Is Jesus’ Wife Turning Into Thomas?

Discussion of the Gospel of Jesus’ Wife continues full speed ahead on scholarly blogs, and on list-servs such as that dedicated to the Gospel of Thomas. All of this is fantastic to see.  There have been ongoing discussions about open access to scholarly publications. But I think it is also wonderful when not merely the fruits [Read More...]

Blogging BibleWorks 9, Part 1

I’ve decided that the best way to review and illustrate the capabilities of the BibleWorks 9 software is to blog my way through using it for various purposes, taking screenshots along the way. Today I will blog about one example, an investigation of the lexical meaning and history of interpretation of a particular term. I [Read More...]

Lexicity

Thanks to Charles Jones for pointing out on the AWOL blog a great web site collecting links to useful resources related to ancient languages such as Aramaic, Syriac, Amharic/Ethiopic, Coptic, and more. It is called Lexicity. [Read more...]

Blogging BibleWorks 9: Introduction

I am grateful to have been given the opportunity to do a blog review of the most recent version of the famous BibleWorks software, BibleWorks 9. This post will offer just a few introductory remarks about the initial experience of installation and first impressions. I will then go on to blog about specific features and [Read More...]

Melammu, the Mandaeans and other Mesopotamians

Charles Jones posted at Ancient World Online about the Melammu project, which has a digital library dedicated to “The Intellectual Heritage of Assyria and Babylonia in East and West.” The site contains numerous interesting pieces, but not surprisingly the one that grabbed my attention was Amar Annus’ “Some Otherworldly Journeys in Mesopotamian, Jewish, Mandaean and [Read More...]

Responding to Richard Carrier’s Response to Bart Ehrman

I linked previously to Bart Ehrman’s piece on whether Jesus existed in The Huffington Post. A response has been written by Richard Carrier (also discussed by Tom Verenna and Neil Godfrey), and I want here to point out some problems with that response. Let me begin by emphasizing that when scholars write op-ed pieces for [Read More...]

Matthew Morgenstern reviews Charles Häberl’s The Neo-Mandaic Dialect of Khorramshahr

Here’s the conclusion from a review of the book The Neo-Mandaic Dialect of Khorramshahr by my co-worker on the Mandaean Book of John translation project, Charles Häberl: In summary, we have before us an outstanding contribution to the study of one of the rarest Semitic languages spoken today. Häberl is to be thanked for having [Read More...]

Translating (Away) The Son of God

I’ve been meaning for some time to come back to a topic that has been garnering attention, the news that some Bible translations aimed at predominantly Islamic contexts were not using the phrase “son of God”, ever since I circulated an online article mentioning the news and was met with expressions of concern because that [Read More...]

Yahia Yuhana: How Do You Translate a Name and its Translation?

The characteristic introduction in the sections of the Mandaean Book of John focused on John the Baptist (pictured above from Lidzbarski’s edition) reads “Yahia teaches in the nights, Yuhana in the evenings of the nights…” In the translation above, I’ve merely transliterated the names used. But what we have in the text is synonymous parallelism, [Read More...]

The “Original Aramaic Lord’s Prayer” is None of the Above

After it came up on this blog a while back, I’ve wanted to return to the topic of the “Original Aramaic Lord’s Prayer.” Why? Because the thing that can be found online referred to in this way is not original, not Aramaic, not a translation, and not the Lord’s Prayer. Let me elaborate further. This [Read More...]

A Comprehensive Bibliography on Syriac Christianity

Via NASCAS I learned that a trial version of the “Comprehensive Bibliography on Syriac Christianity” is now available online. [Read more...]


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X