How To Get The Least Possible Out Of University Religion Classes

Michael Kruger has made a video which describes his own experience of having taken classes with Bart Ehrman, who he depicts as attacking Christianity. He complains that youth groups do not prepare student intellectually for their experience at university. That is true – but what Kruger seems to want is not intellectual and academic preparation, but inoculation that [Read More...]

#GenCon Religion

While there is a Sunday worship service at Gen Con (which I didn’t go to), and on Friday there was a panel about Christianity and gaming, Saturday seems to have been “religion day” at Gen Con this year. There were three sessions dedicated to the topic of religion in gaming and fiction, and I made it to [Read More...]

The Importance of Theology and Science Fiction

This round-up of posts began when W. David O. Taylor shared his syllabus for an independent study about theology and science fiction. My own thoughts are turning to this very intersection of subjects, as one of my sabbatical projects is a short volume on theology and sci-fi. Then, Russell McCutcheon blogged about the AAR draft statement [Read More...]

The Opposite of Faith

Kim Fabricius considers a number of possible and oft-proposed identifications for the opposite of faith, and proposes that the real opposite of faith is fear. He writes: There is a lot of fear around in the church today. Fundamentalists are afraid of scholarship and science. Traditionalists are afraid of change and newness. Many of us are anxious [Read More...]

My Blog Post Has Become An Essay

I expanded my recent blog post about the experience of my son discovering RateMyProfessors.com into an essay for Inside Higher Ed. You can now read it on their website: “When My Son Discovered RateMyProfessors.com.”   [Read more...]

Trade Day at #GenCon (Gaming and Education)

Gen Con will be taking place at the end of July, and this year I’ll be attending Trade Day, the day before the activities most gamers are interested in. That day includes a large number of sessions aimed at educators. I was quite astounded by the sheer number of them, so many overlapping sessions that one has to choose [Read More...]

Graduate Doubt-Free

The publicity material continues to emphasize the 95% job placement rate of Butler graduates, and so is presumably a pun on what students might consider preferable, namely to graduate debt-free. But when I first glanced the signage, I didn’t see the second part, as it was blocked by a vehicle. As a professor in the [Read More...]

A Textbook Case of Addiction

Or should that be “a case of textbook addiction”? From the webcomic series Cyanide and Happiness.   [Read more...]

Ability to Focus

If someone tells you that today’s students, perhaps because of video games, simply cannot focus the way students could in the past, don’t believe them. Halo Reach players spent five years trying to accomplish something in the game that seemed impossible: getting into…an empty room, one that was otherwise inaccessible, referred to as the “Banshee [Read More...]

Fahrenheit 451 on Standardized Testing

“If you don’t want a man unhappy politically, don’t give him two sides to a question to worry him; give him one. Better yet, give him none. Let him forget there is such a thing as war. If the government is inefficient, top-heavy, and tax-mad, better it be all those than that people worry over [Read More...]

Let the Punishment Fit the Crime

This comic from Cyanide and Happiness relates to both religious ideas of punishments in an afterlife, and education, and so I had to share it. There is a long history of people imagining punishments in an afterlife that are suited to the evils they did in this life. And, however problematic that is, it is probably [Read More...]


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