#YCAS2015 and Gospel Authorship Around the Blogosphere

I’m not the only blogger who was at the York Christian Apocrypha Symposium, by any means. I am glad to see that Eric Vanden Eykel was inspired to revive his blog, and has posted a recap of the conference. Timo Paananen has also posted a recap of day 1. There was also a very strange [Read More...]

NASSCAL (North American Society for the Study of Christian Apocryphal Literature)

It isn’t NASCAR (although there was some discussion of whether it would be mostly funny or mostly confusing to try to get the acronym of this new organization to have an ‘R’ at the end). NASSCAL is the newly-formed North American Society for the Study of Christian Apocryphal Literature. Please pay a visit to their website, and if you [Read More...]

#YCAS2015 The Final Session

The final session after lunch was focused on the Gospel of Jesus' Wife. We did things slightly differently, not leaving Q&A in between papers but only after, since the session had a respondent. Brent Landau chaired, comparing the matter of GJW to a soap opera, and inviting the audience to ask for clarification if they [Read More...]

#YCAS2015 Fifth Panel

The morning of the second day of the York Christian Apocrypha Symposium began with Gregory Fewster discussing assumptions scholars work with regarding pseudepigraphy, and the question of what made a pseudepigraphal work “successful,” focusing in particular on 3 Corinthians. Among the assumptions we take for granted is that, for pseudepigraphy to work, the reputation of [Read More...]

#YCAS2015 Third Panel

The session after lunch began with Brandon Hawk talking about the use of apocryphal narratives in medieval English preaching (as also in art), using the interdisciplinary approach of transmission studies. His specific focus was Pseudo-Matthew, which was particularly popular in that context, and which is used in the manuscript known as Bercelli 6, a Christmas [Read More...]

#YCAS2015 Second Panel

The first paper in the second session at the York Christian Apocrypha Symposium was by Brent Landau, focused on the Revelation of the Magi. In that text, Christ himself is the star that leads the magi, and he multiplies their food. When they and others eat that food, they experience visions of Christ. Landau suggests [Read More...]

#YCAS2015 First Panel at the York Christian Apocrypha Symposium

Brent Landau got the day started by highlighting the Gospel of Jesus' Wife, and whether it is still worth talking about even if it is a forgery. An important question running through the symposium is whether our interest in ancient apocrypha as academics ought to be different from our interest (or lack thereof) when it [Read More...]

#YCAS2015 Begins

Last night I reached Toronto, where the York Christian Apocrypha Symposium is bing held, and met with Scott Brown and Timo Paananen for dinner. Both have written important studies of the so-called Secret Gospel of Mark, and Timo also contributed in a significant way to the discussions about the Gospel of Jesus' Wife by writing [Read More...]

Traveling to Toronto #YCAS2015

I’ll be traveling to Toronto today to the York Christian Apocrypha Symposium. I will try to blog about the conference as it happens, if I can, but I don’t yet know what wi-fi access will be like. Those on Twitter can follow tweets about the conference via the hashtag  #YCAS2015 [Read more...]

YCAS Gospel of Jesus’ Wife Panel

Tony Burke has shared details about the presenters and papers that will be part of the Gospel of Jesus’ Wife panel at the upcoming York Christian Apocrypha Symposium. The keynote speaker will be Bart Ehrman. You can find further details, and the finalized schedule, on the conference website. [Read more...]

Media Kindly Promotes Academic Conference on the Gospel of Jesus’ Wife

The only explanation I can think of for why the media is focusing attention again on the Gospel of Jesus’ Wife is that Tony Burke persuaded them to give some free publicity to the upcoming York Christian Apocrypha Symposium. Via the Archaeological News Tumblr, I learned of a LiveScience article by Owen Jarus which essentially [Read More...]