon checked out

    And he left it, no doubt

    To help with good Rocky’s revival.

  • eric

    Sastra @24:

    1. Yes, it’s childish. Just as it would be childish to complain about a Romance novel left in a hotel room for you or the USA today put outside your door in the mornings. The hotel left you some bit of reading material that doesn’t take up much space. Treat it as you would any other bit of reading material left in your room that you don’t have any interest in reading.

    2. This is not comparable to the pledge or our currency for the obvious reason that a private hotel chain is not the government, and thus their speech cannot in any way be considered government endorsement If you want to complain about bibles in military base hotels or at national park lodges or at state-funded university lodgings, you’ll have a better point. But here, IMO, the complaint just comes off as petty. Like going into someone else’s house, seeing a cross, and demanding they take it down or you won’t be friends with them any more. Who does that?

  • Dunc

    I’ll know things are really getting interesting when I get a hotel room that has a copy of the Tao Te Ching, or maybe a Bhagavad Gita.

    I once stayed in a hotel in France that had a copy of The Teachings of Buddha alongside the inevitable Bible. It was a much better read.

  • rietpluim

    This is not a small issue. It is not like “there is this one book in my room that I don’t want to read”. It is “there is a bible in my room, only a bible and no other book, and not only in my room but in virtually every hotel room on the country”. It’s a sad thing when even atheist activists do not recognize Christian privilege when they see it.

  • rietpluim

    @Mickey Mortimer #29 – Thank you, I’ll take that as a compliment. I know how businesses work, and how they work is part of the problem. You could expect me to accept that. You might as well expect me to accept racism or misogyny but I prefer to be called naive.

  • lofgren

    “Part of the problem?” Comparing bibles in your hotel room to racism and misogyny? You forgot to mention how much hotel bibles are like Hitler and Stalin. And naivete has never been helpful to anything.

    Seriously though, this actually bothers people?

  • Georgia Sam

    I like to slip notes inside the front covers of hotel Bibles, directing the reader’s attention to passages such as Genesis 30: 37-43.

    BTW, I’ve seen the Book of Mormon alongside the Bible in hotel rooms outside of Utah.

  • http://www.facebook.com/kitwalker1990 chriswalker

    1) As someone who has worked in big retail for seven years as a powerless drone, the most powerful person on any corporate property has power power to change things that infinitely approaches zero. The next person above their head? The power they wield can be boiled down to “I can tell them to ignore customer complaints”. So even if I agreed with the overall point the guy was making, I’d disagree with his methodology.

    2) Those Bibles are donated. Complaining about them being in the room is not unlike complaining that you don’t like the tourist brochures or pizza place coupons left in your room. The hotel receives them free of charge and passes them along to their guests as a courtesy.

    3) It’s not just Bibles, as others have pointed out. Because the Gideons seem to have infinite reach and money, Bibles are the only ubiquitous ones but depending on chain and location, you can and will find other holy books provided. Atheist organizations could donate some small book or another to hotel chains, but we tend to focus our money on things that actually achieve something.

  • eric

    Atheist organizations could donate some small book or another to hotel chains, but we tend to focus our money on things that actually achieve something.

    Yep. Moreover, if some Christian discovered a Dawkins book in the bedstand and got all bent out of shape about it, informing the management and deciding to boycott the entire chain, we’d probably point and laugh at their overreaction. So word to the wise, don’t be that guy we point and laugh at.

  • cswella

    @40 Rietpluim:

    This is not a small issue. It is not like “there is this one book in my room that I don’t want to read”. It is “there is a bible in my room, only a bible and no other book, and not only in my room but in virtually every hotel room on the country”. It’s a sad thing when even atheist activists do not recognize Christian privilege when they see it.

    Well, you can either campaign all the other religions and beliefs to also donate literature to hotels/motels, or campaign to tell businesses to turn down free goodwill that appeals to the majority of the country’s beliefs. Let me know which one works.

    Efforts to actually make a difference for this issue vastly outweigh the importance of doing so.

  • http://onhandcomments.blogspot.com/ left0ver1under

    When I check in to a hotel, I call the front desk and get them to empty the minibar. (No, I’m not a skinflint for refusing to pay three times what something’s worth.) At the same time, I gather together the buybull and any other unwanted garbage (e.g. the room service menu) and have it also removed.

    Some hotels don’t like me terming the buybull as garbage (especially those in the Philippines) but they balk more about the removal of revenue generating crap than the religious twaddle.

  • Zmidponk

    captain_spleen:

    #17 “it is actually somewhat annoying that many hotels try to meet the religious needs of their guests, but do so by assuming that all of them are Christians.”

    The hotels aren’t buying them, they’re donated by the Gideons. The extent of the hotel’s involvement is a) not throwing them out, and perhaps b) taking part in whatever process exists for the Gideons to replace Bibles that have been taken by a hotel guest. (I would guess the Gideons just provide more Bibles than there are rooms, and the hotel just replaces them from that supply.)

    I realise that these are donated Bibles, but, assuming that it is the case that the Gideons do actively approach the hotel in question and offer these Bibles, if the hotel owners want to be fair to all the varied religious views of their actual and/or potential guests, they should simply say ‘no thanks’ unless they intend to then actively solicit similar donations from other religious groups, otherwise they’re simply allowing the Gideons to persuade them to give the Christian religion preferential treatment in their hotel. However, the guy at the front desk or the duty manager is unlikely to actually be the owner, especially if it’s one of a chain of hotels, so complaining to them about this is simply a waste of everyone’s time.

  • ianrennie

    I can’t imagine being upset, or particularly caring, about a book being left in a room. Going to the point of complaining to a hotel clerk is

    1) performative outrage designed to make you feel like you’ve Done Something

    2) entirely counterproductive as the Something that you have Done is to convince a hotel clerk that atheists are dicks

    Christian privilege does exist. Society is, in all sorts of ways, skewed to make lives easier for the followers of Religion A than it is for the followers of Religions B-Z or those who don’t follow a religion at all. There are serious and damaging examples of this. A book in a hotel room isn’t one of them.

  • colnago80

    In all of this, it should be noted that the books are donated by the Gideon Society and don’t cost the hotel a dime. Thus, they don’t cost the room renters a dime either so it would seem that they don’t really have much to bitch about. Money talks and bullshit walks.

  • dingojack

    Numenaster (#18) – Shit, sorry about that — if I’d known I wouldn’t have used them! (I thought they were Trebuchet’s Great Grandfather’s!)

    :) Dingo

  • dingojack

    A few comments –

    1.) If you’re going to complain – complain to the organ-grinder not the monkey.

    Why not:

    a) find out who actually owns the hotel

    b) complain, in writing, to them? (Why not use hotel stationery).

    Written complaints tend to get answers.

    2.) Why would a hotel not accept a donated bible (or any other religious text for that matter)?

    What are they going to say: ‘We would like to accept your donation of a scripture, but you’ll have to wait, just in case The Latter-Day Hula-Hoop-Neon-Marilyn-Munroe-in-a-Pink-Tutu Church (& Carwash) decides not to donate one of it’s scriptures, then the deal’s off for fear of appearing to favour one religious position over another’?

    No, they’ll just say ‘fine, go ahead if you want to’, knowing full well that most literature will be ignored by the guests anyway. Hell, guests ignore the safety instructions printed for their safety on signs in their rooms, do you actually think they’re going to read (and miraculously convert, no less) because of religious literature hidden in a drawer?

    As far as I know, Gideon’s donate bibles to hotels/motels etc. on an non-exclusive basis — anyone can do it. If you want to spread your viewpoint via people who are so bored with the porn channel that they’re willing to read a dull religious tract, knock yourself out, make the hotel an offer!

    Dingo

  • dingojack

    Freemage (#28) – I think Neil Gaiman missed a trick here.

    He should have closed the door quickly, then shouted very loudly ‘The name of Christ compels you, depart!’ a few times — just to freak out any overly nosey staff.

    ;D Dingo

  • stewartt1982

    There is a hotel chain that I’ve stayed at in Japan a few times. Often the drawer contains a book on Buddhism, or a manga, but sometimes it contains nationalistic Japanese right-wing literature (which is by far my favourite/makes me much more sad than if I’d found a bible)

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