#GenCon Thursday

I attended several seminars and similar events today at Gen Con. As a Trade Day participant, I was able to enter the exhibit hall before the crowds. I bought some game books that looked promising for teaching purposes, and debated buying one about the persecution of heretics in the Middle Ages. The salesperson turned out [Read More...]

Neither Side Will Be Happy

Reality often challenges our assumptions. Sometimes evidence strongly favors one conclusion over another – there is no need to be a relativist. But just as often, we pigeonhole and stereotype when people and things are much more complex. I’ve been delighted to see some great instances of members of groups objecting when the group that they are [Read More...]

Eldad Keynan among the Tombs

ASOR recently had an article highlighting the work of my friend Eldad Keynan, who has been surveying tombs in Israel, especially in the Galilee. Urban von Wahlde had an article in Bible History Daily about what kind of stone was most likely placed over the opening of the tomb in which Jesus was buried, according [Read More...]

Jerusalem: The IMAX Movie

I have been excited about the IMAX movie Jerusalem since the first time I saw the trailer. The aerial perspectives are breathtaking, and will amaze even those who have been to the places in it. Last night, I had the opportunity to see an advance screening of the complete movie at the IMAX theater at the [Read More...]

Among the Tombs

My friend Eldad Keynan has set up a website, focusing on tombs in Israel, a subject that greatly interests him, and me as well. I remember visiting a tomb with him in 2011 which is supposedly that of Joshua of Sakhnin, but which Bellarmino Baggatti thinks might have been the tomb of Jacob of Sakhnin, a [Read More...]

Biblical Sodom Unearthed?

An article in World News Daily suggests that archaeologists may have uncovered the Biblical city of Sodom. Apparently the city was destroyed by fire and brimstone, and archaeological excavations show that all of the family tombs in the city belonged to same-sex couples who were dressed in fabulous clothing with no clashing colors. This would [Read More...]

Egregious Misuse of Archaeology

Yesterday I became aware of an article that illustrates the dubious way Biblical inerrantists use (and that is the appropriate word, rather than something like “engage in”) archaeology. It included this: Peterson supports conservative Christians getting involved in archaeology in order to use archaeology as a way to prove the Bible historically. “We interpret the [Read More...]

Ai Ai Ai!

It was in the news recently that Associates for Biblical Research claims to have made a find that indicates that the city of Ai could have been inhabited in a period when it could have been destroyed by the Israelites. Associates for Biblical Research, if you aren’t familiar with it, is an organization which is [Read More...]

Ancient Iraqi Aliens?

Via the All Mesopotamia Tumblr, I learned of the Huffington Post article suggesting that this figure on a vessel in the Iraqi National Museum in Baghdad is proof of ancient aliens: Any readers with expertise on ancient Mesopotamian art want to offer a different perspective on what is depicted? In almost but not entirely unrelated [Read More...]

Christopher Rollston on the James Ossuary

Steve Caruso shared the video below featuring Christopher Rollston and Gabriel Barkay talking about the James Ossuary. (If you missed it, see also Steve’s recent Twitter exchange with Jesus.) Of related interest, the Israel Antiquities Authorities has an online archaeological database that is full of useful resources.   [Read more...]

Two Shekel Chuck

It has been proposed that the above Hebrew inscription may have indicated that the vessel contained wine of the lowest quality. The article’s proposed connections with Solomon are pure speculation, but given the traditions connecting Solomon’s court with a school of wisdom, it is fun to ponder whether, then as now, grad students were among [Read More...]


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