From Erich Kastner, “Going to the Dogs: The Story of a Moralist”

tr. Cyrus Brooks: Rather against his will, Fabian was allowing Malmy to enlighten him on the subject of short-term loans. "The whole country, politically and economically, is falling more and more into the hands of foreigners," he maintained. "A pin prick and the whole thing will blow up. If once the money is recalled in large quantities, we shall all go broke--the banks, the municipalities, the joint-stock companies, and the Reich.""But you never put that in the paper," said Irrgang."I … [Read more...]

“Every Day Is Like Sunday: Rediscovering Wilfrid Sheed’s ‘The Hack’”

Me at AmCon: Don’t call Wilfrid Sheed’s 1963 The Hack a forgotten Catholic classic. I don’t want it to be dismissed so easily.Sheed was the scion of Frank Sheed and Maisie Ward, the Catholic publishers and apologists; he knew that pre-Vatican II world of professional religion from the inside. The Hack is a satirical tragedy about Bert Flax, a man who supports his wife and five children by writing pabulum for the lower levels of the Catholic press: angels with cotton-candy wings, Irish … [Read more...]

Five Things for Thursday

What I've been reading."Why Young Sexual Assault Victims Tell Incoherent Stories." When my alarmed parents sat me down to draw out every detail of what had happened, trying to construct a timeline and zeroing in on specific actions and body parts, I was terrified by their seriousness. The conversation was such an important one that we had it sitting right where we were when my sister brought up the subject: on the stairs. It’s hard to give an accurate account of something when you’re under t … [Read more...]

Radley Balko Helms New Washington Post Criminal Justice Blog

This is the John L. Allen, Jr. of criminal justice old-media coups. He starts out with an introduction (so fi you've ever wondered why I keep plugging this guy, here you go), four myths about criminal justice, and notes on some recurring themes: Another recurring theme you’ll also find here is the problem with the way incentives are structured within the criminal justice system. From cops, to prosecutors, to judges, to the effects of our criminal laws themselves, we too often encourage and r … [Read more...]

“18th Century Fox”: Helen Rittelmeyer Is Hilarious

in AmSpec, on Burke-era popular conservatism: TWO THINGS ALL  conservatives love are narratives of decline and talking about conservatism. Put those together and you have the popular argument that conservatism ain’t what it used to be. The chart of that supposed decline, if you were to draw it Ascent of Man style, would start with Edmund Burke looking intelligent and walking upright, followed by William F. Buckley as Australopithecus, slouching. The present age would be represented by some knuc … [Read more...]

“Serious Christians Should Abstain From”… Thing I Totally Did

Pascal-Emmanuel Gobry makes a very good point: Remember when Pope Francis gave that interview? And he said something heretical-sounding? And all orthodox Christians blew a fuse? And it turned out the interview wasn’t proofread and Francis never said that? moreIn fact I'd been wondering whether I should add a note to this post, since the one place where I got up on my hind feet and took a swipe at Pope Francis was in fact a paraphrase/distortion. I decided not to, but PEG made me rethink t … [Read more...]

“Hounding Whistleblowers Is Wrong”: David Cay Johnston

in Newsweek:...I think Keller, my former boss, missed the underlying issue: Why assume that leakers must risk all? Why assume leakers must be prosecuted? My Newsweek piece noted that the British Official Secrets Act included a "public interest" defense for whistleblowers, until Parliament cut it from the law in 1989. The U.S. should enact a public interest defense. Leakers could still face prosecution, but they could try to persuade a jury that their acts were justified in defense of the … [Read more...]


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