Kathy Shaidle’s Poetry, Old and New

So I took part in this year-end books roundup with AmCon, and once again told everybody to read Kathy Shaidle's 1998 poetry collection, Lobotomy Magnificat. You can get a longer review from me here but really, it's a short book, why not throw it in your basket?Shaidle replied; I thought this bit was esp interesting: "A lot of people see 'compassion' in my poetry and other early writing that I simply don’t think is there. I think they’re seeing what they want to see."She also noted that he … [Read more...]

Kathy Shaidle, “Dream of the Rood”

Blessed be my branches’ shadows, sunsewn Mosesbaskets: they ‘byed the Infant sleeping on the grass.Blessed be my roots: weaving the Boy a fine cradle, they hovered Him just above Hell.Yes, bring on the beautiful saw— I will it. Dead I will live forever.Today my stillborn children sleep between a billion breasts, & crusade-shattered splinters— downed like so much autumn fruit— doze glass-beneath from Rome & back againand He is risen. He, Carpenter’s Son. I, Nativ … [Read more...]

“Will Work for Meaning”: I review “Two Days, One Night”

at AmCon: The most tense scene I saw in any movie this year was Marion Cotillard leaning against a blank wall gulping from a bottle of water.Cotillard is playing Sandra in “Two Days, One Night,” yet another must-see from Belgium’s Dardenne brothers (“The Kid with a Bike,” “Rosetta,” “The Child,” “The Son”). Sandra is waiting for the results of a vote taken by the employees of Solwal, the company where she used to work. When the movie opens she has barely, partially overcome a severe depressi … [Read more...]

An Amazing Exchange from the Deleted Scenes of “Damsels in Distress”

ROSE: One thought reassures me: Our stupidity must be part of God’s divine plan. He must have made us stupid for a reason.VIOLET: Because he wants us to have kids? Be fruitful and multiply…ROSE: Yes. Probably. via … [Read more...]

A Couple Best-Of Lists from Wesley Hill and Helen Andrews

Hill: ...I write often about the consolations of friendship, hospitality, and Christian community, but sometimes I wonder if I’m too sanguine, writing as if these were easily attainable and capable of straightforward engineering. These three books, in very different ways, puncture my naivety. more!Andrews: ...Any culture that bestows fame on fiery young radicals will see some of them punished with remorse in old age, but there are surprisingly few role models for writers who find t … [Read more...]

Tenderness, Penitence and Estrangement: I Review the El Greco Show at the National Gallery of Art

for the Weekly Standard:The nickname “El Greco” reveals two things about Doménikos Theotokópoulos, the weird and sublime painter of the Counter-Reformation: He was Greek, and he was a stranger. When everybody around you is Greek, nobody is “the Greek.” El Greco’s vision reflected the second part of his identity even more than the first.more … [Read more...]

“How Should Secular People Approach Sacred Art?”: The Best Essay of Its Kind

I've read a ton of these and Pelagia Horgan's appreciation of Fra Angelico is the best by far. Give it time to build: The loveliest image I know is Fra Angelico’s ‘Entry of the Blessed into Paradise’, a scene from his painting The Last Judgment of 1431. In it, the blessed, just risen from their graves, gather together in a flowering garden to join hands with angels and dance into the light of heaven. There’s a scene in D H Lawrence’s novel The Rainbow (1915) when Anna Brangwen sees a copy of the … [Read more...]


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