Moss and Baden on the Lastest Mythicist Nonsense

Via Candida Moss, I learned that she and Joel Baden have responded to – and appropriate poked fun at – the latest mythicist volume to appear, Michael Paulkovich’s No Meek Messiah: Christianity’s Lies, Laws and Legacy. After showing that Paulkovich’s list of 126 ancient authors he thinks should have mentioned Jesus, the list includes people [Read More...]

Galileo was Wrong (Richard Carrier and Arguing from Consensus)

Richard Carrier has posted on arguments from consensus on his blog. It is, like most of his posts, unnecessarily long to make the point that it seeks to. Carrier suggests that laypeople can and should evaluate the arguments of experts, even with respect to the consensus. That seems to me strikingly odd – if laypeople [Read More...]

History and the Bible on Reddit

Today there will be an AMA session on ancient Jewish and Christian history, including but not limited to matters that intersect with the Bible, on the AskHistorians subreddit. I will be participating. Hope you’ll pay a visit! UPDATE: Here’s a direct link:  http://www.reddit.com/r/AskHistorians/comments/1sbq67/we_are_scholarsexperts_on_ancient_judaism/   [Read more...]

Touching Earth

A blog post by Jericho Brisance, “Christian Agnosticism and Touching Earth,” was drawn to my attention. It emphasizes that it is unacceptable to use history and science in an attempt to justify the Bible without being open to the disconfirmation of the Bible through the use of those same methods. Here is a taste: We [Read More...]

Mythicism and Parallelomania around the Blogosphere

My recent use of the term “parallelomania” (popularized by Samuel Sandmel) has sparked some discussion in the blogosphere. It’s All Random…Mostly expressed dislike for the term. Ian then responded, writing: I have some sympathy for just using the term ‘parallelomania’ as a term of skepticism. To say, yes it is fine to find parallels, but as [Read More...]

Was Jesus a Seditionist?

A recent article by Fernando Bermejo-Rubio in The Bible and Interpretation raised the question of whether Jesus was a “seditionist” – which he defines as “The hypothesis that Jesus of Nazareth and his followers were in fundamental sympathy with the principles of the members of the anti-Roman resistance groups, the use of violence not excepted [Read More...]

Bart Ehrman and the Quest of the Historical Jesus of Nazareth

Tom Verenna drew a new book to my attention, Bart Ehrman and the Quest of the Historical Jesus of Nazareth. He has now written a very negative review of the volume. Although Richard Carrier is a contributor to the volume, and says that Tom’s review is too scathing, Carrier’s own review is not much less [Read More...]

Embarrassment, Muhammad, and Jesus

Loren Rosson has an interesting blog post on the use of the criterion of embarrassment in a discussion of the historical existence of Muhammad. For those interested in the application of such a criterion to the historical figure of Jesus (as many readers of this blog are), this post will be of great interest! Of [Read More...]

The Historical Jesus – Now With Even Less Futility!

Pat McCullough has written a response to my response to his earlier posts, clarifying what points he agrees with me on, and what he actually had in mind when he talked about “futility.” See too Brian LePort’s round-up of and comments on the discussion up until that point. [Read more...]

Is Historical Jesus Research Futile?

Pat McCullough has a couple of posts on his blog in which he treats historical Jesus research as “futile.” If one is of the view that all attempts at knowing about the past are so complicated by our inability to infallibly separate memory from invention, or to attain absolute certainty, then by all means dismiss [Read More...]

Distorted Images

A friend and colleague shared an article on Facebook about the distorted view of the area of land masses that we get from conventional Mercator maps. This is a Peters map, which shows area accurately: This doesn't mean that the above map is “right” and the ones that we use more often are “wrong.” A [Read More...]


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