Today’s Saint: John of God

Patron of the sick. Here's a painting by Murillo:and here's the obvious Shane McGowan contribution: … [Read more...]

Dinosaurs and Cherry Blossoms: The Art of Patrick Haemmerlein

The Level Ground film festival (of which much more soon!) also put together low-key art shows, by choosing the art which decorated the various spaces where we did our book readings and movie panels. The standout for me was Patrick Haemmerlein, especially his collage series: inky, high-contrast trees with scarlet blossoms, in a patchwork canvas with yellowing newspaper and other scrapbook clippings. Sometimes these severe yet cheerful trees would be accompanied by birds, or even a T-Rex, although … [Read more...]

“Art Breakers”: I’m in The American Interest

reviewing: The first chamber sets up the thesis of “Damage Control: Art and Destruction Since 1950,” at the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington through May 26. As visitors enter, a 1950s filmstrip plays, showing nuclear blasts recorded for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. To one side, so you only see it once you’re already in the room, there’s a smashed baby grand piano with an axe still sticking out of its body: the remains of a 2013 performance art piece in which Raphael Montañez Ortiz hacked the … [Read more...]

Treebisons, Brickchildren

Some really striking, lovely, vivid sculpture from Ellen Jewett[image removed but it's great, trust me]more! there are rats!and Brad Spencer[likewise]more!Via Matt Jones and Wesley Hill respectively. … [Read more...]

“Rich Dad, Poor Dad”: I review new film about fatherhood

for AmSpec: Hirokazu Koreeda's new film, Like Father, Like Son, pretends that it will be up front about the source of its heartbreak. Koreeda is the tragedian behind 2004's Nobody Knows, based on the real-life horror of several small children abandoned in their Tokyo apartment after their mother disappeared. This time he takes a parental perspective: Like Fatheropens with a couple learning that their only child was switched at birth, and is not biologically related to them.There's a … [Read more...]

“Flying Camels, Butterflies, And Twizzles”: I report from US Nationals

for AmSpec. (Which Nationals? you ask. Men's figure skating obviously. There is only one sport.)In early January, I attend my very first professional sports competition. The U.S. National Figure Skating Championships have already been going on for four days; the event sprawls over four disciplines and five age categories. I’m at Boston’s TD Garden to watch the senior men, including the two men we’ll be sending to the Winter Olympics in Sochi.Sport, like art, uses the limited body to hint … [Read more...]

Goldfinch and Lyre Bird

I just re-read The Liar, Stephen Fry's 1991 debut novel, and it's still the funniest thing I've ever read. The antihero, Adrian Healey, careens through life plagiarizing, dissembling, cheating at cricket, and camouflaging his deepest emotions. He's terrified of getting caught (at what? at everything), and fears/hopes that the whole world is just a giant set-up to expose him.It's a heartbreaking book in its own way, scathing but poignant. Adrian's vulnerability comes through from the very … [Read more...]


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