Non-Kosher Comfort

P. Z. Myers shared this bit of nonsense from Ray Comfort:

I’m not sure whether to focus on kosher food laws, or the likelihood that Ray Comfort is intentionally trying to make Christianity look ridiculous by publicly spouting this nonsense. So I’ll just leave it at this, and let you discuss whatever you like in the comments section – since apparently in the absence of a prohibition against whale meet, you can all simply do whatever you like.

  • Jessica Harmon

    Wait. Are eagles and whales not kosher? I thought we didn’t eat them because they’re endangered. Atheists probably still agree it’s bad to over-hunt whales, right? In fact, what does Comfort have against eating whale meat? Shouldn’t he be down with getting rid of those pesky leviathans? (Or does leviathan pluralize like moose? I’m not sure I’ve ever had to talk about more than one.)

    • arcseconds

      Eagles are birds of prey, and whales swim in the waters, and although they have fins, they don’t have scales.

    • arcseconds

      But you’re right. Europe and America had no moral qualms about eating whale until relatively recently.

    • Jack Collins

      Typically, only game animals pluralize like moose and deer, and since only God can draw up Leviathan, it’s not fair game…

  • arcseconds

    O_o

    so much wrongness, so little time.

    I think horse meat has been consumed in Europe since ages past, and lo, Wikipedia tells me that it’s been consumed in Veneto since 500 B.C. at least:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horse_meat#Italy

    Is Ray aware that most Christians do not actually pay any attention to the food restrictions given in the Torah?

    The pope did ban horse meat in the 700s, though, apparently. Good thing someone’s standing up for God’s Menu.

  • David_Evans

    Sorry for stating the obvious, but the fuss over horse meat in “beef”burgers is because someone in the food chain is lying about the source of their meat, and thereby making it impossible to be sure of its safety. A thoroughly secular concern. Even non-theists try to avoid food poisoning.

    • arcseconds

      That wasn’t obvious to me, so thanks for mentioning it.

      I had assumed that the problem was either that there are in fact people in Sweden who object to eating horse, or else that it was simply that people weren’t getting what they were expecting. I didn’t bother looking it up because consumer issues in Sweden simply aren’t very important to me (although of course they are to people in Sweden: even if it was just a labellng issue they still have every right to be complaining about it).

      I hadn’t figured the health line.

      • http://irrco.wordpress.com/ Ian

        When the horse meat scandal hit the UK, specialist horse meat butchers reported an increase in demand, from the reports I read in the newspapers.

        I think many of us who were around in the 90s in the UK are very sensitive when it comes to suggestions that our beef is poorly sourced, badly controlled, and not subject to good safety standards.

        Personally my reaction were a) to be really angry at the processed food industry, b) to be frustrated that, in a country with excellent pastural particularly bovine farming, we’re importing beef from eastern Europe, and c) to find where my nearest horsemeat butcher was to try it out. Alas on point c, there was nobody within easy reach and my horsemeat virginity remains intact.

  • Gary

    Comfort can have a pink slime burger (I’m sure it’s the same as his kids get at the local school cafeteria. But I get to eat his lobster.

  • http://tunabay.com/ Keika

    Since I’m hypersensitive to mercury in food, I avoid eating canned tuna, whale and porpoise because it sparks a frontal lobe cephalalgia, much like trying to understand anything toxic from Mr. Comfort. No comfort in that pun intended.


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