On a Difficult Anniversary, Making Room for the Better Stories


I will always remember that terrible June day in 2009. But I’ve reached a point now where I can breathe a little easier than I used to. I can think of all the other stories I can tell about my girl, and that she can tell about herself, stories that matter just as much as the story of her accident, if not more. [Read more...]

On Assisted Suicide and Chronic Pain, Sex and Prayer, DNA and Ice Buckets: Top 10 Posts of 2014

The 10 most-read blog posts of 2014—a list that provides a good snapshot of topics I regularly cover, such as genetics, chronic pain, medical decision making, parenting, and Christianity. [Read more...]

Not All Pain is Gain


Not all pain is gain. Pain is not always fixable. This is the truth. But it is not a hopeless truth. [Read more...]

No Easy Choices When It Comes to Genetics, Disability, and Reproductive Decisions

book cover

TIME Magazine online picked up my post from earlier this week on whether a parent might regret bearing a child who inherits a difficult, painful genetic disorder. (TIME.com has a cooperative agreement with Patheos that allows them to select several Patheos posts every week for publication on their site.) The post is being shared widely, by [Read More...]

Can You Regret Having a Child Who Inherits Your Genetic Baggage?

Photo courtesy of Speak Up/Gerry Green

But while I sometimes wish I could have spared my daughter her genetic fate, I’m also profoundly grateful that it was not in my power to decide what kind of kid I would get. [Read more...]

A Letter to My 16-Year-Old Self

To my 16-year-old self: When people tell you that your scars are a kind of beauty mark, that they don’t even notice your physical impairments any more, that you are beautiful and loved, believe them. Believe them the first time they say these things, and every time after. [Read more...]

“Inspiration Porn” Objectifies People with Disabilities

Admire me for what I do—for writing well or raising decent kids or having a lovely garden. But don’t admire me just for existing, just because I live a mostly unremarkable life with scars and a limp and a history of dozens of broken bones. [Read more...]

A Broken Body, Redeemed

Eight years ago, when my three children were still very young, we traveled to Omaha for an Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) Foundation conference. Both I and my oldest daughter have OI, a genetic collagen disorder that causes brittle bones, short stature, and other symptoms. As we were checking in at the conference hotel, I glanced up [Read More...]