Young-Earth Creationism vs. Sodom and Gomorrah

In the Biblical story about Sodom and Gomorrah, Abraham pleads with God to spare the cities even if just a certain minimum number of righteous people are found in it. Eventually he bargains God down to ten. The story then unfolds that, although there aren’t that many righteous people to be found in the city, God’s angels still spare Lot and his family.

I wonder what would happen if God were to declare that judgment was coming on young-earth creationism in a similar fashion. If a modern-day Abraham were to convince God to spare the movement if ten truthful and honest people could be found in it, would the movement be spared, or would fire and brimstone rain down upon it?

The only honest young-earth creationist I can think of is Todd Wood. So let’s call him a modern-day Lot.

Are there others? Could you find ten? Or are all of them willing participants in dishonesty and deception – whether they be full-fledged charlatans like Ken Ham or Kent Hovind, or simply people who’ve bought into the lies of such purveyors of misinformation, when they could easily have fact-checked their claims and seen through them?

If young-earth creationism’s survival depended on finding ten honest adherents to its stance, would it survive or be burned to a cinder?

  • http://coolingtwilight.com/ Dan Wilkinson

    I’ve always thought Kurt Wise was pretty honest, though I’m certainly not familiar with everything he’s said or written.

  • http://www.facebook.com/herman.cummings.12 Herman Cummings

    On the first day, God said “Let there be light”. Why didn’t God say “Let there be a planet of water”? It’s because the water covered planet was already there. Young Earth creationism refuses to face reality and acknowledge this.

    In no way, shape, or form, does Genesis 1:1 explain the origin of the water.
    It is deceitful to try to use verse one as a commencement of “the first day”.

    What happened to the “young Earth” practice of literal interpretation of scripture? They redefine scriptures to make them fit their foolish doctrines!

    Herman Cummings
    ephraim7@aol.com

  • http://www.dregstudios.com Brandt Hardin

    Here in TN, they have taken steps though new legislation to allow creationism back into the classroom. This law turns the clock back nearly 100 years here in the seemingly unprogressive South and is simply embarrassing. There is no argument against the Theory of Evolution other than that of religious doctrine. The Monkey Law only opens the door for fanatic Christianity to creep its way back into our classrooms. You can see my visual response as a Tennessean to this absurd law on my artist’s blog at http://dregstudiosart.blogspot.com/2012/04/pulpit-in-classroom-biblical-agenda-in.html with some evolutionary art and a little bit of simple logic.

  • decathelite

    I think it would depend on whether those ten had daughters with which they could continue their progeny.

  • http://brgulker.wordpress.com/ brgulker

    I think people can be sincere and also ignorant. Saying something you honestly believe to be true but are ignorant about would have to be considered honest I think.

    • dsa

      Good point. Most YECs are acting in good faith, consistent with what they believe.

      • Beau Quilter

        That’s fine, and if YEC’s kept their beliefs to a small community of believers, I’d be less inclined to indict them. But when ignorant beliefs are foisted onto others, then I have no qualms in calling it out. Legal wins against creationism are losing to loopholes such as those being enacted in Louisiana and Tennessee. In many places around the country, science teachers are cowed into “deemphasizing” evolution or ignoring it altogether, simply to avoid complaints from loud YEC’s in the community. Simple ignorance is easily countered with education. But persistent ignorance in the face of all the evidence is tantamount to a lie; and when it threatens the education of our children, it is a danger and an offense.

    • http://www.patheos.com/blogs/exploringourmatrix/ James F. McGrath

      When someone repeats gossip that they heard and assumed was true, would you categorize them as “honest”? They may not be liars in the same sense as those who themselves invent things, but “honest” doesn’t seem fitting.

      • http://brgulker.wordpress.com/ brgulker

        As someone who grew up on Bob Jones curriculum, I have to disagree. I grew up believing evolution was a lie and tried to convince others of that ‘fact.’ I was being honest to the ‘truth’ as I understood it as a 16 year old kid.

        Once I got into public high school, I began the long process of unlearning things that were not accurate. it wasnt until college when i met other Christians who acceoted evolution that I really came to terms wirh it. But I can’t see how anyone could look at my situation as a home school student and conclude dishonesty on my part when I tried to convince ‘worldly’ kids that evolution was a lie.

        Now, the people who wrote that curriculum? Different story obviously

        • http://www.patheos.com/blogs/exploringourmatrix/ James F. McGrath

          Well, as someone who fell for the young-earth scam in his teens as a young Christian, I don’t let myself off the hook for not having had the sense to investigate the claims I heard. If you would prefer to call me gullible or foolish rather than dishonest, so be it. But “honest” doesn’t seem to me fitting, since if I had been sufficiently honest and concerned for truth, I would have checked on the veracity of things I was told.

          • http://brgulker.wordpress.com/ brgulker

            I can’t really speak for you. I was home schooled until 10th grade. I didn’t even understand the scientific method until college. I agree that we should seek truth. But as a high schooler, I didn’t even have the basic tools requisite to begin that search. Biology was like a foreign language. It wasn’t until after college level biology that I even had categories for understanding *how to understand science in the first place.*

            Given my situation, I do let myself off the hook, to use that turn of phrase.

            Now, when it comes to adults like Ken Ham, I applaud you for what you’re writing on your blog. But I don’t think 16year old home schooled me is a very good comparison.