#SBLAAR 2012 Gathering of Bibliobloggers and Other Religion Bloggers: Sunday November 18th at 7pm

The votes are in, the election ended, and the bibliobloggers have spoken! The gathering of bibliobloggers – and I am going to once again invite any theobloggers and other bloggers about religion as well – will be Sunday, November 18th, at 7pm at Kitty O’Shea’s, an Irish pub located at the Hilton in Chicago. The [Read More...]

Around the Blogosphere: The Varieties of Fundamentalisms

Here’s a round-up of some blogging on several topics of longstanding interest: Michael Pahl is leaving Cedarville University due to his views, which are at odds with those of that fundamentalist institution. The university’s president has also resigned. Doug Chaplin asks how any institution with the views Cedarville stipulates in its statement of faith can [Read More...]

Support for Christopher Rollston: Update

Since I last blogged about the topic of Christopher Rollston’s situation at Emmanuel Christian Seminary, a lot has appeared not only on blogs, but in Inside Higher Ed, which carried a story about what has been going on. That article suggested that the Emmanuel Christian Seminary administration was choosing to pander to a potential donor (and pursue a large [Read More...]

The Last Laugh – and the Power of Blogging

Anthony Le Donne offers a confession on his blog. He used to view blogging dismissively. Not any more. Most readers will know that Anthony was fired from Lincoln Christian University because someone complained about his views. The latest development is that some of Anthony’s former co-workers brought the blogging by scholars and other interested parties [Read More...]

Conference on Religion and Technology

Vadim Putzu drew to my attention this conference at Franklin & Marshall College: Conference on Religion & Technology Sponsored by the Department of Religious Studies Saturday, October 27, 2012 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Space: Bonchek Lecture Hall Building: Ann & Richard Barshinger Life Sciences & Philosophy Building The Internet has given rise to much religious imagery.  Both [Read More...]

The Journal of Universal Rejection

Via The Panda’s Thumb, I learned of a wonderfully satirical academic journal: the Journal of Universal Rejection. By submitting your research to them, you get the advantage of having submitted your work to the highest ranking academic journal there is (when they are ranked by rejection rates), while also sparing yourself having to wait agonizingly long [Read More...]

The Future Format of Books?

Tim Bulkeley has written a book. The title is Not Only a Father: Talk of God as Mother in the Bible and Christian Tradition. You can buy it in traditional printed book format if you are so inclined. But he has also done some other interesting and perhaps radically innovative things with it. He’s made [Read More...]

The Only True God for Kindle

Most readers will immediately realize that this post is not going to be about who or what Kindles worship, but is about the fact that my book The Only True God: Early Christian Monotheism in Its Jewish Context is available for Kindle, and for much less than even the cost of the paperback edition. [Read more...]

Quote of the Day (Larry Hurtado)

I think I’m not alone in feeling that to show the ill-informed and illogical nature of the current wave of “mythicist” proponents is a bit like having to demonstrate that the earth isn’t flat, or that the sun doesn’t revolve around the earth, or that the moon-landings weren’t done on a movie lot.  It’s a [Read More...]

The Real Solution to the Synoptic Problem?

By Jordan Scharf, but shared on Joel Watts’ blog: The Gospel of Mark was the first draft of a doctoral candidate’s dissertation. He submitted it to his advisor who suggested the need for more background information about Jesus’ birth, maybe some more teaching material, and a stronger ending. The student rewrote his dissertation and submitted [Read More...]

A Technophile’s Confession

I am known as a technophile. Colleagues and friends contact me with technical problems. I’m a relatively early adopter, too. I was early into the blogosphere, and have tried to do pioneering things with integrating the internet into pedagogy and with the potential for interactive digital textbooks. But having admitted something to someone recently, it [Read More...]


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