Important Online Sources

The Ancient World Online drew attention to recent open access publications from the Center for Hellenic Studies. These include Albert Lord's classic The Singer of Tales and Averil Cameron's Dialoguing in Late Antiquity. I haven't figured out how to actually access them yet, but hopefully will soon. See also Brice Jones' blog post and Paul [Read More...]

Finding and Remembering Ancestors with Help from the Latter-Day Saints

I used to talk disdainfully about the Mormon practice of baptism for the dead. Taking an obscure reference in one of Paul’s letters and developing it into a doctrine seemed to me very dubious. I’m still not persuaded that the LDS church has understood what Paul was referring to correctly. But I have a new-found [Read More...]

Epic of Gilgamesh Sung in Sumerian

The above video, featuring Peter Pringle singing the Sumerian Epic of Gilgamesh in the original language while playing a replica of an ancient Sumerian instrument is very cool. Below is another video in which he plays a replica of a lyre depicted on a relief in Megiddo in Israel. HT The Cultural Mosaic [Read more...]

Jesus and the Historian’s Craft

Tim O’Neill has posted part 1 and part 2 of an online article which is getting a lot of discussion: “An Atheist Historian Examines the Evidence for Jesus.” He does a really good job not just of explaining what the positive evidence is for there having been a historical Jesus, but why mythicist counterarguments are unpersuasive, [Read More...]

100 Years of Teaching

KDRV News shared the above list of rules for teachers from a hundred years ago, in conjunction with the celebration of the centennary of Ruch School, from which the list comes (HT Shelley Ross). It is interesting to reflect on – the gender assumption about who would teach, the need to get there early to [Read More...]

Barabbas and the Crucified

George Athas blogged last week about the possibility that the remains of the last Hasmonean king, Antigonus II Matthathiah, may have been identified – “discovered” would be the wrong word, since this is not a recent discovery, but a reconsideration of an earlier find, the study of which seems to have confronted unfortunate mishaps and [Read More...]

3D Ziggurat Modeling

Via All Mesopotamia, I discovered that someone did 3D modeling of a ziggurat. Below is a sample. Click through to see more. [Read more...]

Komarnitsky Doubting Jesus’ Resurrection (Second Edition)

I have been meaning to post about the second edition of an interesting book by Kris Komarnitsky, Doubting Jesus’ Resurrection: What Happened in the Black Box?, exploring what natural explanation is possible for the rise of Christian belief in the resurrection. I’m kind of glad I waited, because now I can also point to Richard [Read More...]

Egregious Misuse of Archaeology

Yesterday I became aware of an article that illustrates the dubious way Biblical inerrantists use (and that is the appropriate word, rather than something like “engage in”) archaeology. It included this: Peterson supports conservative Christians getting involved in archaeology in order to use archaeology as a way to prove the Bible historically. “We interpret the [Read More...]

New Testament Transcripts Prototype

AWOL shared a link to the New Testament Transcripts Prototype of the University of Munster Institute for New Testament Textual Research. If you aren’t already following AWOL – Ancient World Online – then you should be. It highlights fascinating online open access resources, such as the one mentioned above, or the Max Planck Institute for [Read More...]

Excellent Historical Fiction or Poor History?

Richard Carrier’s talk about the Acts of the Apostles seems to slip back and forth between two claims. One is that the work is historical fiction. The other is that it is trying to be history but failing. The actual evidence complicates this claim. Carrier mentions Colin Hemer’s classic study of Acts, Book of Acts [Read More...]


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