Practical, Progressive and Problematic Christianity around the Blogosphere

Diglotting discusses the “Tweet Your Creed Meme” and proposes the Golden Rule. Daniel Manastireanu has a sermon that does something similar, asking what single verse encapsulates his life philosophy, and proposes Micah 6:8: “Do justice, love kindness and walk humbly with your God.”

Like A Child asks for testimonies about how people who embrace evolution and reject Biblical inerrancy have managed to preserve Christian faith.

Hemant Mehta shares a statistic that 13% of American school teachers of science advocate creationism.

Jerry Coyne met with a group of liberal Christians, seemingly for the first time. John Pieret thinks it is about time.

Jen McCreight shares this video of Ken Ham seeking to defend the Noah’s Ark Theme Park as worthy of state support.

And Irtiqa shares a clip of Bill Maher discussing climate change with some politicians, and in the process Congressman Jack Kingston’s stance on evolution (which he doesn’t understand) becomes apparent as well.
http://embed.crooksandliars.com/v/MTk1MzEtNDM2MDM

  • Anonymous

    I reject inerrancy first of all because it is undefensible and two, because by doing so I can appreciate the multiple opinions the authors of the bible express on their own grounds rather than forcing them to agree to a single doctrine. Thom Stark's book on the subject is the best that I know of. I also accept evolution because it expresses the themes in Genesis in a new and refreshing way. It's also because the evidence for it is staggering and because of that I need to modify my understanding of the biblical account. Brian

  • Anonymous

    This is why I have a hard time holding people with a strong Southern accent in high esteem intellectually. Also, the only theme that could be expressed differently in Genesis is that God created man. Pretty much every other detail about how he did so is irreconcilable with evolution.

  • Anonymous

    I said themes my dear friend not details. Genesis shows what it is to be human and ect. Evolution can show the true freedom we had in becoming who we are. Though perhaps this is too bit of a romanticist understanding of the theory.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/12478038936820787129 Landon Hedrick

    "I don't believe that a creature crawled out of the sea and became a human being one day."I guess I never thought about it like that before… Hmmm… Yes, evolution is a myth after all! BOOM! Falsified!

  • http://scotteriology.wordpress.com/ Scott Bailey

    "I don't believe that a creature crawled out of the sea and became a human being one day."Anti-intellectualism in a nutshell, "I believe. I don't believe." However, that is always at a hypothetical level. Science on the other hand tests, gets data, and then attempts to construct a theory that explains the natural phenomena.In my opinion, it is the number one misunderstanding of many evolution deniers. They mistake hypothesis and theory, knowledge and belief as the same thing. From this mistake they try to keep the entire discussion in the philosophical realm, "I believe. I don't believe…" They refuse to understand that methodological naturalism functions entirely different.Oh, and Ken Hamm is one of the most duplicitous disingenuous people on the planet. There's hardly anything too insignificant for him to try and misrepresent. (as you have personal experience of!)


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