Android vs iPhone’s iOS is Windows vs Mac OS all over again!

iPhone was the first real smartphone in the world and extremely user friendly.  The Geeks and the tech-lovers have until now been swooning over every new version.  Those who love the breakaway technical excellence know that iPhones have been the winners.

But, recently Android has gained 75% market share amongst the Smartphone OS.  So, is Android the best OS out there?  The answer from the experts is NO!

Android is the king not because it is the best, but because it is the cheapest and manufacturers can implement it for nothing and pass on the savings to the consumers.  As for the consumers – middle class and lower – they can do all the basics like checking emails, facebook, instagram, twitter, take pictures and videos etc.  They don’t necessarily care if their experience is as jazzy as on, say, an iPhone.

The last study conducted by the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project shows that Android is the chosen smartphone of people without money. Among respondents, 22-percent of those with annual incomes below $30,000 were Android owners, as opposed to just 12 percent for iPhone. With those towards the lower-middle class, the trend holds: Android owns 23-percent of incomes up to $50,000, with iPhones at 18. The data makes it clear: the less money you have, the more likely you are to opt for an Android phone over something more expensive. (link)

While for the higher end smartphone users, Samsung is holding the fort against iPhone with its Galaxy SIII and Note 2; the real battle is in the hinterlands.  That is where the people are on Android.  In the US, the Blacks and Hispanics are overwhelmingly on Android.  If you look at China, majority of the phones there are Android based because Chinese manufacturers can use the OS on some really useful hardware to give value for money to the users.

Why is Google “carpet-bombing” the smartphone market with Android?  It is even making apps for iPhone which are superior to Apple’s own?  The answer lies in the adoption of Google’s products and the associated Ad revenues that it gets.

Now think about it, don’t you get the feeling of the OS wars between Microsoft and Apple’s Mac in the 1980s and 1990s, which led to the downfall of Apple then?  The legacy of Steve Jobs is tough to emulate.  It is to so severely beat the market at innovation, that no one can even come close and hope (Jobs knew though!) that there will be enough people in the world who would queue up for 10-12 hours to buy your product right away!

 


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