Around the Blogosphere

Indiana made the front page of the New York Times today. It is a good day in the world when a Midwest state’s voter ID law makes the front page, I presume. That requiring people to show that they are who they say they are, when it doesn’t cost them anything, should have to go before the Supreme Court seems a waste of taxpayers’ money. Then again, one has to deal with the BMV to get a free ID, and so perhaps that could be challenged as a form of cruel and unusual punishment…

Elsewhere on the web, John Pieret continues to follow what is going on with Expelled. The Panda’s Thumb points to a blog entry on the constitutionality of curricula and also to a conservative commentator’s critique of Expelled and the fundamental dishonesty of creationism (Henry Neufeld mentions this last one too). See also Science Avenger and Open Parachute.

ERV apparently had the same sort of experience that Jim West had, although in this case it was perhaps a malicious complaint rather than hacking. I’d recommend that anyone with a Blogger blog make a backup copy. Use a program like Offline Explorer. Then go welcome ERV to its new location.

A student of mine has posted a book review of Robert Jewett’s Christian Tolerance: Paul’s Message to the Modern Church.

IO9 suggests we might survive the next apocalypse, since we survived the last one.

Think Christian wonders what you make of the Rapture Index. I think it proves that it isn’t just in science that fundamentalist Christianity’s reality is so ridiculous that it is hard to parody. I say this as someone who would once upon a time have taken the rapture index very seriously. Then I actually read Revelation carefully, and when I finally paid attention to the tenses in Revelation 17:10, it was clear that my futurist interpretation didn’t square with the text itself.

Find and Ye Shall Seek compares two Canadian progressive Christians: Bruce Sanguin and Gretta Vosper. Sean the Baptist draws attention to a site with the writings of radical Christians.

Ruth Gledhill shared a video on talking to children about God, as well as a piece of cat and mouse humor.

If you are planning to buy a Greek reader, visit Archaic Christianity first.

Scotteriology gives theologians’ answers to the age-old question: “Why did the chicken cross the road?”