The Theory and Practice of Oligarchical Capitalism

Talking about George Orwell's 1984, and the book within the book, is always interesting. But this semester the discussion took some turns that seem to me worth sharing. The book by Emmanuel Goldstein, The Theory and Practice of Oligarchical Collectivism, is an intentional parody of Marx and Engels' Communist Manifesto. It represents a plan to [Read More...]

Courage Defined

I came across several variations on the image below. It is certainly an apocryphal story, but one that may perhaps be worth commenting on. First, the sheer number of these kinds of stories and the variations on them suggest that this is an example of an urban legend. Whether it is based on any actual [Read More...]

Finding Your Vocation

This video features a Butler graduate, Dr. Stephanie Slemp, who majored in religion, talking about her choice of major, her vocation and career path, and the role that the Center for Faith and Vocation here at Butler University played in her exploration of and reflection on the decisions she made. [Read more...]

The Value of a Liberal Arts Education

Peter Drucker wrote the following more than half a century ago in his book his Landmarks of Tomorrow: Since we live in an age of innovation, a practical education must prepare a man for work that does not yet exist and cannot yet be clearly defined. To be able to do this a man must [Read More...]

First Day of Classes

Today was the first day of classes at Butler University, as in many other places. This semester I’m teaching the Bible, the second semester of my first year seminar course “Faith, Doubt, and Reason,” and the second semester of a seminar course on “Religion and Freedom of Expression.” If you are an educator or a [Read More...]

Google Glass in Class

I have the opportunity to be one of the Google Glass Explorers and try out this new technology early. As someone who teaches information literacy skills, I’m very interested in seeing how it might or might not integrate into classroom use – whether by the professor alone, or at some point when most people have [Read More...]

Like

So apparently now you can “like” things not only beyond Facebook, but even on paper. I wonder how many educators will/would use this stamp, and why or why not… UPDATE: Someone asked about a “dislike” stamp. Apparently there is indeed a set of Like and Dislike Stamps and you can buy them from Amazon.com! Here’s a [Read More...]

Churches and Intellectuals

Stephen Mattson has written a piece for Sojourners, “Do Churches Alienate Intellectuals?” Here is a sample: By their very nature, intellectuals are curious. They analyze, theorize, and love to ask questions. These attributes are often criticized by church leaders and seen as an attack on traditional and established institutionalized beliefs. Innocent inquires are often met [Read More...]

World of Biblecraft

Chris Heard wrote recently about his effort to “gamify” a course he teaches. Here's a snippet: Here’s the elevator pitch: My Religion 101 course, also known as “World of Biblecraft,” functions like a cross between Farmville, Minecraft, and the World of Warcraft, where students earn XP and level up by exploring the Bible.Students enter the [Read More...]

If Education is Against Your Beliefs

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Religion and the MOOCs

Scot McKnight blogged recently about “the MOOC delusion.” I think it is fair to say that anyone who thought that MOOCs would be the future of higher education had not thought about the matter with an adequate historical perspective. It has long been the case that academics have, in some form or other, given our perspectives [Read More...]


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