SBL Seminar Papers Online

Ancient World Online noted recently that a number of SBL Seminar Papers going back more than a decade have been made available online in pdf form. Mike Heiser mentioned this as well, sharing a list of some that he downloaded, and another rounding up papers on 1 Enoch. [Read more...]

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SBL Call For Papers: Deadline Approaching

Dear Colleague: The 2013 SBL Annual Meeting Call for Papers closes at Thursday, February 28 at 11:59:59 PM Eastern Standard Time. Program units then review proposals and issue acceptance/rejection notices in March (by April 1). Please note that you will need the following in order to submit a paper proposal: • Current SBL Full or [Read More...]

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Quality on the Internet

Chris Spinks linked to and commented on a Lifehacker article by Alan Henry with the title “How to Conduct Scientific Research On the Internet (Without Getting Duped).” Michael Patton blogged about finding trustworthy scholars. Jona Lendering has a post about what the future might look like if the tide of poor quality information and simple [Read More...]

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SBL Blogger and Online Publication Call for Papers

As I will be taking over as chair of the Blogger and Online Publication Society of Biblical Literature program unit, let me highlight this year’s call for papers. There have been a lot of ways in which blogging has impacted the scholarly realm in recent years, and vice versa. Lots of them deserve to be [Read More...]

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Your Conference Presentation

From Piled Higher and Deeper. Is there anyone who can't relate to this?   [Read more...]

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Conservative Evangelicalism and Academic Freedom

In a blog post today, Pete Enns asked whether an Evangelical institution of higher education can be truly academic and committed to academic freedom. It is an issue that has been garnering a lot of attention, particularly in connection with the administration at Emmanuel Seminary's effort to get Christopher Rollston to leave – a situation [Read More...]

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A Mythicist Salm of Lament

Some mythicists might consider it a major achievement that Rene Salm got invited to speak at the Society of Biblical Literature meeting this year. They would do well to keep in mind that Simcha Jacobovici was also invited to be on the program. But more seriously, the only people who get really excited to be [Read More...]

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SBL 2013 CFP

We’re still recovering from this year’s Society of Biblical Literature conference. But the call for papers for next year is already on the SBL website. So as soon as you’re ready to, you can start thinking about Baltimore 2013! HT Joel Watts [Read more...]

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Mythicist vs. Short Smiling Scholar

It has been a while since I have blogged about mythicism. But several mythicism-related blog posts have appeared over the past day or so. I will start with the most entertaining. Rene Salm managed to get a paper accepted at SBL, and not only has he shared his paper online, but at the blog Vridar [Read More...]

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Mos Eisley #SBLAAR 2012 Annual Meeting

An article in the New York Times today compared the recent joint annual meeting of the American Academy of Religion and the Society of Biblical Literature to the Mos Eisley Cantina. And that is a moment at the intersection of religion and science fiction that I couldn’t allow to pass unmentioned! Brian Le Port offered [Read More...]

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The Resurrection in Eastern Iconography

John Dominic Crossan’s presidential address at SBL was incredibly interesting, and made fantastic use of technology to explore key elements in Eastern iconography depicting the resurrection – and that is what it is consistently referred to in ancient times, “the resurrection” (ἡ ἀνάστασις) and not “the resurrection of Christ.” The event is consistently corporate rather [Read More...]

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