#GenCon Thursday

I attended several seminars and similar events today at Gen Con. As a Trade Day participant, I was able to enter the exhibit hall before the crowds. I bought some game books that looked promising for teaching purposes, and debated buying one about the persecution of heretics in the Middle Ages. The salesperson turned out [Read More...]

Proceed With Extreme Caution

This cartoon from Evolving Perspectives is inspired by the trigger warnings that some universities have been including in connection with classic literature and art. But it also highlights the reason for exposing students to literature in the first place. Sometimes we quiz and test in the interest of getting them to actually do the reading. And unfortunately that [Read More...]

BTW

BTW, this comes from @PHDComics. It is a follow-up to another cartoon from there which I shared recently. See also a recent article suggesting that emoticons are not ruining language but revolutionizing it. [Read more...]

Ten Professorial Commandments

Elliott Ratzman offered the following Ten Commandments in Inside Higher Ed: 1. Thou shalt have no other object of attention in the classroom. No devices — phones, gadgets, computers, guns — or distractions; I am a jealous and wrathful instructor. 2. Thou shalt honor thy fellow students. They are also struggling, growing, with opinions always changing, and [Read More...]

Book of Job Trigger Warning

Rob Zaretsky’s piece in Inside Higher Ed proposes trigger warnings for a number of pieces of classic literature. Given my field, I particularly appreciated his treatment of the Book of Job: Anonymous’ “The Book of Job” “Are you sure this is part of the Bible?” asked many respondents, who also exhibited intense unease with God’s actions, [Read More...]

Professor Vader

Via Brad Matthies on Twitter.   [Read more...]

Google Glass in Class

I have the opportunity to be one of the Google Glass Explorers and try out this new technology early. As someone who teaches information literacy skills, I’m very interested in seeing how it might or might not integrate into classroom use – whether by the professor alone, or at some point when most people have [Read More...]

Five Awful Reasons to Teach Creationism in Schools

Jack Wellman has posted five really awful reasons to teach creationism in schools. He doesn’t seem to know that they are awful, and so let me briefly explain. 1) There are no criticisms of evolution: Wellman complains that there are no criticisms of evolution in textbooks even though it is (in scientific technical terminology he [Read More...]

“So shalt thou put evil away from among you”

P. Z. Myers shared a link to a wonderful account of a science teacher responding effectively to the inane “were you there?” question that Ken Ham and other ignoramuses think are clever. Click through to read it. [Read more...]

Creationism and Religious Freedom

Today my class on “Religion and Freedom of Expression” met for the first time. It is a class with a non-traditional format – we meet a few Saturday mornings for a few hours, plus also four evenings when students attend lectures in our public lecture series and have dinner and a Q&A time with the [Read More...]

Reciprocal Discomfort

On Wednesday, Butler University hosted its start of year faculty workshop. I presented on my experience of teaching online in the breakout sessions. In the first plenary session, we were compelled to write about, and then share with others sitting at our table, one thing that we find challenging or that makes us insecure. I [Read More...]


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