Doubly Ruined By Fundamentalism

Commenter Brian said something that I thought deserved to be repeated. The original quote can be found in a comment here, but I’ll paraphrase slightly so that it makes better sense on its own:

“This is why I dislike fundamentalism so much: it ruins the person both while they profess fundamentalist ideology and when they leave it.”

  • http://blog.echurchwebsites.org.uk/ Stuart

    It nearly ruined me as my fundamentalism collapsed, but has now become the making of the new me.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/12617299120618867829 Angie Van De Merwe

    Stuart, and James,I think that fundamentalism is like living in a box or bubble, that doesn't connect to the real world. Those that are within the box feel safe and secure from all alarm. Fears are relieved, anxieties quieted, because of such "promises" of "the Bible" and "God's faithfulness". But, it is not psychological wholeness, far from it. It relieves, but doesn't heal, except for the time one clings to that worldview.So, yes, fundamentalism ruins the person because of their hypervigilence over imagined evils and narrowed vision of all that is. But, the only people who can say that it ruins people after they leave fundamentalism are those that have designs on the person. And those are possibly the "liberal christian' or "atheist". Their vision is no less confining in some ways, as these want social activism for the poor, re-distribution of wealth and some would go so far as the dissolution of the nation=state. All in the "name of God", of course!

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/10828225180668865911 Mystical Seeker

    That is a profound insight. Speaking as an ex-fundamentalist, I can attest to the fact that it is true. You can never fully escape the shadow of your fundamentalist upbringing, no matter how hard you try.


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