“Sociology as Class War”: I’m at AmCon

asking why progressives keep greasing the camel: I just finished Andrew Cherlin’s new book, Labor’s Love Lost: The Rise and Fall of the Working-Class Family in America. It’s a solid piece of historically-informed synthesis.But it’s also full of examples of my least-favorite feature of contemporary sociology of the family. Because almost all writing that gets labeled “sociology” is done by members of the overeducated elite, the values common among that elite are taken for granted and treated … [Read more...]

The Carceral State: Dept of Things That Aren’t Solutions

Three links. Happy New Year!Not a solution: police body cameras: ...Despite the push for body cameras by policymakers and politicians, many organizers (both in New York and around the country) are not entirely convinced that body cameras are a meaningful reform—especially after Daniel Pantaleo was not indicted for killing Eric Garner on camera.Andrew Padilla is disturbed “that all this energy towards accountability…can be flipped into increased surveillance in communities of color and in … [Read more...]

Does Working-Class Marriage Need More Progressivism?

Ross Douthat lays out the question:Many optimistic liberals believe not only that such imitation is possible, but that what needs to be imitated most are the most socially progressive elements of the new upper class’s way of life: delayed marriage preceded by romantic experimentation, more-interchangeable roles for men and women in breadwinning and child rearing, a more emotionally open and egalitarian approach to marriage and parenting. The core idea here is that working-class men, in p … [Read more...]

“The Prize of the Defeated”: Matthew Walther on Don Colacho

click: Nicolás Gómez-Dávila’s name is not one to conjure with on these shores or, probably, any others. His work, almost exclusively collections of short—indeed one- or two-sentence—compositions, was long available only in limited editions from small presses in his native Colombia, and even then only because his family and friends urged him to publish. Translations, especially into German, have made him a cult figure in Europe, but in the United States, where he has never appeared in any publish … [Read more...]

“Discipline Is Not So Much a Social Necessity as an Aesthetic Obligation”

Any article bringing more attention to Don Colacho is an article I want you to read: ...If conservatives are characterized by nostalgia, reactionaries are characterized by decadence. Conservatives build networks and speak in sound bites; reactionaries build mausoleums and speak in epitaphs. Reactionaries are aesthetic rather than practical thinkers. They play alongside, if not across, the border of tragedy and fatalism. Civil debate is meaningless to the side that has already lost. more … [Read more...]

Gouging the Families of Prisoners; and “The Janitors of Good Wishes”

a post with lots to say about political praxis as well as, you know, gouging the families of prisoners: ...There is a salutary purpose to be served by people like Henson, who believe that good government can offer valuable solutions to vexing problems.  The positive wishes for new ideas provide a force that drives innovations that do, in many instances, make things better than they were before.  Even if they don’t turn out perfectly, or as well as hoped, they can be surprisingly better.  Wheth … [Read more...]

Do They Know It’s Halloween?: Cracked Feels My Pain

about the decline of trick-or-treating:#1. Traditional Trick-or-Treating Is Dying The first year I lived in California, we had a huge Halloween turnout at our house. So many costumed children showed up that we actually ran out of candy, and I had to run out to the store still dressed as Princess Buttercup and fight a sailor for the last bag of Laffy Taffy. The next year, thinking we'd be prepared, we stocked up on candy early and ... maybe one-third of the kids showed up. See, the … [Read more...]


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