Woman Drives to South Carolina to Weep Over Confederate Flag

In addition to the tears of anti-gay bigots I’ve been enjoying lately, I’m also enjoying the tears of those who are, quite literally, crying over their precious Confederate flag being taken down in South Carolina and elsewhere. This video I found particularly enjoyable.

wistv.com – Columbia, South Carolina

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  • Saad

    People bring me to tears too when they pick on me for my swastika bumper sticker. They don’t even stop to think that maybe I just love Die Meistersinger.

  • http://drx.typepad.com Dr X

    Fuck Southern pride. Southern Pride is nothing but overcompensation for the humiliation of their white supremacist ancestors who were trounced in the Civil War by the North. They’ve been overcompensating ever since. Sort that out honestly and you’ll feel better.

  • http://drx.typepad.com Dr X

    @1 Saad,

    It’s so unfair. Why can’t people leave aside the genocide and just take pride the history?

  • http://drx.typepad.com Dr X

    @1 Saad,

    It’s so unfair. Why can’t people leave aside the genocide and just take pride the history?

  • http://drx.typepad.com Dr X

    Notice the North won the Civil War and the Northern cause was a more just cause, but Northerners don’t blubber over Northern Pride or insist on flying any of the Union Battle flags 150 years after the end of the Civil War. Southern Pride and confederate battle flag idolatry are defensive overcompensations for the shame of their evil cause and the humiliation of defeat.

  • http://drx.typepad.com Dr X

    Notice the North won the Civil War and the Northern cause was a more just cause, but Northerners don’t blubber over Northern Pride or insist on flying any of the Union Battle flags 150 years after the end of the Civil War. Southern Pride and confederate battle flag idolatry are defensive overcompensations for the shame of their evil cause and the humiliation of defeat.

  • Saad

    Dr X,

    Yes, and they always seem to stop at just saying “It’s Southern pride”. I wonder what they’ll say if pressed to elaborate. Pride in what aspect of the Confederacy and post-Confederacy South? Also, why use the flag that was brought back in the fight against desegregation? It’s one of the most thinly veiled cases of racism ever. They probably think they’re being very subtle.

  • scienceavenger

    The million $ question: What aspect of “southern pride” does the flag of the confederacy illustrate that the American flag does not?

    As for poor Brandy: take a few sips of your namesake while listening to The Band sing “The Night They Drove Ol Dixie Down”, respectfully tuck away all your confederate paraphernalia, and move on.

  • http://motherwell.livejournal.com/ Raging Bee

    Wow, and I thought crying about Elvis was silly. And this shit was labeled “breaking news?”

    The million $ question: What aspect of “southern pride” does the flag of the confederacy illustrate that the American flag does not?

    Jazz! Yeah, that’s it, jazz…

  • Childermass

    Maybe we need to start. Anyone want to start reproducing Union battle flags. Many regiments had their own. Maybe some researcher can dig up battle flags used by troops who used to be slaves.

  • John Pieret

    Yes, indeed … Southern Pride in their ancestors who were traitors and slavers.

  • eric

    @6: heck, don’t tuck it away. Fly it over your house, on your car, whatever, all you want. Just because the state courthouse stops doing something doesn’t mean you have to stop doing it too.

    This is exactly like the 10 Commandments issue; (she needs to) stop thinking that the government’s lawn is your lawn or vice versa.

  • http://drx.typepad.com Dr X

    First Kansas Colored Infantry:

    https://www.kshs.org/kansapedia/cool-things-first-kansas-colored-infantry-flag/10125

    Proudly fly that flag over the Kansas State Capital. No problem because it represents loyalty to the United States of America.

  • caseloweraz

    I can’t get the video to play in Firefox. But I fired up IE8 (gulp) and went to the WIS-TV site. I was able to watch an earth-shattering story about the concrete pad that used to support the flagpole being torn up by a jackhammer.

    Unfortunately, being pressed for time, I had to pass up the video from the turkey testicle festival…

    Anyway, I know I can watch Brandy if I really want to.

  • Saad

    scienceavenger, #6

    What aspect of “southern pride” does the flag of the confederacy illustrate that the American flag does not?

    Beautiful. Gonna be using that from now on.

  • Sastra

    Aw, more privileged “heartfelt belief” being shattered as someone fails to consider that, as eric #10 pointed out, the government has to represent those Southerners whose ancestors were slaves and no, they’ve never seen it as a sign of generic Southern Pride. Fly it on your own damn lawn; you can’t piss your personal prejudices on State property and claim it as your territory. She keeps talking about the “history” of the flag as if that wasn’t the very problem.

    Also, I’ll tangentially note that wearing the American flag as an article of clothing is iirc technically a sign of disrespect.

  • Hoosier X

    Yes, indeed … Southern Pride in their ancestors who were traitors and slavers.

    Not all of them were slavers. Some of them were just tools.

    Nothing says “I’m a pathetic tool” as forcefully as devotion to the Confederate flag.

  • Hoosier X

    Yes, indeed … Southern Pride in their ancestors who were traitors and slavers.

    Not all of them were slavers. Some of them were just tools.

    Nothing says “I’m a pathetic tool” as forcefully as devotion to the Confederate flag.

  • raven

    Yes, and they always seem to stop at just saying “It’s Southern pride”.

    Southern Pride about what?

    The south leads in the nation is any social problem you care to name. Teen age pregnancy, drug and alcohol abuse, new HIV/AIDS infections, child homicide, child sexual abuse, low social mobility, membership in hate groups, membership in perverted fundie cults.

    They are poorer and less educated than the rest of the USA.

    In general the southern states get far more in federal dollars than they pay in taxes. Krugman says South Carolina gets $5 back for every dollar they send in.

    There is a Silicon valley, Silicon forest, Silicon Boston suburbs. There is no Silicon Dogpatch.

    We would be ecstatic if the south caught up with the rest of the USA.

  • raven

    Yes, and they always seem to stop at just saying “It’s Southern pride”.

    Southern Pride about what?

    The south leads in the nation is any social problem you care to name. Teen age pregnancy, drug and alcohol abuse, new HIV/AIDS infections, child homicide, child sexual abuse, low social mobility, membership in hate groups, membership in perverted fundie cults.

    They are poorer and less educated than the rest of the USA.

    In general the southern states get far more in federal dollars than they pay in taxes. Krugman says South Carolina gets $5 back for every dollar they send in.

    There is a Silicon valley, Silicon forest, Silicon Boston suburbs. There is no Silicon Dogpatch.

    We would be ecstatic if the south caught up with the rest of the USA.

  • maddog1129

    Video won’t play for me; I get an endless round robin of commercials instead.

  • moarscienceplz

    To me it just feels like everything is going backwards! Everybody is all about equality.

    Yeah! How can southern whites feel superior if everybody is now equal? You didn’t think about that, did you, you flag-burners putters-into-a-museum?

  • moarscienceplz

    To me it just feels like everything is going backwards! Everybody is all about equality.

    Yeah! How can southern whites feel superior if everybody is now equal? You didn’t think about that, did you, you flag-burners putters-into-a-museum?

  • fusilier

    Linkie Of The Day Award to DrX @11

    I gots to get me one of them flags.

    fusilier

    James 2:24

  • fusilier

    Linkie Of The Day Award to DrX @11

    I gots to get me one of them flags.

    fusilier

    James 2:24

  • abb3w

    @16, raven

    Southern Pride about what?

    Mostly? Being proud, it seems.

  • abb3w

    @16, raven

    Southern Pride about what?

    Mostly? Being proud, it seems.

  • http://www.ranum.com Marcus Ranum

    Southern Pride about what?

    For losing really badly in a stupid war they never had a chance of winning, of course!!

  • http://www.ranum.com Marcus Ranum

    Southern Pride about what?

    For losing really badly in a stupid war they never had a chance of winning, of course!!

  • macallan

    Also, I’ll tangentially note that wearing the American flag as an article of clothing is iirc technically a sign of disrespect.

    Yeah, someone posted the actual US flag code here a while ago. IIRC burning it was the proper way to dispose of one. Cue more heads asploding.

  • whheydt

    Let me put it this way…

    One of my great grandfathers (born 1843 in upstate New York) moved to New Orleans to live with relatives after his father died in 1853. With a few complications having to do with his age, he served in a Louisiana based cavalry unit for pretty much the entire war. So he served honorably in a dishonorable cause.

    I think that establishes my bona fides to discuss this subject of this thread.

    After the war, he had the mother wit to go north and find a job (with a railroad), finally retiring at the age of 75. So far as I can tell, he had a special bond with my father (and, I presume, my uncle) as my grandfather died when my father was seven (1917). He died in 1936. There is a lot to be proud of with regard to my great grandfather. Fighting for the Confederacy is not one of them, and no one in the family (so far as I know) goes in for any sort of “Southern Pride” or would have anything at all to do with the Confederate Battle Flag.

    I have other roots that go deep in the South. One ancestor commanded a warship that was part of the Revolutionary South Carolina Navy, the Brig Notre Dame, variously listed as having 16 or 18 guns (common in the period as ships often carried more guns than they were “rated” for, e.g. USS Constitution, rated 44 guns carried 54 guns during the War of 1812).

    For myself, I will have nothing to do with the flag other than condemning the supposed devotion that some of these people express and correcting those who mis-name it as the “Stars and Bars”.

  • whheydt

    Let me put it this way…

    One of my great grandfathers (born 1843 in upstate New York) moved to New Orleans to live with relatives after his father died in 1853. With a few complications having to do with his age, he served in a Louisiana based cavalry unit for pretty much the entire war. So he served honorably in a dishonorable cause.

    I think that establishes my bona fides to discuss this subject of this thread.

    After the war, he had the mother wit to go north and find a job (with a railroad), finally retiring at the age of 75. So far as I can tell, he had a special bond with my father (and, I presume, my uncle) as my grandfather died when my father was seven (1917). He died in 1936. There is a lot to be proud of with regard to my great grandfather. Fighting for the Confederacy is not one of them, and no one in the family (so far as I know) goes in for any sort of “Southern Pride” or would have anything at all to do with the Confederate Battle Flag.

    I have other roots that go deep in the South. One ancestor commanded a warship that was part of the Revolutionary South Carolina Navy, the Brig Notre Dame, variously listed as having 16 or 18 guns (common in the period as ships often carried more guns than they were “rated” for, e.g. USS Constitution, rated 44 guns carried 54 guns during the War of 1812).

    For myself, I will have nothing to do with the flag other than condemning the supposed devotion that some of these people express and correcting those who mis-name it as the “Stars and Bars”.

  • maddog1129

    Sastra @ #14

    Also, I’ll tangentially note that wearing the American flag as an article of clothing is iirc technically a sign of disrespect.

    I think that, technically, what those people are wearing don’t count as “wearing the flag as an article of clothing.” The clothes aren’t made of actual flags, but are only evocative of flag symbolism. Athletes who drape the flag around their shoulders come much closer to that sort of disrespect, but the uber patriots don’t seem to complain about that kind of display.

  • maddog1129

    Sastra @ #14

    Also, I’ll tangentially note that wearing the American flag as an article of clothing is iirc technically a sign of disrespect.

    I think that, technically, what those people are wearing don’t count as “wearing the flag as an article of clothing.” The clothes aren’t made of actual flags, but are only evocative of flag symbolism. Athletes who drape the flag around their shoulders come much closer to that sort of disrespect, but the uber patriots don’t seem to complain about that kind of display.

  • pixiedust

    See? Taking down the flag increased tourism.

  • pixiedust

    See? Taking down the flag increased tourism.

  • magistramarla

    whheydt,

    My husband’s family had a clothing manufacturing factory in New England for several generations. We were proud to find out that the factory manufactured uniforms for the Union Army. I have some jewelry that has been dated to the Civil War era. We believe that some of it may have been traded to the family in exchange for uniforms. I have an incredibly beautiful amethyst cross that made an Episcopal bishop drool. He agreed with us that it might have been traded for uniforms, having been sacrificed by the local bishop to help his parishioners who had volunteered.

    Hubby’s grandmother had two of the jewels removed and made into earrings. The set is stunning to wear to formal events.

    We northerners aren’t as obnoxious about it, but we have pride in what our ancestors did in the war too.

  • magistramarla

    whheydt,

    My husband’s family had a clothing manufacturing factory in New England for several generations. We were proud to find out that the factory manufactured uniforms for the Union Army. I have some jewelry that has been dated to the Civil War era. We believe that some of it may have been traded to the family in exchange for uniforms. I have an incredibly beautiful amethyst cross that made an Episcopal bishop drool. He agreed with us that it might have been traded for uniforms, having been sacrificed by the local bishop to help his parishioners who had volunteered.

    Hubby’s grandmother had two of the jewels removed and made into earrings. The set is stunning to wear to formal events.

    We northerners aren’t as obnoxious about it, but we have pride in what our ancestors did in the war too.

  • whheydt

    Re: magistramaria @ #26…

    No argument from me. I have seen some indications that relatives of my great-gradfather (the one referenced previously) fought in the Union Army. There are some other things to be proud of in my ancestry, and some of that more or less contemporaneous with the Civil War (and I should note that my grandfather, father and myself were all born in NYC). Another great-grandfather was, so far as we can tell, a draft dodger…from the Prussian side of the Franco-Prussian War of 1870. Two of my grandparents came to the US from Denmark a bit after 1900, and that grandfather refused to trade in worn out cars in the 1930s on the grounds that they would be scrapped and sold to the Japanese…and shot back at us. He was right, but how many people in the mid-1930s figured that out?

  • whheydt

    Re: magistramaria @ #26…

    No argument from me. I have seen some indications that relatives of my great-gradfather (the one referenced previously) fought in the Union Army. There are some other things to be proud of in my ancestry, and some of that more or less contemporaneous with the Civil War (and I should note that my grandfather, father and myself were all born in NYC). Another great-grandfather was, so far as we can tell, a draft dodger…from the Prussian side of the Franco-Prussian War of 1870. Two of my grandparents came to the US from Denmark a bit after 1900, and that grandfather refused to trade in worn out cars in the 1930s on the grounds that they would be scrapped and sold to the Japanese…and shot back at us. He was right, but how many people in the mid-1930s figured that out?

  • postwaste

    I got into a brief, rather heated argument with my parents concerning the Confederate flag today. What stunned me was how quickly they both, for lack of a better term, freaked out. I mean, zero to furious in seconds. Then my dad went into a rant about “The Cause” and how Obama is taking the country to the same condition as then.

    The weird part is, growing up, we never displayed the flag. I never heard about Southern Pride or any kind of sympathy for the South. Dad was not particularly racist. I knew they were conservative, but this was freaking scary. It’s not political it’s something else.

  • http://www.facebook.com/eo.raptor.3 eoraptor

    I have similar sorts of feelings about my Mormon background. (I was baptised as a Mormon, but it never really took.) My mother’s side of the family literally goes back to the founding of the church; one of my forebears being an associate of John Talks-Through-His-Hat Smith. While past and present Mormons, as individuals, are a little (hah!) loopy, my family did settle much of the West. Lee’s Ferry, across the Colorado, was established by my multiple-great grandfather on both sides of my mother’s family, John D. Lee. His other claim to fame was being tried and convicted as the ringleader of the group that committed the Mountain Meadow Massacre. Had to dig his own grave before they stood him up next to it and shot him dead. Another ancestor surveyed the last stretch of the Union Pacific railroad down the mountains and into Orem, Utah. He was present at the driving of the Golden Spike, and is immediately obvious (at least to family) in the famous picture commemorating the event.

    So, while I have no truck with Mormon theology or practice, ALL YOUR WEST ARE BELONG TO ME!!!

  • http://www.facebook.com/eo.raptor.3 eoraptor

    I have similar sorts of feelings about my Mormon background. (I was baptised as a Mormon, but it never really took.) My mother’s side of the family literally goes back to the founding of the church; one of my forebears being an associate of John Talks-Through-His-Hat Smith. While past and present Mormons, as individuals, are a little (hah!) loopy, my family did settle much of the West. Lee’s Ferry, across the Colorado, was established by my multiple-great grandfather on both sides of my mother’s family, John D. Lee. His other claim to fame was being tried and convicted as the ringleader of the group that committed the Mountain Meadow Massacre. Had to dig his own grave before they stood him up next to it and shot him dead. Another ancestor surveyed the last stretch of the Union Pacific railroad down the mountains and into Orem, Utah. He was present at the driving of the Golden Spike, and is immediately obvious (at least to family) in the famous picture commemorating the event.

    So, while I have no truck with Mormon theology or practice, ALL YOUR WEST ARE BELONG TO ME!!!

  • sigurd jorsalfar

    It’s not political it’s something else.

    postwaste, it’s Fox News.

  • sigurd jorsalfar

    It’s not political it’s something else.

    postwaste, it’s Fox News.