Not Exactly a New Problem

UPDATE: For those who may not find it, the quote comes from Augustine’s St. Augustine, De Genesi ad litteram libri duodecim, “The Literal Meaning of Genesis,” Book 1 chapter 19. That is in itself worth highlighting, since it makes even clearer that Augustine could consider the “literal meaning” important and yet not take it to [Read More...]

The Siblinghood of Saint Augustine, Physicist

The Doctor Who comic book story “The Doctor and the Nurse” features a group that the Doctor calls “religious fanatics.” They encounter them on their home planet of Hipponensis 3. The Doctor explains that the Siblinghood of Saint Augustine, Physicist “are presentists. They believe the past and future don’t exist – just the present – [Read More...]

Mapping Bible Contradictions

Via Gizmodo, I was reminded of a web site that was created recently, BibViz, attempting to map the Bible's contradictions. While it tends to circulate among atheists, and to meet with adamant denials from conservatives, liberal Christians were among the first to point these sorts of things out – and even before us, there were [Read More...]

C3PO Visits Canterbury Cathedral

Via Episcopal Memes on Facebook   [Read more...]

Review of Charles E. Gutenson, The Right Church

I responded with eagerness to the invitation to be part of the Patheos Book Club about Charles E. Gutenson’s book The Right Church: Live Like the First Christians. But upon receiving a copy and seeing the subtitle, I began to have doubts – was this going to be yet another of those books that claims [Read More...]

Quote of the Day (Chris Heard)

This is…a plea that we follow Augustine and divest ourselves of the notion that interpreting a text literally means taking it as an historically accurate account of things that happened in time and space. If the text isn’t an historical narrative, then treating it as an historical narrative is not properly a literal interpretation. – Chris Heard, “Interpreting Genesis [Read More...]

Healing and History

In a discussion of mythicism and of Maurice Casey’s treatment of a miracle story in the Gospel of Mark, the broader issue of what historians can say about accounts of healings and miracles is bound to come up. A historian can never rightly conclude that a miracle or other supernatural event has occurred. But surely [Read More...]


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X