Disability as the Last Acceptable Prejudice: A Farewell Blog Post (For Now)

In the face of entrenched prejudice and misunderstanding about disabilities and the people who live with them, we have to start somewhere. I’ve chosen to start by telling my story, with its contradictions, over and over and over. [Read more…]

The Three Worst Stories That “Me Before You” Tells About Disability

Me Before You tells three particularly damaging stories about life with a disability. [Read more…]

Please Don’t Post a Photo of Your Kid’s Broken Arm, For Her Sake (& Mine)

We can help people understand what it means to live with a disability without shining too bright a beam on someone else’s life story—particularly when that someone is a child either incapable of giving consent or of understanding the long-term implications of having his or her worst, most painful, and most vulnerable moments preserved online. [Read more…]

This Lent, I’m Learning to Walk Again

When an early Easter will likely dawn gray and cold, snow still on the ground and kids still sniffling, when our colorful Easter clothes will be hidden under damp wool and dingy down jackets, when the earth’s transformation from winter to spring will appear only tentatively, obscured, then what of our transformation? Perhaps an early Easter is a truer reflection of how resurrection usually manifests, faltering and barely noticeable—a slightly higher slant of light, a whiff of damp soil carried on a chill wind, a patch of grass at the yard’s edge where the snow has begun to melt. I am desperate these days for transformation, for obvious and spectacular change in body, mind, and spirit. Especially body. But tenuous and equivocal transformation may be the best I can get.
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Chronic Pain, Shame, & Being Dependent (Not Addicted) to Opioids

The simple fact that I’ve found an effective treatment allowing me to live an active life with significant disability is obscured by the controversy, fear, stigma and caution that surround opioid prescribing.
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A Cancer Memoir that (Mostly) Gets It Right

I have rarely read a book that inspired so many different reactions, in such quick succession, as Heather King’s new memoir Stripped: At the Intersection of Cancer, Culture, and Christ. On one page, I would be nodding in recognition with gratitude for such skilled descriptions of what it feels like to confront our bodily frailties, [Read More…]

After 25 Years of the ADA, What Disabled People Most Want (Hint: It’s Not More Ramps)

Yesterday marked 25 years since President George H.W. Bush signed the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) into law. Articles, blog posts, and Facebook statuses celebrated the landmark legislation, pointing out where progress has been made and where work still needs to be done. I was particularly moved by two things I came across yesterday. The [Read More…]

Seven Favorite Posts on Disability, in Honor of the ADA’s 25th Anniversary

On the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), I’m sharing seven of my favorite and most widely read posts on disability. [Read more…]