History of Labor Day

HT Allan Bevere [Read more...]

Review of Jodi Magness, Stone and Dung, Oil and Spit

I am long overdue to review Jodi Magness’ book Stone and Dung, Oil and Spit: Jewish Daily Life in the Time of Jesus on my blog. It is so full of interesting detail that it simply wouldn’t do to skim through it quickly. Many readers will have encountered at some point a picture book which children [Read More...]

Review of William Dever, The Lives of Ordinary People in Ancient Israel

I mentioned in a recent post that I had been reading William Dever’s book, The Lives of Ordinary People in Ancient Israel: When Archaeology and the Bible Intersect. That book (for which I am grateful to Eerdmans for having sent me a review copy) deserves more than just a mentioning in the context of Gen [Read More...]

Gaming Thiessen Polygons

I am pretty sure I am the only person who has ever brought along William Dever’s book The Lives of Ordinary People in Ancient Israel: When Archaeology and the Bible Intersect to read at Gen Con. There was in fact a good rationale – as I mentioned previously, I have been trying to think of [Read More...]

CFP: Doctor Who and History: A Cultural Perspective

From the Doctor Who and History blog: CALL FOR CHAPTER PROPOSALS: DOCTOR WHO AND HISTORY Deadline for abstracts: 1 September 2015 (contributors will be notified within two weeks of the deadline)  When Sydney Newman created a new family-orientated show for the BBC back in early 1963, he envisioned it as being, in John Reith’s terms, to “educate, [Read More...]

Post Doc Fellowship – Digital Library of the Eastern Mediterranean

Via the Hugoye list: The Harvard Library seeks applicants for a two-year Post Doc Fellowship to develop a prototype for a Digital Library of the Eastern Mediterranean (DLEM). The project focuses on creating a digital archive drawing on materials in international repositories in Egypt, Israel, Palestine, Turkey, the United Kingdom, the United States, and Europe. [Read More...]

From Jesus of Nazareth to Church of Jerusalem

A commenter asked a good question about the geographical shift in early Christianity, from Jesus of Nazareth active primarily in Galilee according to the Synoptic Gospels, to a church whose leaders are based in Jerusalem. One can certainly articulate reasons why a move of this sort would have made sense – Jerusalem was the hub of [Read More...]

The Dark Ages

The above image was left by a commenter on my blog. It reflects a common trope about the “dark ages” which reflects not actual darkness, but modern lack of awareness about developments in science, philosophy, and universities in this period, often under the auspices of and with support from the Church. (Although I doubt it [Read More...]

Eldad Keynan among the Tombs

ASOR recently had an article highlighting the work of my friend Eldad Keynan, who has been surveying tombs in Israel, especially in the Galilee. Urban von Wahlde had an article in Bible History Daily about what kind of stone was most likely placed over the opening of the tomb in which Jesus was buried, according [Read More...]

Myth and Memory

On his blog Genealogy of Religion, Cris Campbell talks about reading Colin Calloway’s book One Vast Winter Count: The Native American West before Lewis and Clark. The crux of the post can be summed up by quoting Campbell: I have no doubt that indigenous oral traditions are remarkable repositories of deep history and ancient knowledge. They are [Read More...]

A Brief Manifesto Against Trains

Hemant Mehta shared the above image, supposedly of a letter to the editor printed in an Indiana newspaper in 1830. I’ve learned to be skeptical of such alleged examples of people complaining about advancing technology and breakneck speeds which, from our perspective, seem slow and simple. Whether it is authentic or not, the fact that [Read More...]