More on Ancient Language Acquisition

Amber Baker shared contrasting experiences of learning Hebrew. Brian Schultz posted about fluency and reading comprehension. Jim Davila did better on Daniel Streett’s quiz than most. Steve Caruso asked us to try the same quiz with Aramaic. Jim Davila shared information about a course on Zoharic Aramaic (with links to pdfs of the text). [Read more...]

Sooner or Later It Comes Down To Faith

In one of my classes, after discussing a number of difficulties and issues related to the creation stories in Genesis, a student chimed in that sooner or later one simply has to have faith. I didn’t disagree, but instead asked: What sort of faith, and faith in what? We had already read part of Paul [Read More...]

Discussion of Languages and New Testament Study around the Blogosphere

The discussion of which languages you need for New Testament study seems to have gone viral. Here are links to those who have chimed in since I wrote my own post on the subject: James Crossley Chris Brady Duane Smith Larry Hurtado (twice) BW16 (twice) Jim West Matthew R. Malcolm See also Mike Kok’s contribution [Read More...]

Review of The Gnostics: Myth, Ritual, and Diversity in Early Christianity by David Brakke

My review of The Gnostics: Myth, Ritual, and Diversity in Early Christianity by David Brakke has appeared in Review of Biblical Literature and can be read online. [Read more...]

Brickical Literalism

The pastor of my church has been preaching through the plagues in Exodus, and has been sharing from The Brick Testament as a way of introducing the stories. Today’s subject was the plague of hail, and The Brick Testament nicely highlights the absurdity of some details in that story if you’ve been taking the language [Read More...]

Biblicism Around the Blogosphere

Chris Heard has begun blogging about a new book, Bible Made Impossible, The: Why Biblicism Is Not a Truly Evangelical Reading of Scripture. And Randall Rauser has several, including “How fundamentalists undermine the authority of scripture” and “Should we really interpret the Bible literally when possible?” In other news, Scott Bailey shares an account of [Read More...]

Let the Text Disturb You

Having posted a link earlier today to Thom Stark’s criticisms of something Mike Heiser wrote, I am happy to be able to pass on something by Heiser himself. He posted what he calls “Heiser’s Laws for Bible Study,” and among them was this sage piece of advice: “If, after you’ve done the grunt work of [Read More...]

The Bible Says It – Does That Settle It?

Take a look at this post by Crystal St. Marie Lewis, offering parallel fictional depictions two very similar-sounding Christian perspectives, separated by a century. [Read more...]

Recipe for Biblical Literalism (From the Archives)

Take one part overly-familiar Bible verses. Repeat these verses over and over again until a thick, opaque layer is formed. Use this layer to cover the remaining 39 parts consisting of Bible verses that do not talk about the same subject as those more familiar verses, verses which seem to disagree with them, as well [Read More...]

Literalism, Critical Thinking and Science around the Blogosphere

Let’s start this collection of links with Adam Kotsko’s post on literalism. Here’s a sample: I sometimes had to fight an uphill battle with secular liberal students who basically took fundamentalists at their word that they were following the Bible “literally” and who felt that such “literalism” was somehow the most authentic form of religion. [Read More...]

It’s Hard to be “Biblical”

Many might think of being “Biblical” as challenging because it would be strenuous and demanding to follow every single detail literally, as A. J. Jacobs did in The Year of Living Biblically: One Man’s Humble Quest to Follow the Bible as Literally as Possible. In fact, there are a large number of different ways of [Read More...]


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X