(Learning) From a Distance

This is the follow-up to my song parody about online learning, “Message Sent on Moodle,” although I actually had the idea for doing a parody of “From a Distance” on this topic first. Hope you enjoy it. Here are the lyrics: From A Distance From a distance An online course can seem Like something that [Read More...]

Saturday at #GenCon

I spent today at GenCon, and thought I’d share some thoughts and photos. The first thing I went to was a seminar on “Playful Learning in Role Play” led by David Simkins, a professor in the School of Interactive Games and Media at the Rochester Institute of Technology. The session had elements that were inspiring and [Read More...]

Book of Job Trigger Warning

Rob Zaretsky’s piece in Inside Higher Ed proposes trigger warnings for a number of pieces of classic literature. Given my field, I particularly appreciated his treatment of the Book of Job: Anonymous’ “The Book of Job” “Are you sure this is part of the Bible?” asked many respondents, who also exhibited intense unease with God’s actions, [Read More...]

Proof That God Loves Us

I fact-checked the quote about beer that is often attributed to Ben Franklin (“Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy”), and found that it is an adaptation of something that Franklin wrote about wine: On parle de la conversion de l’eau en vin, à la nôce de Cana, comme d’un [Read More...]

The Theory and Practice of Oligarchical Capitalism

Talking about George Orwell's 1984, and the book within the book, is always interesting. But this semester the discussion took some turns that seem to me worth sharing. The book by Emmanuel Goldstein, The Theory and Practice of Oligarchical Collectivism, is an intentional parody of Marx and Engels' Communist Manifesto. It represents a plan to [Read More...]

Courage Defined

I came across several variations on the image below. It is certainly an apocryphal story, but one that may perhaps be worth commenting on. First, the sheer number of these kinds of stories and the variations on them suggest that this is an example of an urban legend. Whether it is based on any actual [Read More...]

Finding Your Vocation

This video features a Butler graduate, Dr. Stephanie Slemp, who majored in religion, talking about her choice of major, her vocation and career path, and the role that the Center for Faith and Vocation here at Butler University played in her exploration of and reflection on the decisions she made. [Read more...]

The Value of a Liberal Arts Education

Peter Drucker wrote the following more than half a century ago in his book his Landmarks of Tomorrow: Since we live in an age of innovation, a practical education must prepare a man for work that does not yet exist and cannot yet be clearly defined. To be able to do this a man must [Read More...]

First Day of Classes

Today was the first day of classes at Butler University, as in many other places. This semester I’m teaching the Bible, the second semester of my first year seminar course “Faith, Doubt, and Reason,” and the second semester of a seminar course on “Religion and Freedom of Expression.” If you are an educator or a [Read More...]

Google Glass in Class

I have the opportunity to be one of the Google Glass Explorers and try out this new technology early. As someone who teaches information literacy skills, I’m very interested in seeing how it might or might not integrate into classroom use – whether by the professor alone, or at some point when most people have [Read More...]

Like

So apparently now you can “like” things not only beyond Facebook, but even on paper. I wonder how many educators will/would use this stamp, and why or why not… UPDATE: Someone asked about a “dislike” stamp. Apparently there is indeed a set of Like and Dislike Stamps and you can buy them from Amazon.com! Here’s a [Read More...]


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