Galileo was Wrong (Richard Carrier and Arguing from Consensus)

Richard Carrier has posted on arguments from consensus on his blog. It is, like most of his posts, unnecessarily long to make the point that it seeks to. Carrier suggests that laypeople can and should evaluate the arguments of experts, even with respect to the consensus. That seems to me strikingly odd – if laypeople [Read More...]

Mythicism, Docetism, and the James Ossuary

Hector Avalos published a news article on the historical Jesus, which illustrates the danger of trying to interpret evidence in a field outside one’s own area of specialty. Avalos wonders how anyone could have doubted that Jesus came in the flesh, as 1 John mentions, if the historicity of Jesus was well established. This misses [Read More...]

Outside the Gate

As we reached the end of Hebrews in my Sunday school class last week, I was struck once again by how there are texts which are so clearly at odds with mythicism, and yet which are explained away with a little hand-waving. One example is the reference to Jesus suffering “outside the gate” (Hebrews 13:12). [Read More...]

Bart Ehrman and the Quest of the Historical Jesus of Nazareth

Tom Verenna drew a new book to my attention, Bart Ehrman and the Quest of the Historical Jesus of Nazareth. He has now written a very negative review of the volume. Although Richard Carrier is a contributor to the volume, and says that Tom’s review is too scathing, Carrier’s own review is not much less [Read More...]

Further Problematizing Richard Carrier’s Claims about Jesus

Ian has a further detailed explanation of Bayes’ Theorem on his blog. It problematizes Richard Carrier’s use of it in relation to history in general, and the historical Jesus in particular. I am also grateful to Nick Covington for sharing this video, which shows more of what Richard Carrier thinks about the figure of Jesus [Read More...]

Stuff Mythicists Say: “Q Was Real, Jesus Wasn’t”

Mythicists say a lot of ludicrous things, and perhaps it would be useful to highlight some of the more astonishing and laughable ones from time to time. Mythicists like Earl Doherty will accept the existence of Q – a hypothetical source the existence of which is deduced from the common material shared between Matthew and [Read More...]

Review of Bart Ehrman, Did Jesus Exist? Part Two

This is the second part of my review of Bart Ehrman’s book Did Jesus Exist?: The Historical Argument for Jesus of Nazareth, in which I discuss the second and third parts of the book. The first part of my review, on the first part of the book, can be found by clicking anywhere on this [Read More...]

Review of Bart Ehrman, Did Jesus Exist? Part One

I’m grateful to have been given the opportunity to participate in the blog tour about Bart Ehrman’s latest book, Did Jesus Exist?: The Historical Argument for Jesus of Nazareth. Ehrman emphasizes that many mythicists appear to approach the question of Jesus’ existence in the manner of conspiracy theorists, and since such people refuse to change [Read More...]

Review of Earl Doherty’s Jesus: Neither God Nor Man chapter 10 part two

I’ve finally found some time to post my second blog entry about chapter 10 of Earl Doherty’s book Jesus: Neither God Nor Man – The Case for a Mythical Jesus. Here’s a link to my first post about this chapter. Ironically, even though I have written far more already on the first 1/6 of the [Read More...]

Paul Mythicism?

There certainly are those Jesus mythicists who would also deny that there was a historical Paul. But for many mythicists, perhaps the majority, the historicity of Paul and the authenticity of Paul’s letters is in fact important to their argument, since their case for mythicism focuses much attention on what Paul allegedly did not say [Read More...]

As Bad as Mythicism: Jesus as Caesar

Mythicism is just one of several categories of implausible claims that one will encounter in connection with Jesus. The Life of Antoninus Pius has a blog post about another one, that proposed by Francesco Carotta, who claims that Jesus was Caesar. Click through to read about it, and why no one ought to find it persuasive. [Read More...]


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