Last Night at Yoga

My teacher was showing us some really wild things she has learned to do with her abdominal muscles. She blows out all her breath, pulls her abs back toward her spine, then is able to release and contract individual muscles so that a wave ripples back and forth across her belly. It’s wild to watch. [Read More...]

Because I’m Not Funny Enough to Write My Own April Fool’s Post….

….I turn to my more humorous pals. My friend Rachel Stone (about whose new book Eat with Joy I blogged last week), covers the evangelical and Roman Catholic backlash to proposed measures to provide birth control to rats in the New York City subway. (The first paragraph—all true.) And fellow Patheos blogger David Hayward (a.k.a. [Read More...]

No, the Crucifixion is Not About Bloody Child Sacrifice Being Necessary for Forgiveness

In my post Message to the Nones, which countered some popular but wrong-headed notions of what Christians believe about suffering, one commenter said that his major beef with Christianity is the penal substitution theory of the atonement. The good news for that commenter, and many people who have struggled with that notion (including me) is [Read More...]

Rachel Stone’s “Eat with Joy”: Why Healthy Eating Goes Beyond What We Eat

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It is fitting that I’m writing this review of Rachel Stone’s new book Eat with Joy (InterVarsity Press 2013) while eating lunch at a local French café—an establishment that embodies why Rachel insists on seeing an authentically made French baguette as a gift to be enjoyed, white flour and all, in her generous, thoughtful, creative, [Read More...]

Is That the Whir of Helicopter Blades? On Lavish Maternal Love vs. Overbearing Control

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I had dinner the other night with my play group/moms’ group/book group. We are a bunch of late 30s to early 50s moms who met at a local community center when we each had our first child, 13 years ago. We spent years gathering on Friday mornings at each others’ homes for bagels, coffee, and [Read More...]

[Me & My Naturopath] Why I’m a Hopeful Skeptic

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Fed up with my increasing impairment due to chronic pain, I went to see a naturopath last week. I left her office with plans and recommendations for a five-pronged approach to lessening my pain, and increasing my strength and function: 1. Weekly acupuncture 2. Regular yoga practice 3. An anti-inflammatory diet (such as this one). [Read More...]

Remembering Gordon Cosby

Word came to me this morning that Gordon Cosby, who founded the D.C.-based Church of the Saviour in the 194os with his wife Mary, has died at age 95. The Church of the Saviour was the first Christian community I found that took both Jesus and social justice seriously, emphasizing both the “inward journey” (prayer, [Read More...]

Lonely People in Basements with Guns (& Why They Matter Too)

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From all the fraught conversations I witnessed or participated in after the Sandy Hook shooting on December 14, 2012, I keep recalling one line: I wish these guys [mentally unstable people with guns] would go back to shooting themselves in basements, instead of taking a bunch of other people with them. The shooting at Sandy [Read More...]

Living Well with More: Learning to Love (or at Least Accept) My Kids’ Stuff

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Graham Hill’s op ed about living well with less in last Sunday’s New York Times started like this: I LIVE in a 420-square-foot studio. I sleep in a bed that folds down from the wall. I have six dress shirts. I have 10 shallow bowls that I use for salads and main dishes. When people [Read More...]

Taboo Stories About Disability: What We’re Not Allowed to Say

Last week’s New York Times featured a story about Joshua Miele, who at the age of four in 1973, answered the door of his Brooklyn home to a man he recognized as a neighbor. The man, for no reason other than his disordered thinking due to mental illness, threw acid into the boy’s face. A [Read More...]

When Conflicting Stories Are Both True: Illness, Identity, and the Tales We Tell of Living with Disability

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In his vast and gripping book, Far from the Tree: Parents, Children, and the Search for Identity, journalist Andrew Solomon discusses the two narratives that we use when we talk about life with disability in general, and/or with particular conditions, such as dwarfism, deafness, Down syndrome, autism, or my own genetic disorder, osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). [Read More...]

Bless Those Who Curse You (& Don’t Call Them Eugenicists, Moral Monsters, or Murderers)

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A friend recently sent me an article written by an Australian man who has the same bone disorder I do (osteogenesis imperfecta, or OI). Writing for the Christian journal First Things, Philip C. Burcham tells a compelling story of his family’s OI history. Seeking promising new treatments for his daughter, who inherited OI from him, [Read More...]


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