Lifelong Learning in Religious Studies

My colleague Brent Hege shared on Facebook the sense of trepidation one has as a professor who is not an expert in Shintoism, and finds that one has a student who is Shinto in a course that will include a brief overview of that tradition. I chimed in in a comment and wrote the following: [Read More...]

(Learning) From a Distance

This is the follow-up to my song parody about online learning, “Message Sent on Moodle,” although I actually had the idea for doing a parody of “From a Distance” on this topic first. Hope you enjoy it. Here are the lyrics: From A Distance From a distance An online course can seem Like something that [Read More...]

Message Sent On Moodle

My latest parody song, this time on one of the potential pitfalls of online learning. [Read more...]

Religion and the MOOCs

Scot McKnight blogged recently about “the MOOC delusion.” I think it is fair to say that anyone who thought that MOOCs would be the future of higher education had not thought about the matter with an adequate historical perspective. It has long been the case that academics have, in some form or other, given our perspectives [Read More...]

Popping Shrimp and Online Teaching

There’s a wonderful op-ed piece by Aaron Hirsh in today’s New York Times, on online teaching and what it stands to gain and lose. His proposal, that wise use of online components can free up more time for experiential learning, resonates with my own thoughts on this subject.   [Read more...]

Online and Hybrid Teaching Resources

Several items of interest have come my way today. The Chronicle of Higher Education had an article about flipping the classroom in an introductory course about ancient Rome. And the supplement to volume 16 of Teaching Theology and Religion is currently accessible for free online, with many book reviews focused on technology, pedagogy, and the offering [Read More...]

A Letter from an Online Student

A friend shared with me a letter that a friend of his wrote, since he knew that I would soon be teaching a course online. Because I am persuaded that this individual’s experience is not unique, and that educators and institutions of higher education can learn from this, I am sharing the letter, with the [Read More...]

Classes Begin

Classes begin today at Butler University. This semester I am teaching two core curriculum courses, one on the Bible and the other a freshman seminar on faith, doubt, and reason. My third course is an upper-level course on religion and science. If you teach, what are you teaching this semester? If you are a student, [Read More...]

If I Had One Hour To Live…

As many of us prepare to teach again, professors are thinking already about how students will evaluate their courses. Here’s what one student wrote on an evaluation form, about what they’d do  if they had just one hour left to live: HT The Mills River Progressive [Read more...]

Online Sources in the Classroom

In my current teaching, I focus increasing amounts of attention on the discerning use of online sources of information. People no longer rack their brains to recall facts learned in school. They will pull out a device and look up what they want to know. And so, while some factual information is crucial in order [Read More...]

What We’re Learning from Online Education

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