The Importance of Stupidity

I think this applies beyond the realm of the natural sciences. What do others think? [Read more...]

CIC Information Fluency Workshop

I am currently in Baltimore with some colleagues, at a workshop focused on information fluency in the disciplines of religion, philosophy, and the history of ideas. It started yesterday, and has already offered a lot of fascinating perspectives from faculty and librarians, including practical examples and specific online tools that can be used for teaching [Read More...]

Why Go To University if You Don’t Understand What It’s For?

There was an article in my school’s student newspaper, in which a student who wished to remain anonymous, self-identifying only as an accounting major, said that they sneak out early from required cultural events, and that they have never been to one that they enjoyed. I decided to blog about it, but also to submit [Read More...]

How Liberal Scholars are Made

Yuriy Stasyuk shared the image above on Facebook, with a quote from Daniel Wallace. It draws attention to the fact that studying the Bible in a rigorous, academic way, results in people feeling compelled to draw conclusions which conservatives dislike – in many cases, which they themselves dislike, having started out as conservatives. Most liberal Biblical [Read More...]

EasyBib

I asked my students directly about the strange citations and citation formatting in their work, and one volunteered a possible explanation – the website Easybib.com. Now, I tried it out and it did a pretty OK job creating a citation for a post on my blog. And so the issue seems to still be what [Read More...]

Rigor in Online Education

My colleague Jim Keating wrote a piece about online education for the Tomorrow’s Professor eNewsletter. Here is an excerpt. Click through to read the rest. There is a worry that online education is not as rigorous as that which happens in the classroom. When we hear people ask wither a particular online course is sufficiently [Read More...]

What Could a Fisherman Compose?

I shared a link to a blog post by Jonathan Bernier a while back, which questioned the relevance of the purported employment of the traditionally-proposed author of the Fourth Gospel. Here’s a list which someone put together of occupations of tannaitic rabbis: The sages of the Talmud worked at many diverse occupations. For instance, Hillel was [Read More...]

Wonder is the First Step Towards Further Knowledge

“Wonder at the things that are before you, making this the first step to further knowledge” – Jesus, in the Gospel according to Matthias. Quoted by Clement of Alexandria (Miscellanies 2.9.45) The background image is a photograph taken by Chris Murphy.   [Read more...]

Ten Professorial Commandments

Elliott Ratzman offered the following Ten Commandments in Inside Higher Ed: 1. Thou shalt have no other object of attention in the classroom. No devices — phones, gadgets, computers, guns — or distractions; I am a jealous and wrathful instructor. 2. Thou shalt honor thy fellow students. They are also struggling, growing, with opinions always changing, and [Read More...]

Scholarship is a Conversation

The University of Washington libraries has an online LibGuide about research called Research 101. The video above is one of the components. [Read more...]

Weird References in Student Papers

I have seen students do some odd things in their bibliographies with such frequency that I am sure it cannot be a coincidence. But I am not sure where they are getting these practices from. The strangest part is the tendency, when citing online sources, to repeat the title of the article, web page, or [Read More...]


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