The First Occupy Wall Street?

When I shared images suggesting that Jesus might have been a liberal Jew or Jewish liberal, it generated interesting discussion. So I thought I would share these and see what people think of them:

I toyed with titling this post The First “Occupy David Street” because that is one famous shopping street in modern-day old Jerusalem. But I suspect that “Occupy Wall Street” works every bit as well, since if there were people engaging in commerce in or near to the outer court of the temple, it was surely not far from a wall.

Be that as it may, Jesus certainly was not the first to engage in a prophetic critique of profit-making. And indeed, it is debated whether the so-called “temple tantrum” was about protesting making money off of pilgrims, or a symbolic act portending the temple's destruction, or something else.

What do you think Jesus' act of driving moneychangers and sellers of animals out of the temple was intended to achieve or convey?

 

  • Dr. David Tee

    “What do you think Jesus’ act of driving moneychangers and sellers of animals out of the temple was intended to achieve or convey? ”
    Why don’t you read the passage and find out. Luke 19:45-46
    Why try to equate modern sinful rebellion with divine sinless acts????

    • http://www.patheos.com/blogs/exploringourmatrix/ James F. McGrath

      It is interesting to note that you treat any Gospel, early or late, as worth citing even when the question is a historical one, and bring in notions irrelevant to and inappropriate to historical discussions. And you don’t understand why you aren’t able to communicate effectively to people who don’t already agree with you…

      Whether any of the Gospels accurately convey the meaning of the action as intended by Jesus is a matter of debate, particularly because the Synoptic Gospels separate out from that event – and try to distance Jesus from or change the wording of – the saying about the temple being destroyed and rebuilt in three days. And so historians have good reason to ask critical questions about the Gospels here.

      • Dr. David Tee

        Thanks for proving John 5:47ff correct.
        It is not a historical question that you posed, it was an exercise in stupidity. Occupy Wall Street is not justified anywhere in scripture and to equate rebellion with Jesus’ cleansing of the temple out of righteous anger is absurd.
        Scripture is never irrelevant and history needs the light just as much as sinners do.
        Your unbelief knows no bounds and shows that following alternatives to God’s word leads you astray not to the truth.

        • Dr. David Tee

          P.S. “Be that as it may, Jesus certainly was not the first to engage in a prophetic critique of profit-making. And indeed, it is debated whether the so-called “temple tantrum” was about protesting making money off of pilgrims, or a symbolic act portending the temple’s destruction, or something else”
          This whole paragraph demonstrates that you do not know scripture at all or what it means and it also shows that you are leading people away from the truth, wasting everybody’s time.

  • http://www.facebook.com/vicky.chase.98 Vicky Chase

    I
    believe that the Jewish followers of Jesus wanted social justice for
    the world. I have discovered a new book that shows how this social
    justice message was covered up by His Gentile followers. The church
    has blinkered its past. It’s no secret that Jesus strove to bring in
    the kingdom of justice here on earth and his followers implemented it
    in the communal society we read about in Acts 2:44-47. The church’s
    dirty secret is that the Jewish followers of Jesus continued to hold
    his vision dear, later influencing such sects as the Bogomils and
    even, according to their own oral traditions, the Doukhobors. After
    exterminating the Jewish followers of Jesus, the church’s
    historians buried this history of justice-seeking but an author by
    the name of Lawrence Goudge has exhumed their story and presented it
    in ‘Cover-Up:
    How the Church Silenced Jesus’s True Heirs.’
    This book does the world a great service by illuminating for the
    first time this vital part of the history of social justice. I found
    it at http://tinyurl.com/69cazll.

    • Susan Burns

      I agree social justice was the goal of the Nazarenes. It seems to me from what evidence I have found that Jesus was a Tsadik. In some afro-asiatic languages tsadic means “pillar” and in some it means “justice”. The numeric equivalent is 36 which is Lamed and vav. Supposedly, there must be 36 rightous individuals to hold the world aloft or God would destroy the world and start all over. Perhaps LV (lamed vav) is heart? Leviathan? Tribe of levi? Love? Does anyone have any ideas? I have read it means “attachment”. Perhaps the “attachment” is describing the condition of the dolman before it is cut from the earth? This pillar cult must be very ancient because megaliths are found in many places all around the world.

    • Dr. David Tee

      You do not know what you are talking about and you and Susan prove paul correct when he said women should learn in silence and not teach men.

      • Susan Burns

        I think the word I was looking for is “aleph” symbolized by the horned head of an ox. The Molten Sea in the Temple complex was held “aloft” by the heads of horned oxen. Since the Molten Sea was filled with water, the horned oxen needed to be perfectly level and balanced.

  • Keith Akers

    Jesus was disrupting the animal sacrifice business in the temple. In none of the four canonical gospels are the money changers at the top of the list; in Luke they are not even mentioned. The Ebionite gospel has Jesus say, “I have come to destroy the sacrifices” (see also Recognitions 1.54). The Jewish Christian Ebionites were the true heirs of Jesus’ teaching.


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