Is it OK to Doubt the Bible?

An interesting conversation between Tom Thatcher, professor at Cincinnati Christian University, and Tyler McKenzie, teaching pastor at Northeast Christian Church. Whatever you think of some of the details of the conversation, it reflects a dialectic approach that progressive Christians can embrace: On the one hand, recognizing that doubting and even disbelieving the Bible is not only [Read More...]

Questions vs. Security

This cartoon from David Hayward seems to me to be a good one for the transition to a new year: I like this one better than the previous one that I commented on. It illustrates a number of things, in my view correctly. Choosing a path of openness and exploration vs. pat answers and the [Read More...]

Fringe: Are Emotions Our Strength Or Our Weakness?

The episode of Fringe “The Human Kind,” which aired this past Friday, involves a lot of discussion that intersects with faith, doubt, reason, intuition, emotion, and even God and providence. Before getting into the spoiler-containing part of the post, let me say something that I think could already be said based on previous episodes. Joshua [Read More...]

Faith, Doubt, Sanity, and Don Quixote

Last week in my class “Faith, Doubt, and Reason” we began discussing Don Quixote, which the students had begun reading not long before. It was something of a puzzle to them what the connection was between the novel and the theme of the class. But the connections are there, and there are many of them. [Read More...]

Quote of the Day (Robert T. Weston)

Cherish your doubts, for doubt is the attendant of truth. Doubt is the key to the door of knowledge; it is the servant of discovery. A belief which may not be questioned binds us to error, for there is incompleteness and imperfection in every belief. Doubt is the touchstone of truth; it is an acid [Read More...]

Biblical Faith is not Avoiding Doubt, nor is it Feeling Certain

The Bible itself raises challenges to the way conservative Christians in our time tend to understand what the Bible is, as supposedly an inerrant text that can eliminate doubt from one's life. The Bible itself tells story after story about people for whom doubt was part of their spiritual life. There is something profoundly ironic [Read More...]

The Working Hour

Just as there is a lot of great orchestral, symphonic and chamber music that deserves to be more widely know, there are a lot of songs by well-known (and not so well known) artists on their albums but which were never released as singles, and so are not as widely known as they perhaps deserve [Read More...]

Missa Mirabilis: Doubt as an Act of Worship

Tonight (actually, yesterday by the time I am posting this) I went to hear a concert at the Hilbert Circle Theater featuring the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra and the Indianapolis Symphonic Choir. The centerpiece of the concert was the world premiere of Stephen Hough’s mass, “Missa Mirabilis,” as arranged for choir and orchestra. The composer was [Read More...]

Doubt Consolidation

Via Doug Chaplin [Read more...]

Martin Luther King and the Quest for a Just Society

This semester, my freshman seminar course “Faith, Doubt and Reason” focuses on utopias, dystopias, and the quest for community and a just society. Since we start tomorrow, the day after Martin Luther King Day, I moved the readings – in fact, viewings – up to the very first day of class. Most people are familiar [Read More...]

Doubt as Sacred Duty

Today in my freshman class “Faith, Doubt and Reason” the text for discussion was Rene Descartes’ Meditations on First Philosophy. One point I sought to highlight early on is Descartes’ understanding of doubt as a sacred duty: Descartes’ skeptical approach to knowledge and reasoning was an expression of his religious faith, with the aim both [Read More...]


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