Quote of the Day (Robert T. Weston)

Cherish your doubts, for doubt is the attendant of truth. Doubt is the key to the door of knowledge; it is the servant of discovery. A belief which may not be questioned binds us to error, for there is incompleteness and imperfection in every belief. Doubt is the touchstone of truth; it is an acid [Read More...]

Don’t Worship a God that isn’t as Loving as You Are

In my freshmen seminar class “Faith, Doubt, and Reason,” we discussed the problem of evil, with the classic statement that (1) divine omnipotence, (2) perfect divine goodness/justice, and (3) the reality of evil are incompatible. Before exploring other possibilities which try to preserve all three, I asked students which they would remove if they had [Read More...]

Mythicism, Creationism, Science and Faith

Where do mythicism, young-earth creationism, mainstream biology and mainstream historical study (including but not limited to the study of the historical Jesus) fit in the diagram below, in the view of readers of this blog? Even though one cannot run “history experiments,” are historians not doing something similar when they take their ideas about the [Read More...]

All Worldviews Have Holes

First, a quote, and then some reflections on it: Sincere seekers are often painfully aware of holes in their current philosophies — and every worldview that pretends to answer every important question does indeed have holes somewhere because it’s overreaching. So a worldview that seems to fill the irritating holes in a previously held philosophy [Read More...]

Saying Grace

Of Christian prayers, those related to food can be the most theologically problematic. I remember hearing a missionary speak about how others in her mission team had become ill and she had not, and she attributed it to her “praying over her food” – as though (1) her Christian co-workers did not, (2) prayer effectively [Read More...]

Quote of the Day (Ludwig Wittgenstein)

“Death is not an event in life: we do not live to experience death. If we take eternity to mean not infinite temporal duration but timelessness, then eternal life belongs to those who live in the present. Our life has no end in the way in which our visual field has no limits.” — Wittgenstein, [Read More...]

Readiness to Revise

There are two great cartoons that appeared on David Hayward’s blog recently which can be related to one another. Here is the first: And this second one seems to be related to the same theme inasmuch as such experiences can and should motivate theological reflection and revision, as they did in Job’s case:     [Read more...]

Review of More Than Matter by Keith Ward

Keith Ward is an author for whom I have a great appreciation. His book What the Bible Really Teaches was and is enormously important to me in helping me become comfortable in my identity as a Liberal Christian. I am thus always eager to read his latest book. But I admit to feeling some trepidation [Read More...]

Is the Puddle Half Smart or Half Stupid?

Two posts commenting on the same image with a quote from Douglas Adams from very different perspectives seemed worth sharing and commenting on in turn. First, here’s the image: On the one hand, the point about apparent fine-tuning (emphasized at Open Parachute) is a good one. Regarding the universe’s suitability to the existence of ourselves [Read More...]

Doctor Who: Dragonfire

The Doctor Who episode “Dragonfire” is probably the first Sylvester McCoy episode I saw – at least, it is one of the few that I remembered distinctly (if not entirely accurately). The episode introduces Ace and says farewell to Mel as the Doctor’s companion. The amusing premise is that a criminal names Kane has been [Read More...]

If You Don’t Talk To Your Kids About Philosophy, Who Will?

From Philosophy News via Marc Cortez [Read more...]


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